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The Daily Dispatch: January 31, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 8 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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General Johnston. A late article in Blackwood's Magazine makes an interesting reference to the Confederate Generals, and among them, of course, to the veteran Commander-in-Chief of the army of the Potomac. Virginia, which has contributed so liberally in men and means to this war, and which has so many sons of whom she has reason to be proud, has none more worthy of her admiration and confidence than Gen. Johnston. We believe it is the universal opinion of military men that as a strategist, planner of campaigns, and a leader of armies in the field, this accomplished son of Virginia has no superior on this continent. His masterly conduct of affairs at Harper's Feery, and the reticence he manifested with reference to his ulterior objects, and the uncomplaining fortitude with which he bore the captions criticism of the ignorant multitude about his falling back to Winchester, leaving it to events to elucidate the wisdom of his course, show him to be not only a first rate military,
Blackwood's Magazine. This old tory journal, which was wont to pitch into everything American with a thoroughness of scorn and a power of invective rarely equalled, seems, upon one of its favorite and most prominent themes of objurgation, to huthern affairs, which, but for its extreme laugth, we should long ago have transferred to our columns. In this article Blackwood presents facts connected with the military enthusiasm of the South the unanimity of the Southern people in defence of tfluential periodical. When such a favorite organ of British thought and literature occupies such a position as that of Blackwood at this time upon the American controversy, it is a most significant illustration of a wonderful change in the public sptions, the whole public press of England, which is in that kingdom really and truly a mirror of public sentiment, from Blackwood, in the literary and the Times, in the political world, down to the humble organs of the laboring and manufacturing cla