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The Daily Dispatch: January 31, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 8 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Blackwood or search for Blackwood in all documents.

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made up their minds to attack. But on advancing on the morning of the fourteenth, reports General Meade, it was ascertained he (the enemy) had retired the night previous by the bridge at Falling Waters and the ford at Williamsport. In striking confirmation of the sketch now given of this important battle, it may be interesting to quote a few brief extracts from the diary of a British officer, who was a guest of General Lee during the campaign in Pennsylvania, and which was published in Blackwood's Magazine, in September last. The writer was an eye-witness of the battle of Gettysburgh, and the hearty praise he lavishes upon the confederate troops and their generals, shows that all his sympathies were with the South, and he takes no pains to conceal his prejudices against the North. Speaking of the moment when the columns of Longstreet had been finally repulsed by our left, on Friday afternoon, July third, he says: It is difficult to exaggerate the critical state of affairs, as th