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June 12, 1840; d. Oct. 1, 1841.  108Edwin, b. Apr. 5, 1842.  109Azelia, b. June 6, 1844.  110Franklin G. b. Sept. 8, 1846. 64-92Charles O. Whitmore m. Lovice Ayres, and had--  92-111Charles J., b. Apr. 27, 1834.  112William H., b. Sept. 6, 1836.  113Martha H., b. Sept. 5, 1838.  114Anna L., b. Sept. 16, 1840.  115Charlotte R., b. Mar. 9, 1843.  116Creighton, b. Dec. 16, 1845; d. Apr. 25, 1848.   His wife dying Sept. 27, 1849, he m., 2d, Oct. 30, 1851, Mary E. Blake, widow of George Blake, jun., of Boston, who has by her first husband two daughters.  1WIER, Eleazer, and Catharine, had--  1-2Elizabeth, b. July 11, 1696.  3Susanna, b. May 8, 1699.  4Eliot, b. May 16, 1701.  5Prudence, b. May 18, 1703.  6Catharine, b. Mar. 16, 1706.  1wild, Silas, of Braintree, was b. Mar. 8, 1736. He m., 1st, Ruth Thayer, who d. Dec. 29, 1793; leaving--   Sarah.   Jonathan.    Paul,b. Jan. 13, 1762. Silas,  1-2   He m., 2d, Sarah Kingman, of Weymouth.
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
afterwards Governor of Massachusetts, was chairman. With him were associated John Phillips, at that time President of the Senate of Massachusetts— a name dear to every friend of the slave as the father of him to whose eloquent voice we hope to listen to-night—Timothy Bigelow, Speaker of the House of Representatives, William Gray, Henry Dearborn, Josiah Quincy, Daniel Webster, William Ward, of Medford, William Prescott, Thomas H. Perkins, Stephen White, Benjamin Pickman, William Sullivan, George Blake, David Cummings, James Savage, John Gallison, James T. Austin, and Henry Orne. A committee, more calculated to inspire the confidence of all sides, could not have been appointed. Numerous as were its members, they were all men of mark, high in the confidence and affections of the country. This committee reported the following resolutions, which were adopted by the meeting:— Resolved, As the opinion of this meeting, that the Congress of the United States possess the constitutional<
afterwards Governor of Massachusetts, was chairman. With him were associated John Phillips, at that time President of the Senate of Massachusetts— a name dear to every friend of the slave as the father of him to whose eloquent voice we hope to listen to-night—Timothy Bigelow, Speaker of the House of Representatives, William Gray, Henry Dearborn, Josiah Quincy, Daniel Webster, William Ward, of Medford, William Prescott, Thomas H. Perkins, Stephen White, Benjamin Pickman, William Sullivan, George Blake, David Cummings, James Savage, John Gallison, James T. Austin, and Henry Orne. A committee, more calculated to inspire the confidence of all sides, could not have been appointed. Numerous as were its members, they were all men of mark, high in the confidence and affections of the country. This committee reported the following resolutions, which were adopted by the meeting:— Resolved, As the opinion of this meeting, that the Congress of the United States possess the constitutional<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
s bold attempt to kick the memorial out of the chamber, and to trample under foot the sacred right of petition and remonstrance, excited the strongest general indignation among the members. It made at once many abolition converts, and was overruled for good, great and lasting good. A very spirited debate ensued, in the course of which Mr. Walley received a severe castigation, and stood alone in his infamous proposition. That debate was worth more than a thousand dollars to our cause. George Blake, of Boston, (though opposed to the abolitionists), said that our fundamental principles were incontrovertible; that slavery could not long continue in our land; that it stood on the same level with the Genthoo sacrifices; and that he did not believe a man, or any body of men, could be found in that assembly, who would dare to propose any law, or any resolutions, censuring the antislavery society, or any other. Mr. Rantoul of Gloucester, Mr. Foster of Brimfield, Mr. Hillard of Boston, Mr.
ention, 372, favors anti-pro-slavery-church resolutions, 380; speaks at meeting of British and Foreign A. S. S., 382, 383, at S. Gurney's, 387; discredits G. in England, 431; return to U. S., 431; vote for President, 428, 436. Black, Adam [1784-1874], publisher of Quarterly Review, 2.395, at breakfast to G., 397. Blagden, George Washington, Rev. [d. 1884, aged 83], pro-slavery, 2.105, succeeded by Fitch, 136, charged with slaveholding, 137, 163. Blair, James [d. 1834], 1.303. Blake, George, 2.103. Blanchard, Abijah, Rev., 1.278. Blanchard, Joshua P. [d. 1868, aged 86], conservative peace man, 2.226, on business com. of Peace Convention, 227; repudiates Non-Resistance Soc., 242. Bond, George, 2.189. Borden, Nathaniel B. [b. Fall River, Mass., Apr. 15, 1801; d. there Apr. 10, 1865], on Third Party, 2.31, reflection opposed by it, 436, 437.— Letters to G., and F. Jackson, 2.311. Borthwick, Peter, 1.356. Boston (Mass.), G.'s first visit, 1.51, second, 72, third, 73,
ed, later. Chester Ellis. Chief of Caissons, Lieut. Robt. L. Sawin. (1st Lieut. 1862, on Staff of Chief of Artillery, 1863.) Second section--left. Lieut. J. Henry Sleeper, Commanding. (Commissioned Captain Tenth Massachusetts Battery, Sept., 1862). Second Detachment.—Sergt. Jas. Sinclair; Gunner, Jas. S. Rowland; Died since muster out. Chief of Caisson, Harry Warren. Privates, Stephen H. Reynolds, Received a warrant, later. Wounded. Discharged for disability. Geo. Blake, Received a warrant, later. Died since muster out. Geo. V. Brooke, Discharged for disability. Wilbur F. Bates, Died since muster out. Amos Colby, Received a warrant, later. Alfred A. Young, Received a warrant, later. Died since muster out. Wm. A. Ham, Chas. Lynde, Died since muster out. Thos. J. Covell, Received a warrant, later. Discharged for disability. Died since muster out. Willard Pettengill, Received a warrant, later. Jno. Clark, Killed or died
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
e was obliged, according to his present argument about the four States, to vote for her admission with or without slavery; but his vote stands nay. But it would be a long work to expose his shiftless course,— everything by starts, and nothing long. Mr. Leavitt, of the Independent, talks of taking him in hand, and exposing the double dealings of his life. I wish he might do it through the Post. When you have done with the pamphlet, please return it. Of the committee who reported it were George Blake, now dead, who was a leading Republican; Josiah Quincy, Federalist, late President of Harvard College; James T. Austin, Republican, late Attorney-General of Massachusetts; and John Gallison, a lawyer, who died soon after, but of whom there are most grateful traditions in the profession. 1 admired particularly the article on Webster, written shortly after the speech. It must have been done by Mr. Dix. John A. Dix. Sumner was probably at fault in this conjecture. Aut Erasmus aut Diabol
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
and happiness. Faneuil Hall could be filled with an eager and intelligent crowd at any moment of day or night. Town meetings were often continued two or three days, morning and evening. Caucuses were constantly held on Sunday evenings, and often it was necessary to adjourn from the small hall, where they might have been collected, to the Old South Church, for greater space. The orators were eloquent, and sometimes adverse parties met to discuss questions together. Governor Eustis, Mr. George Blake, and others on one side; Mr. H. G. Otis, Mr. Samuel Dexter, Mr. William Sullivan, on the other. All the speeches were extemporaneous; it would have lowered a man's reputation materially if it had been supposed that he had prepared and committed a speech to memory. Such a thing was never known; and no one thought of reporting any speech. Mr. Otis was a very captivating speaker; handsome, gesticulating gracefully, with a beautiful voice and fervent manner, he excited an audience somet
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
ofessor at Harvard College, 351, 352. Beck, Professor, 108. Beckford, William, 246 and note. Bedford, Sixth Duke of, 268-270. Belem Church and Convent, 244. Bell, J., 248, 249. Bell, John, 173, 174, 180. Bell, Joseph, 7. Benci, 174. Benecke, Professor, 70, 76, 79, 82. Berchet, Giovanni, 450. Berg, President von, 122. Berlin, visits, 109, 493-503. Bernard, General, 350. Bertrand, Favre, 153, 155. Bigelow, Dr., Jacob, 12, 316 note, 319. Bigelow, Timothy, 13. Blake, George, 20. Bligh, President, 372. Blumenbach, Madame, 103. Blumenbach, Professor, 70, 71, 80, 85, 94, 103-105, 121. Blumner, Madame de, 481. Bohl von Faber, 236 and note. Bologna, visits, 166. Bombelles, Count H., 246, 247. Bonaparte, Christine (Countess Posse), 182, 183 note, 446 Bonaparte, Emperor Napoleon I., return from Elba, 49; Dr. Parr on, 50; Byron's feeling for, 60; anecdotes of, 61, 123. Bonaparte, Jerome, King of Westphalia, 83, 84, 111. Bonaparte, Letizia (Mad
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
, II. 101. Berg. President von, I. 122. Berlin, visits, I. 109, 493-503, II. 313, 314, 330, 331-333. Bernard, General, I. 350. Bernstorff, Count and Countess, II. 373. Berryer, P. A. . II. 130, 138. Bertrand, Favre, I. 153, 155. Bethune, Mademoiselle de, II. 125. Bigelow, Dr., Jacob, I. 12, 316 note, 319, II. 438, 493. Bigelow, J. P., II. 305. Bigelow, Timothy, I. 13. Binney, Horace, II. 37, 46. Birkbeck, Dr , II. 178. Blacas, Duchess de, II. 348, 856. Blake, George, I. 20. Bland, Robert, verses by, II. 482 note, 483. Bligh, President, I. 372. Bliss, Mrs., II. 263. Blumenbach, Madame, I. 103. Blumenbach, Professor, I. 70, 71, 80, 85, 94, 103, 104, 105, 121. Blumner, Madame de, I. 481. Boccaccio's house at Certaldo, II. 91. Bodenhausen, II. 6. Bohl von Faber, I. 236 and note. Bologna, visits, I. 166, II. 47. Bolognetti-Cenci, Count and Countess, II 71. Bombelles. Count, II. 35, 49. Bombelles, Count, Henri, 1. 246, 247, I
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