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The Daily Dispatch: January 31, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 8 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Russell Lowell, Among my books. You can also browse the collection for Blackwood or search for Blackwood in all documents.

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James Russell Lowell, Among my books, Keats. (search)
utraged by the Lyrical Ballads. It is idle to attempt to show that Keats did not suffer keenly from the vulgarities of Blackwood and the Quarterly. He suffered in proportion as his ideal was high, and he was conscious of falling below it. In Engla actor, Haydon (Autobiography, Vol. I. p. 379) says that he strongly suspects Terry to have written the articles in Blackwood. thought so even more distinctly in Blackwood, bidding the young apothecary back to his gallipots! It is not pleasant Blackwood, bidding the young apothecary back to his gallipots! It is not pleasant to be talked down upon by your inferiors who happen to have the advantage of position, nor to be drenched with ditchwater, though you know it to be thrown by a scullion in a garret. Keats, as his was a temperament in which sensibility was excessimakes him a severe critic of his own works. My own domestic criticism has given me pain without comparison beyond what Blackwood or the Quarterly could inflict; and also, when I feel I am right, no external praise can give me such a glow as my own