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adjutant-general of the corps, being selected out of many designs, submitted by Major-General A. J. Smith, the corps commander, and, in his honor, named the A. J. Smith cross. It is easily distinguished from the Maltese cross, in being bounded by curved instead of straight lines. No order for its adoption was issued. The badge of the Seventeenth Corps, said to have been suggested by General M. F. Ford, and adopted in accordance with General Orders issued by his commander, Major-General Francis P. Blair, was an arrow. He says, In its swiftness, in its surety of striking where wanted, and its destructive powers, when so intended, it is probably as emblematical of this corps as any design that could be adopted. The order was issued at Goldsboro, N. C., March 25, 1865. The order further provides that the arrow for divisions shall be two inches long, and for corps headquarters one and one-half inches long, and further requires the wagons and ambulances to be marked with the badge
John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life, XX.
Army road
and bridge Builders. (search)
One of the earliest pontons used in the Rebellion was made of India-rubber. It was a sort of sack, shaped not unlike a torpedo, which had to be inflated before use. When thus inflated, two of these sacks were placed side by side, and on this buoyant foundation the bridge was laid. Their extreme lightness was a great advantage in transportation, but for some reason they were not used by the engineers of the Army of the Potomac. They were used in the western army, however, somewhat. General F. P. Blair's division used them in the Vicksburg campaign of 1863. Another ponton which was adopted for bridge service may be described as a skeleton boat-frame, over which was stretched a cotton-canvas cover. This was a great improvement over the tin or copper-covered boat-frames, which had been thoroughly tested and condemned. It was the variety used by Sherman's army almost exclusively. In starting for Savannah, he distributed his ponton trains among his four corps, giving to each abo
nces, 302-15 Anderson, Robert, 22 Andrew, John A., 23, 25 Antietam, 71,176,253, 286,287, 378 Ashby, Mass., 274 Atkinson, D. Webster, 392 Atlanta, 400,403,405 Avery House, 402 Baltimore, 116 Banks, Nathaniel P., 23, 71 Beale, James, The Battle Flags of the Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg, 338-39 Beats, 94-102, 174,312 Bell, John, 16 Belle Plain, Va., 369 Benham, Henry W., 391 Big Shanty, Ga., 404 Birney, David B., 157,255-56,261, 345,353 Blair, Francis P., 264, 383 Borden's Milk, 125 Boston, 25,29-30,51, 199,226 Bounty-jumpers, 161-62,202 Bowditch, Henry I., 315 Boxford, Mass., 44 Boydton Plank Road, 313 Bragg, Braxton, 262 Brandy Station, Va., 113, 180,229, 352-53 Bristoe Station, Va., 367 Brown, Joseph W., 403 Buchanan, James, 18-19,395 Buell, Don Carlos, 405 Bugle calls, 165-66, 168-69, 172, 176-78,180-97,336-38 Burgess' Tavern, Va., 313 Burnside, Ambrose E., 71-72,100, 260-61 Butterfield, Da