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test of courage, endurance, and discipline. But our gallant volunteers gave evidence of qualities which inspires the Commander-in-Chief with perfect confidence in them. Surely they have been tried in fire and have not been found wanting. Yorktown, Williamsburgh, Fair Oaks and Fair Oaks Farm attest their unflinching firmness and courage. Among the few incidents of the battle which deserve conspicuous attention, it is pleasant to rescue from oblivion one involving a humble private. Charles Blake, company E, Seventh Massachusetts, was severely wounded in the shoulder, but not disabled. He was sent to the field-hospital, and when his wound was dressed, he resumed his musket and pushed into the fight again, against the remonstrances of the surgeon. Not long afterwards he was brought back on a stretcher with a disabling wound in the leg. During the afternoon Gen. McClellan took a seat on the parapet of a redoubt in front of Hooker's intrenchments. Several Brigadiers, staff-off
ated, leaving their dead men lying in the road, and to-day they have sent in a flag of truce to obtain permission to bury them. On my way in, I met an artillery and infantry force going out under Brig.-Gen. Benton, but it was too dark for him to travel, and he halted. My officers and men are entitled to great praise, and fought with the most perfect coolness and determination. I had with me Majors Humphrey and Wallis, (wounded,) Captains Gifford, Chidister, Knight, (wounded;) Cameron, Blake, more, and Booth; Adjutant Stevenson; Battalion Adjutant Blackburn, (wounded,) Lieuts. Harrington, Shear, Ellsworth, Bayley, and Shattuck, all of the Ninth Illinois cavalry. My guide, William McCulloch, Sergeant-Major Price, Battalion Sergeant-Majors Knight and Roberts, and Chief Bugler Fritson also behaved admirably. I was struck with a rifle-ball in the breast, which sickened me for a time, but I soon recovered from its effects sufficiently to give orders. My wounded men were well
was to cross the marsh at the causeway nearest Secessionville, drive the enemy as far as the lower causeway [nearest Stono] rapidly recross the marsh at that point by a flank movement, and cut off and capture the force encamped at Grimball's. Col. C. H. Way, Fifty-fourth Georgia, with eight hundred men, was to follow and co-operate. A reserve of one company of cavalry, one of infantry, and a section of artillery, was at Rivers's house. Two Napoleon guns each, of the Chatham Artillery, and Blake's Battery, and four twelve-pounders of the Siege Train, supported by four hundred infantry, were to attack the gunboats Pawnee and Marblehead in the Stono River. In the gray of early dawn of July 16, the troops in bivouac on James Island were awakened by dropping shots, and then heavy firing on the picket line to the right. Clambering to the top of a pile of cracker-boxes, an officer of the Fifty-fourth, looking in the direction of the firing, saw the flashes of musketry along the outpo
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Chapter 5: the greater assault on Wagner. (search)
ial party. Soon after, his body was carried out via the sally-port on the left river-front, and conveyed across the front of our works, and there buried. . . . His watch and chain were robbed from his body by a private in my company, by name Charles Blake. I think he had other personal property of Colonel Shaw. . . . Blake, with other members of my company, jumped our works at night after hostilities had ceased, and robbed the dead. . . . Colonel Shaw was the only officer buried with the coloBlake, with other members of my company, jumped our works at night after hostilities had ceased, and robbed the dead. . . . Colonel Shaw was the only officer buried with the colored troops. . . . Such disposal of the remains of an officer of Colonel Shaw's rank, when his friends were almost within call, was so unusual and cruel that there seemed good ground for the belief that the disposition made was so specially directed, as a premeditated indignity for having dared to lead colored troops. When known throughout the North, it excited general indignation, and fostered bitterness. Though recognizing the fitness of his resting-place, where in death he was not separate
r. His skirmishers received the fire of the enemy's vedettes, drove them, and captured some prisoners and horses. Unknown to us, a force of the enemy was stationed every night at Rivers's Causeway, which this morning was composed of two guns of Blake's Battery under Lieutenant De Lorme, posted in a small fieldwork and supported by fifteen men of the Palmetto Siege Train under Lieutenant Spivey, besides the picket reserves. Our force was received with an unexpected fire of grape-shot and muskutually supporting and detached fieldworks for artillery united by curtains for infantry. The enemy's force comprised some Georgia Volunteers, Lucas's battalion, the South Carolina Siege Train, detachments of the Second South Carolina Artillery, Blake's battery, and the Chatham Artillery. Brig.-Gen. Wm. B. Taliaferro, commanding James Island, made drafts on the garrisons of Fort Johnson, and Batteries Haskell and Tatom, to supplement the small force on the lines. He states that his available
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Roster of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
sin.; farmer; Boston. 28 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Van Allen, Charles 29, mar.; farmer; Lenox. 27 Feb 63; killed 5 Sep 63 in trenches before Ft. Wagner. $50. Van Alstyne, Charles 22, mar.; laborer; Hudson, N Y 5 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Van Blake, John 21, sin.; laborer; Pittsfield. 6 Mch 63; died 21 Dec 63 Morris Id. S. C. Consumption. $50. Vernonhaus, Alexander 29, sin.; seaman; Philadelphia. 3 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Vosburgh, John E. 24, sin.; blacksmith; Lenox. 4 Mch 63; d Jly 63 Ft. Wagner, S. C.; supposed killed. $50. Ballard, Jacob 29, mar.; farmer; Philadelphia. 12 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. $50. Barcus, Ezekiel L. 36, mar.; brickmaker; Philadelphia. 11 Mch 63.; died 10 Dec 63 Morris Id. S. C. dysentery. $50. Blake, Lemuel 21, sin.; farmer; W. Chester, Pa. 9 Mch 63; 20 Aug 65. Captd. 16 Jly 63 James Id. S. C.; ex. 4 Mch 65 Goldsboro, N. C.; ret. 7 Je 65. $50. Bond, Benjamin M. 38, mar.; cook; Boston. 5 Dec 63; 20 Aug 65. $325. Bosley, Joseph E. 30,
and only negro slaves reported captured to be amenable. In the action at James Island, S. C., July 16, 1863, the Fifty-fourth Mass. Infantry was the only colored regiment which sustained losses. The Confederates reported fourteen negro prisoners captured. Our own reports, however, give but thirteen men as missing, who are all accounted for as captured in the roster compiled for this history, from data gathered since the reports were made. The list is as below:— List of prisoners. Blake, Lemuel. Private, Co. B; exchanged March 4, 1865, at Goldsboro, N. C.; returned to regiment, June 7, 1865. Caldwell, James. Private, Co. H; exchanged March 4, 1865, at Goldsboro, N. C.; discharged, May 8, 1865, at Boston. counsel, George. Private, Co B; exchanged, March 4, 1865, at Goldsboro, N. C.; returned to regiment, June 7, 1865. Dickinson, John W. Private, Co. H; exchanged, March 4, 1865, at Goldsboro, N. C.; discharged with regiment. Harrison, William Henry, 1st. Priva
C., 304. Birney, William, 193, 199, 208, 210, 212. Black Committee, 11, 140, 181. Black Island, S. C., 129, 186, 187, 189,191, 192, 207, 213, 219, 234. Black River, S. C. 291, 292. Blair, Frank, 266, 271. Blair's Landing, S. C., 255. Blake, Charles, 98. Blau, Gustav, 211. Block House No. 1, 191, 192, 193. Blockade running, 194,195. Bloody Bridge, S. C., 214, 215. Blue House, S. C., 277. Bluff Battery, 129, 134. Boat Infantry, 119, 188. Boat reconnoissance of Sumter, 139. rth (colored), 107, 111. (See also 21st U. S. Colored Troops). South Carolina Troops (Confederate). Artillery, Heavy: Lucas' Battalion, 203. Eighteenth Battalion (Siege Train), 56, 203. Regiments: First, 69,110, 139, 190. First (Batteries) A (Blake's), 56, 70, 200, 203. Second, 203. Artillery, Light: Palmetto Battalion, 200. Palmetto (Batteries) G (DePass'), 70, 242. German Battalion, 257. Batteries: Beaufort, 242. Lafayette, 242. Marion, 56, 61, 212. Cavalry: Third, 208, 238. Infantr
Sent to Capt. Coke. --A man named Charles Blake, arrested on Wednesday last as a Yankee deserter, in a drunken condition, was arraigned before His Honor yesterday for examination. Blake asserted that he deserted from Washington city about three years ago and entered our own service. He had pursued the occupation of shoemaker for some time at Culpeper C. H., until he was discharged. Since that time he had been conscripted and sent to Camp Lee. The Mayor ordered him to be taken before C, arrested on Wednesday last as a Yankee deserter, in a drunken condition, was arraigned before His Honor yesterday for examination. Blake asserted that he deserted from Washington city about three years ago and entered our own service. He had pursued the occupation of shoemaker for some time at Culpeper C. H., until he was discharged. Since that time he had been conscripted and sent to Camp Lee. The Mayor ordered him to be taken before Capt. Coke, the enrolling officer for this district.
a calf, valued at $380, from Mr. Wellington Goddin. Mr. Goddin stated that the calf had been killed in his cow-house last Monday night week and carried off. A negro woman named Hoster, who lives in the same house with Allen, said that on the night that the calf was stolen the accused were at her house together. The next morning she saw blood in her pig trough and yard, and told Allen about it, who immediately tried to cover up the blood with ashes. The accused were given 39 each. Charles Blake and John Hagan, two small white boys, were fined $5 each for beating a little negro in the street. Fanny, slave to Mrs. Heller, was ordered to be whipped for using insolent language to Mrs. Elizabeth Minson. James Pitman Tyler, clerk of the Second Market, was charged with huckstering in the said market. It seems that Mr. Tyler recently brought from the country a box of fowls belonging to Mrs. Bowon, of Nelson, and gave them to R. F. Kirby to sell. In this box he had five
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