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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 3 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Francis Preston Blair or search for Francis Preston Blair in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
of the first guns salute them as they reach there. We strike at Glass's Mill, and plunging through the Chickamauga, leave on its banks a holocaust of dead. 'Tis Blair meeting a fate he had just predicted, and Morel, and Anderson, and Belsom, and Bailey and Daigle! We laid them shrouded in their blankets, and move to strike eld crushed guns that show what fire we took unflinchingly, while pouring canister alone upon their charging lines. Breckinridge thanks us on the field. To replace Blair, Vaught now stands promoted, and Chickamauga's victory led us but to Missionary Ridge. Dissensions and rivalries have brought defeat. The Fifth, unmoved, indigna, their reward, their pride, from your gallant acts, your heroic bearing, your friendly approbation? Boys of the Fifth Company, the spirits of Slocomb, Vaught and Blair at this moment marshal our brave who roam enfranchised, and reecho my words, rejoicing at this first reunion of the Fifth and its brothers of Virginia. May God bl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
of the first guns salute them as they reach there. We strike at Glass's Mill, and plunging through the Chickamauga, leave on its banks a holocaust of dead. 'Tis Blair meeting a fate he had just predicted, and Morel, and Anderson, and Belsom, and Bailey and Daigle! We laid them shrouded in their blankets, and move to strike eld crushed guns that show what fire we took unflinchingly, while pouring canister alone upon their charging lines. Breckinridge thanks us on the field. To replace Blair, Vaught now stands promoted, and Chickamauga's victory led us but to Missionary Ridge. Dissensions and rivalries have brought defeat. The Fifth, unmoved, indigna, their reward, their pride, from your gallant acts, your heroic bearing, your friendly approbation? Boys of the Fifth Company, the spirits of Slocomb, Vaught and Blair at this moment marshal our brave who roam enfranchised, and reecho my words, rejoicing at this first reunion of the Fifth and its brothers of Virginia. May God bl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Our fallen comrades. (search)
nds of the noble wife of that gallant chief, whose untimely death will ever be lamented, not only by this command, but by all of the people of this great city, and of this State—by all good men and women everywhere, who love courage, fidelity and patriotism. There are other leaders among our honored dead whose names and leadership are worthy to be associated with that of our beloved Captain, and those names are already upon the lips of the veterans around me. I mean Lieutenants Vaught and Blair; Sergeants De-Merrett, Denegre, and others of the Fifth Company. Under this flag they led our comrades to victory, and during all of the war showed that they were soldiers without fear, and gentlemen without reproach. There are still other names both among the dead and the living which deserve to be mentioned as associated with this precious relic. The living are among you. Your eyes and hearts turn to them without naming them. The officers and men of the Fifth Company feel that the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
can have undergone more trying ordeal, or met it with higher spirit of heroic sacrifice. There was naught on earth that could swerve Robert E. Lee from the path where, to his clear comprehension, honor and duty lay. To the statesman, Mr. Francis Preston Blair, who brought him the tender of supreme command, he answered: Mr. Blair, I look upon secession as anarchy. If I owned the four millions of slaves in the South, I would sacrifice them all to the Union. But how can I draw my sword agaMr. Blair, I look upon secession as anarchy. If I owned the four millions of slaves in the South, I would sacrifice them all to the Union. But how can I draw my sword against Virginia? Draw his sword against Virginia? Perish the thought! Over all the voices that called him he heard the still small voice that ever whispers to the soul of the spot that gave it birth, and of her who gave it suck; and over every ambitious dream, there rose the face of the angel that guards the door of home. On the 20th of April, as soon as the news of Virginia's secession reached him, he resigned his commission in the army of the United States, and thus wrote to his sister
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The friendship between Lee and Scott. (search)
ed all of his powers of persuasion to induce him to adhere to the Union and serve under the old flag, and finally Francis Preston Blair (at General Scott's suggestion) was sent by Mr. Lincoln to offer him the supreme command of the United States armhat I desired the command of the United States Army, nor did I ever have a conversation with but one gentleman, Mr. Francis Preston Blair, on the subject, which was at his invitation, and, as I understood, at the instance of President Lincoln. Afdeprecating war, I could take no part in an invasion of the Southern States. I went directly from the interview with Mr. Blair to the office of General Scott, told him of the proposition that had been made to me, and my decision. Upon reflectike of his life. Lee expressed the highest respect for General Scott and for his opinions, repeated what he had said to Mr. Blair, that while he recognized no necessity for the state of things then existing, and would gladly liberate the slaves of t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee and Scott. (search)
, and replied, General Scott, I will conclude what I came to say. I am awaiting the action of the State of Virginia. If Virginia stands by the old flag and the Union, I shall stand by them with my sword and my life. If Virginia shall secede, I shall go with her. I hold my loyalty as due to Virginia. Governor Anderson then proceeded to say that this fact rested not only upon the statement of General Scott, but that he has since seen in the report of a Congressional committee that Francis P. Blair, Sr., had made the statement; that on the next day—General Scott meanwhile having reported to Mr. Lincoln this interview with Colonel Lee—Mr. Blair went from Mr. Lincoln to Colonel Lee, and repeated in the same words the same offer, and received the same answer. Upon these facts Governor Anderson specified the following justifications of that high estimate of General Lee's rare virtue, which might seem at first thought to be a mere extravagance in personal or partisan admiration: First