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Meanwhile Congress assembled. Senators and representatives, with more zeal than knowledge, caught up and reiterated the cry, On to Richmond. The impatient Congressmen were leading and influential. They waited upon the President to complain of the inactivity of the army, and upon General Scott, urging him On to Richmond. Army bills, prepared with deliberation by Senator Wilson, (in accordance with the views of the Government,) were emasculated by the House Military Committee, of which Mr. Blair is Chairman. The President and his Cabinet had reason to apprehend — if not the censures of Congress — the failure of measures essential to the prosecution of the war, unless the Tribune order of On to Richmond was obeyed. And now the sensation journals began to disparage the strength and courage of the rebel army. The rebels will not fight! The cowards will run! &c., &c., appeared in flaming capitals over flash paragraphs. The whole popular mind was swayed by these frenzied appeals
ield, he met a member of my staff, and called out, For God's sake, support my regiment. Lieut.-Col. Blair, Second Kansas.--This excellent soldier took command of the regiment when Col. Mitchell waopened the engagement. On the sides of the first ridge on the western side of the valley, Colonel Blair's regiment, at ten minutes after six o'clock, encountered a heavy force of infantry, not lestle. Totten's battery then threw a few balls as feelers, to draw out the enemy's cannon. Colonel Blair's regiment moved forward, and were soon met by a well-equipped regiment of Louisiana troops, ground in scores, while all who could were glad to run for dear life. The gallant men in Colonel Blair's regiment were now ordered back, and their position taken by the Iowa First. General Lyon hsing force, who had already been started upon a full retreat by the thick raining bullets of Colonel Blair's boys. Lieut. Dubois' battery, four pieces, had also opened on the eastern slope, firing u
ng silent after ours had opened the engagement. On the sides of the first ridge on the western side of the valley, Colonel Blair's regiment, at ten minutes after six o'clock, encountered a heavy force of infantry, not less than a full regiment, ain participate in the battle. Totten's battery then threw a few balls as feelers, to draw out the enemy's cannon. Colonel Blair's regiment moved forward, and were soon met by a well-equipped regiment of Louisiana troops, whom, after a bitter conring them lifeless on the ground in scores, while all who could were glad to run for dear life. The gallant men in Colonel Blair's regiment were now ordered back, and their position taken by the Iowa First. General Lyon had previously had a poor e distraction of the opposing force, who had already been started upon a full retreat by the thick raining bullets of Colonel Blair's boys. Lieut. Dubois' battery, four pieces, had also opened on the eastern slope, firing upon a force which was ret
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 206.-U. S. Executive Government, 1861-65. (search)
Doc. 206.-U. S. Executive Government, 1861-65. Abraham Lincoln, of Ill., President. Hannibal Hamlin, of Me., Vice-President. Secretary of State.--William H. Seward, of N. Y. Secretary of Treasury.--Salmon P. Chase, of Ohio. Secretary of Interior.--Caleb B. Smith, of Indiana. Secretary of Navy.--Gideon Welles, of Conn. Secretary of War.--Simon Cameron, of Penn. Attorney-General.--Edward Bates, of Mo. P. M. General.--Montgomery Blair, of Mo.