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icket line, and notified by an occasional bullet that the enemy was occupying the thick woods just in our front, and very near. A little over three months ago we were in the hurry, confusion, anxiety, and suspense of an undecided battle, surrounded by the dead and dying, with the enemy's long line of camp-fires before us. Since then we have had a quiet time, each succeeding day seeming the dullest. Rode into town this afternoon; invested twentyfive cents in two red apples; spoke to Captain Blair, of Reynolds' staff; exchanged nods with W. D. B., of the Commercial; saw a saddle horse run away with its rider; returned to camp; entertained Shanks, of the New York Herald, for ten minutes; drank a glass of wine with Colonel Taylor, Fifteenth Kentucky, and soon after dropped off to sleep. A brass band is now playing, away over on the Lebanon pike. The pontoniers are singing a psalm, with a view, doubtless, to making the oaths with which they intend to close the night appear more
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 8: the encampment. (search)
spicuous nor otherwise desirable as ours, a circumstance which had place in some further incidents of the field in the War for the Union. These troops were not the whole of Sherman's great Army of the West. The part of it which he brought here comprised many high names and titles, as well as stalwart men: the old Army of the Tennessee (once McPherson's, later Howard's, now under Logan), composed of the Fifteenth Corps, Hazen commanding (Sherman's old corps), and the Seventeenth Corps under Blair, together with the Army of Georgia, commanded now by Slocum, composed of the Fourteenth Corps (part of Thomas' old Army of the Cumberland), now under Davis, and the Twentieth Corps under Mower,--this latter composed of the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps of the Army of the Potomac sent to Sherman after Gettysburg, with Howard and Slocum. That part of Sherman's old army known as the Army of the Ohio, now commanded by Schofield, and made up of the Twenty-third Corps under Cox and the Tenth Corps
From the great ease of putting troops across the fords of the Potomac into Virginia, it was considered necessary to concentrate, at points from which they could be easily shifted, a sufficient reliable force to meet any such movement; and the two officers in whom the government had greatest confidence as tacticians, were sent to watch for and checkmate it. Meanwhile, Missouri had risen, the governor had declared the rights of the State infringed; and the movements of Generals Lyon and Blair-culminating in the St. Louis riots between the citizens and the Dutch soldiery-had put an end to all semblance of neutrality. Governor Jackson moved the state archives, and transferred the capital from Jefferson City to Boonesville. On the 13th of June he issued a proclamation calling for fifty thousand volunteers to defend the State of Missouri from Federal invasion; and appointed Sterling Price a major-general, with nine brigadiers, among whom were Jeff Thompson, Clark and Parsons. Perh
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 40: in front of Washington. (search)
kirmishing in the rear, between our cavalry and that of the enemy which was following, and on the afternoon of the 14th, there was some artillery firing by the enemy, across the river, at our cavalry which was watching the fords. Besides the money levied in Hagerstown and Frederick, which was subsequently very useful in obtaining supplies, we brought off quite a large number of beef cattle, and the cavalry obtained a number of horses, some being also procured for the artillery. On the night of the 13th the house of Postmaster General Blair near Silver Spring was burned, and it was assumed by the enemy that it was burned by my orders. I had nothing to do with it and do not yet know how the burning occurred. Though I believed that retaliation was justified by previous acts of the enemy, yet I did not wish to incur the risk of any license on the part of my troops and it was obviously impolitic to set the house on fire when we were retiring, as it amounted to notice of our movement.
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
l, 81, 82 Berkeley County, 366, 367, 368 Bermuda Hundreds, 360 Bernard House, 196 Berry, Major, 11, 240, 251 Berry's Ferry, 396 Berryville, 164, 240, 369, 396, 397, 406, 411, 414, 420, 421 Bethesda Church, 362, 363 Beverly, 459 Beverly's Ford, 106 Big Calf Pasture, 327 Big Lick, 377 Big Springs, 134 Blackburn's Ford, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20, 31, 32, 39, 118, 119 Black Horse Cavalry, 157 Black Walnut Run, 318 Blacksburg, 327, 329 Blair, Postmaster General, U. S., 395 Blue Ridge, 10, 11, 63, 164, 165, 238, 284, 285, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 377, 396, 411, 413, 429, 433, 434, 457, 458, 459, 476 Board, Colonel, 397 Bolivar, 384 Bolivar Heights, 136, 137, 164, 384 Bonham, General, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 15, 20, 27, 31, 33, 38, 51, 52 Boonsboro, Pa., 135, 139, 140, 254, 282, 385 Boonsboro Gap, 386 Boteler, Honorable A. R., 401, 478 Boteler's Ford, 139, 153, 162, 254 Botetourt County, 369 Bower's Hi
and her family, had known me from childhood. I was always kindly received by the General, and one day he asked me if I would be willing to accept the colonelcy of a certain Ohio regiment if he secured the appointment. I gladly told him yes, if General Halleck would let me go; but I was doomed to disappointment, for in about a week or so afterward General Sherman informed me that the Governor of Ohio would not consent, having already decided to appoint some one else. A little later Governor Blair, of Michigan, who was with the army temporarily in the interest of the troops from his State, and who just at this time was looking around for a colonel for the Second Michigan Cavalry, and very anxious to get a regular officer, fixed upon me as the man. The regiment was then somewhat run down by losses from sickness, and considerably split into factions growing out of jealousies engendered by local differences previous to organization, and the Governor desired to bridge over all these t
ing the information obtained by scouts and reconnoitring parties, and he came often to Rienzi to see me in relation to this and other matters. Previously I had not had much personal association with Granger. While I was at Halleck's headquarters we met on one or two occasions, and the day I joined the Second Michigan at Farmington I saw him for a few moments, but, with such slight exception, our intercourse had been almost exclusively official. He had suggested my name, I was told, to Governor Blair, when the Governor was in search of an officer of the regular army to appoint to the colonelcy of the Second Michigan Calvalry, but his recommendation must have been mainly based on the favorable opinions he had heard expressed by General Halleck and by some of the officers of his staff, rather than from any personal knowledge of my capacity. Of course I was very grateful for this, but some of his characteristics did not impress me favorably, and I sometimes wished the distance between
crossed Bayou Pierre on a log, and at last reached Grand Gulf, eight miles distant. He was completely exhausted, and fainted on arriving there. He gave information of the designs of the rebels and it was forwarded to General Grant, thereby saving, probably, a most valuable train from the hands of the enemy. Major Kiernan has been warmly recommended by high officials of the army of the Tennessee and department of the Missouri to the President for promotion. Governor Gamble, Generals Grant, Blair, Schofield, Hurlbut, Sullivan, and half a dozen others of rank, bear testimony to the gallantry of his services, and unite in asking the Government to recognize them by his advancement. Rev. Mr. Breckinridge, when taken to General Grant's headquarters, had an interview with that officer, which resulted in the unconditional release of himself and sons. Permission was also given him to return to Oakland, take the female members of his family and remove them to Kentucky, or to any place in
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter3 (search)
end of November the effective total of the troops of the Department of Northern Virginia was forty-seven thousand two hundred, of whom four thousand eight hundred belonged to the Acquia district, and three. thousand seven hundred to that of the Valley. The figures are taken from the return in my possession. Brigadier-General D. H. Hill had succeeded Brigadier-General Evans in the command of the troops near Leesburg, the latter being transferred to South Carolina. Early in December, Major Blair, the chief commissary of the army, was compelled by ill health to leave that position. He was succeeded in it by Major R. G. Cole, who assumed its duties about the 20th of the month, and continued to perform them until the end of the war. He was desired to have the stock of provision for the army increased to a supply for fifteen days, and to have that quantity kept on hand; and also to establish a reserve-depot at Culpepper Court-House. This measure was a preparation for the contingenc
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
's Depot to attack him in rear. He determined, therefore, to concentrate his own forces and fall upon General Pemberton's. For that object, McPherson with two divisions at Jackson, McClernand with three at Raymond, Hovey with one at Clinton, and Blair with one at New Auburn, were ordered, on the 15th, to march to Bolton's Depot, eight miles from Edwards's. After receiving, at Bovina, early in the morning of the 14th, my order of the night before, directing him to march upon Clinton, Generabout noon.-until near noon-when they were attacked by General Grant, who had then completed the concentration of his forces, uninterrupted by his adversary. When McPherson, with two divisions, had come up, and McClernand with four, including Blair's of Sherman's corps, was within an hour's march of the field, the action was begun by Hovey's division, which assailed the left and centre of Stevenson's. Logan's division, moving by the right of Hovey's, passed the left of Stevenson's line as i
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