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The Daily Dispatch: January 31, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 8 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe. You can also browse the collection for Blackwood or search for Blackwood in all documents.

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Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 19: the Byron controversy, 1869-1870. (search)
then, while I tell you the position in which I stood, and what was my course in relation to it. A shameless attack on my friend's memory had appeared in the Blackwood of July, 1869, branding Lady Byron as the vilest of criminals, and recommending the Guiccioli book to a Christian public as interesting from the very fact that it was the avowed production of Lord Byron's mistress. No efficient protest was made against this outrage in England, and Littell's Living age reprinted the Blackwood article, and the Harpers, the largest publishing house in America, perhaps in the world, republished the book. Its statements — with those of the Blackwood, PallBlackwood, Pall Mall Gazette, and other English periodicalswere being propagated through all the young reading and writing world of America. I was meeting them advertised in dailies, and made up into articles in magazines, and thus the generation of to-day, who had no means of judging Lady Byron but by these fables of her slanderers, were being
, M., to paint portrait of H. B. S., 241. Bentley, London publisher, offers pay for Uncle Tom's Cabin, 202. Betty's bright idea, date of, 491. Bible, 48; Uncle Tom's, 262; use and influence of, 263. Bible Heroines, date of, 491. Bibliography of H. B. S., 490. Biography, H. B. S.'s remarks on writing and understanding, 126. Birney, J. G., office wrecked, 81 et seq.; H. B. S.'s sympathy with, 84. Birthday, seventieth, celebration of by Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 500. Blackwood's attack on Lady Byron, 448. Blantyre, Lord, 230. Bogue, David, 189-191. Boston opens doors to slave-hunters, 144. Boston Library, Prof. Stowe enjoys proximity to, 509. Bowdoin College calls Prof. Stowe, 125, 129. Bowen, H. C., 181. Bruce. John, of Litchfield Academy, H. B. S.'s tribute to, 14; lectures on Butler's Analogy, 32. Brigham, Miss, character of, 46. Bright, John, letter to H. B. S. on her Appeal to English women, 389. Brooklyn, Mrs. Stowe's visit to broth