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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 3: Apprenticeship.—1818-1825. (search)
Lafayette, who was deeply moved by the sight, begged the people, with tears in his eyes, no longer to expose themselves so for his sake, but to disperse and come and shake him by the hand the next morning, and Lloyd was one of the multitude who availed themselves of that privilege. His most considerable contribution to the Herald N. P. Herald, May 17, 1825. during the last year of his apprenticeship was a threecolumn article on American Writers, in reply to an attack by John Neal in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine; but most of the writers in whose behalf he sharpened his quill are now forgotten and unknown. On the 10th of December, 1825, he completed his apprenticeship of seven years and two months in the Herald office, and under the (as it subsequently appeared, mistaken) impression that the year of his birth was 1804, and that he had now attained his majority, he signalized the event by a fervid poem of eight stanzas, entitled Twenty-One! with this concluding invocation:
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
slavish knees that at thy footstool bow, I also kneel—but with far other vow Do hail thee and thy herd of hirelings base:— I swear, while life-blood warms my throbbing veins, Still to oppose and thwart, with heart and hand, Thy brutalising sway—till Afric's chains Are burst, and Freedom rules the rescued land,— Trampling Oppression and his iron rod: Such is the vow I take—so help me god! The author of this sonnet was Thomas Pringle, the Scottish poet, 1789– 1834, one of the founders of Blackwood's Magazine, and Secretary of the London Society for the Abolition of Slavery throughout the British Dominions (Lib. 1.43; 6.188; May's Recollections, p. 112). William Lloyd Garrison. Boston, January 1, 1831. From this manifesto, in which, as was Mr. Garrison's wont, every word was weighed with a more than rhetorical exactitude, one misses any allusion to the American Colonization Society, unless the passage on gradual abolition, with its reference to the Park-Street Church discou