hide Matching Documents

Your search returned 418 results in 64 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
ve Committee are not to be considered as endorsing, and the Society is not to be held responsible for everything which we publish. Indeed, we may sometimes publish what we differ from, on the principle that if errors endorsed by responsible names creep into our archives, they had better be published now, while men competent to correct them are living, than to turn up in future years when probably no one will be able to refute them. Our next (March) number. The recent attempt of Mr. Blaine to fire the Northern heart, by reviving the stories of Rebel barbarity to prisoners of war, and the eagerness with which the Radical press of the North caught up the old charge, and are still echoing it through the land, have made us feel that the time has come when this question of the treatment of prisoners during the late war should be fully ventilated, and our Confederate Government and people put right on the record concerning it. We shall, therefore, devote the next number of our pap
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
pointment. The leader of the Radical party (Mr. Blaine) has recently in his place in the United Sta, in which he ably refuted the assertions of Mr. Blaine, has been denounced by the Radical press as ent letter of ex-President Davis in reply to Mr. Blaine's charges: New Orleans, January 27, 18ulous falsehood by partisans of the class of Mr. Blaine, that, though I cannot say it has become to the circumstances of the case the fallacy of Mr. Blaine's statements. The published fact of an atte Wirz, for his life, would not make, but which Blaine, for the Presidential nomination, has made? he indictment found against me, but in which Mr. Blaine's fictions do not appear. The indictment waausible pretext for the reckless diatribe of Mr. Blaine. The papers preserved by Dr. Stevenson habrought against Mr. Davis, and reiterated by Mr. Blaine in his speech, we think he must be held alto from such antagonists and critics of his as Mr. Blaine. Having produced the testimony of reliab[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Colonel D. T. Chandler, (search)
on the skirts of their then rulers; and neither Mr. Garfield nor Mr. Blaine can change the record. I never heard that there was any particy were presented by Honorable B. H. Hill in his masterly reply to Mr. Blaine. Mr. Hill said: Now, will the gentleman believe testimony froime to prepare his rejoinder, and all of the authorities at hand, Mr. Blaine did not dare to deny them. He fully admitted their truth, and on the gentleman states. The substance of this extract is that Mr. Blaine does not deny the greater mortality of our prisoners in Northern w, if this explanation were true it would contain a fatal stab to Mr. Blaine's whole argument to prove Confederate cruelty to prisoners. If ote the tender nursing and kind, watchful care which (according to Mr. Blaine). they received at the hands of their captors, how could a Govern Rock Island, Camp Douglas, Camp Chase, &c., quite so pleasant as Mr. Blaine's rose-colored picture of Northern prisons would make it appear.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
s point from the writings alluded to, but we will only give an extract from the speech of Hon. James G. Blaine, uttered deliberately on the floor of the United States House of Representatives eleven yThousands of them say it--thousands of them; men of as high character as any in this House. Mr. Blaine. I take issue upon that. There is not one who can substantiate it — not one. As for measuresefore, is not Rebel testimony, but that of a Union soldier, and a truly loyal Republican, whom Mr. Blaine cannot dismiss with the cry of traitor. Testimony of a Federal soldier. Pioche, Februace to the treatment received by Confederates in Northern prisons. We think we have fairly met Mr. Blaine's issue, and that we have shown by incontrovertible testimony that Confederate prisoners were 24th January, 1876, publishes the following-letter from Judge Shea, which was called forth by Mr. Blaine's accusations on the floor of the House of Representatives. The Tribune introduces the letter
c bachelor, Senator Salisbury, and others. A number of members of Congress and their families were also in the house. Mr. and Mrs. James G. Blaine with their four children had a suite near ours. When Mrs. Blaine and I were out making calls, EmMrs. James G. Blaine with their four children had a suite near ours. When Mrs. Blaine and I were out making calls, Emmons, Alice, and little J. G. Blaine, Jr., and Dollie and baby John A. Logan, Jr., had fine times impersonating different distinguished men and women of whom they had heard their elders talk. Frequently we returned home to find confusion reigning suMrs. Blaine and I were out making calls, Emmons, Alice, and little J. G. Blaine, Jr., and Dollie and baby John A. Logan, Jr., had fine times impersonating different distinguished men and women of whom they had heard their elders talk. Frequently we returned home to find confusion reigning supreme in our rooms, the children having amused themselves by dressing up in their parents' clothes, playing grown — up people. Impromptu parties were organized, and the other children in the house invited to partake of the banquets they served thrJ. G. Blaine, Jr., and Dollie and baby John A. Logan, Jr., had fine times impersonating different distinguished men and women of whom they had heard their elders talk. Frequently we returned home to find confusion reigning supreme in our rooms, the children having amused themselves by dressing up in their parents' clothes, playing grown — up people. Impromptu parties were organized, and the other children in the house invited to partake of the banquets they served through the indulgence of Hughes, the head waiter, who was so devoted to General Logan and Mr. Blaine that their children could have whatever they wanted. Emmons presided over their affairs with much suavity of manner inherited from his knightly fathe
r men in Congress than there were then. Among the senators were Sumner, Wade, Chandler, Morton, Fessenden, Conkling, Morgan, Sherman, Morrill, Voorhees, Trumbull, Anthony, and Wilson. In the House were Garfield, Colfax, Butler, Brooks, Bingham, Blaine, Shellabarger, Wilson, Allison, Cullom, Logan, Ames, Hooper, Washburne, Boutwell, Randall, and Voorhees. Such men were earnest, thoughtful, patriotic and keenly alive to the interests of the country. They allowed nothing to pass that was in anyn, Cullom, Judd, Arnold, Singleton, Wentworth, Henderson, Farnsworth, Cook, Sherman, Schenck, Garfield, Grow, Shellabarger, Bingham, Archer, Thaddeus Stevens, Clymer, Williams, Colfax,Voorhees,Davis,Banks,Butler,WheelerWood, Slocum, Brooks, Frye, Blaine, Hale, Boutwell, Allison, Wilson of Iowa, and a score of others who were leaders of men and statesmen in every sense of the word. Before the Christmas holidays the breach between the President and Congress had widened so seriously that it was
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 10: (search)
question clamor against the military element Blaine elected speaker instance of his marvellous me, of California, was made sergeant-at-arms. Mr. Blaine was re-elected speaker of the House, and immJudd, and a legion too numerous to mention. Mr. Blaine was then young and vigorous, and probably thrious trouble than during any other period. Mr. Blaine was ever ready for any emergency, at times dable on account of its political character. Mr. Blaine was in the chair. As quick as a flash he be the floor. As soon as Tucker had finished, Mr. Blaine addressed the chair, saying: If the gentlemato ask him a question. Mr. Tucker assented. Mr. Blaine continued: Were you not attorney-general foriscussion. That evening we were dining with Mr. Blaine, and as I sat on his right I remarked to himo congratulate itself upon having elected James G. Blaine. Immediately after the inauguration e I Street, Zachary Chandler's on H Street, Speaker Blaine's in the row on Fifteenth Street between H
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 11: (search)
rps. The ladies of the cabinet who were not assisting in the reception accompanied their husbands and sustained themselves admirably as representative American women. In the throng there were such distinguished persons as Gail Hamilton-Mrs. Blaine's cousin-Sydney Hyde, Mary Clemmer Ames, Miss Foote, John W. Forney, Ben Perley Poore, and many other representatives of literary circles, while Senators Fenton, Conkling, Chandler, Bayard, Morton, Ferry, Howard, Drake, Carpenter, Thurman, Edmunds, Frelinghuysen, Fessenden, William Pitt Kellogg, and hosts of others represented the Senate. Of the House, there was Wilson, of Iowa; Frye and Blaine, of Maine; Hawley, of Connecticut; Pomeroy, of Kansas; Farnsworth and Burchard, of Illinois, and many others whose names are associated with the stirring events of that era. To this brilliant galaxy were added our army, navy, and marine corps, all in the full-dress uniforms of their respective branches — of the service, wearing all the me
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 12: (search)
blican convention nomination of Horace Greeley Mr. Greeley's Bereavement, defeat, illness, and death Grant's second inauguration the New cabinet death of my father. Politically excitement was running high. Rivals of President Grant were busy in the manufacture of all kinds of charges against and abuse of his administration. Unfortunately, some of his appointees had not conducted themselves as they should, and he was held responsible, though totally ignorant of their misdeeds. James G. Blaine was ambitious to be nominated for the Presidency, and it was said that he had used the speakership in every possible way to secure delegates to the national convention which was to nominate the candidates for President and Vice-President. There was never a more bitter campaign than that conducted before the holding of the national convention. President Grant's friends-General Logan among them — were so outraged at the methods that had been used that they allowed themselves no respite d
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 14: (search)
Republican convention of 1876 at Cincinnati Blaine's defeat and nomination of Hayes and Wheeler publican party who advocated the election of Mr. Blaine, and other prominent men, took an active par whose cause they advocated. Men opposed to Mr. Blaine retaliated by making grave charges as to hisconnection with various questionable schemes. Blaine's reading of the Mulligan letters on the floorring originally in a New York paper, showing Mr. Blaine as the Tatooed man, was without exception thncinnati in June, 876, and it was thought that Blaine, notwithstanding the intense abuse heaped uponhere for the purpose of advocating or opposing Blaine's election. General Granville M. Dodge recently explained how Blaine's defeat was really brought about. He was a Blaine delegate in the conventi was the beginning of the blunders that led to Blaine's Waterloo. McPherson, as Dodge had suspected for the wily politicians who were inimical to Blaine, and at a critical moment entertained a motion
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...