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y, and broke through the dense timber and brush which for a mile and a half fringed the borders of the creek. By throwing a force through their centre their forces were divided, part being driven east toward Arrow Rock, and part, under Shelby, to the northwest — both bodies pursued by our victorious troops. I was misinformed when I reported to you by telegraph to-day that the enemy's artillery had been captured. We got his best gun, an iron ten-pounder, (Parrott pattern,) originally in Bledsoe's battery; but he succeeded in getting away with one piece, a brass six-pounder, (since captured,) that was captured at Springfield on the eighth of January. I am unable to give you a correct account of the killed and wounded. Ours, including all our losses from Cole Camp to the place and the fight of to-day, will not exceed thirty. Of the enemy, I am officially advised that fifty-three dead have been found in the brush, and seventy wounded, who have been left at the hospitals here and
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
aged for several hours, Price moved from Warrensburg toward Lexington, and that night encamped two or three miles from the city. Three he rested until dawn, Sept. 12, 1861. in the National pickets, and opened a cannonade, with the batteries of Bledsoe and Parsons, upon Mulligan's intrenched camp from four different points. Their fire was at first concentrated upon the stronger works at the college Siege of Lexington. building. Some outworks were captured, and the Nationals were driven wievery disadvantage, the latter conducted a most gallant defense. General Rains's division occupied a strong position on the east and northeast of the fortifications, from which an effective cannonade was opened at nine o'clock, and kept up by Bledsoe's Battery, commanded by Captain Emmit McDonald, and another directed by Captain C. Clark, of St. Louis. General Parsons took a position southwest of the works, from which his battery, under Captain Guibor, poured a steady fire upon the garrison
about seven miles north of Franklin, about 10 p. m., on the 16th. Early on the morning of the 17th our cavalry was driven in — in confusion — by the enemy; who at once commenced a most vigorous pursuit, his cavalry charging at every opportunity and in the most daring manner. It was apparent that they were determined to make the retreat a rout, if possible. Their boldness was soon checked by many of them being killed and captured by Pettus's Alabama, and Stovall's Georgia, brigades, with Bledsoe's battery, under Major General Clayton. Several guidons were captured in one of their charges. I was soon compelled to withdraw rapidly towards Franklin, as the enemy was throwing a force in my rear from both the right and left of the pike, on roads coming into the pike near Franklin, and five miles in my rear. This force was checked by Brigadier General Gibson, with his brigade, and a regiment of Buford's cavalry, under Colonel Shacklet. The resistance which the enemy had met with ea
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
as Battalion Infantry. Good's battery. Reves' Missouri Scouts.   Humphreys' battery. Third Division. Brig. Gen. D. H. Maury. First Brigade. Second Brigade. Col. T. P. Dockery. Brig. Gen. J. C. Moore. 18th Arkansas Regiment. Hobbs' Arkansas Regiment Infantry. 19th Arkansas Regiment. Adams' Arkansas Regiment Infantry. 20th Arkansas Regiment. 35th Mississippi Regiment Infantry. McCairns' Arkansas Battalion. 2d Texas Regiment Infantry. Jones' Arkansas Battalion. Bledsoe's battery. ----battery.   Third Brigade. Brig. Gen. C. W. Phifer. 3d Arkansas Cavalry, dismounted. 6th Texas Cavalry, dismounted. 9th Texas Cavalry, dismounted. Brooks' battalion. McNally's battery. Command. present. absent. present and absent. For duty. Sick. Extra duty. In arrest. Effective total. Total. Aggregate. Detached duty. With leave. Without leave. Sick. Total. Aggregate. Officers. Enlisted men. Officers. Enlisted men. Officers. Enlisted me
Aggregate present. Aggregate present and absent. Infantry:    Burbridge's regiment590923  Campbell's battalion400585  Clark's battalion119158  Hughes' battalion148179  McCown's regiment476653  MacFarlane's regiment547822  Priest's regiment368453  Pritchard's regiment450754  Rosser's battalion281350 Cavalry:    Gates' regiment (dismounted)536777  Hill's company5171  McCulloch's regiment (dismounted)444476  Murphy's company100116  Reves' company5272 Artillery, batteries:    Bledsoe's5376  Clark's91104  Gorham's4350  Guibor's6980  Kelly's    Kneisley's    Landis'6269  Lucas'7072  MacDonald's100100  Teel's [Texas]    Wade's107116 Brig. Gen. M. Jeff. Thompson's brigade701910 Grand total4,9587,866 Dabney H. Maury, Assistant Adjutant-General. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, May 5, 1862. Maj. T. A. Washington, Assistant Adjutant-General, Richmond, Va.: Major: I have the honor to communicate, for the info
ion with great coolness and bravery, and were always in front of their men cheering them on. Woodruff and Reid managed their batteries with great ability, and did much execution. For those officers and men who were particularly conspicuous, I will refer the Department to the reports of the different commanders. To my personal staff I am much indebted for the coolness and rapidity with which they carried orders about the field, and would call particular attention to my volunteer aids, Capt. Bledsoe, Messrs. Armstrong, Ben Johnston, (whose horse was killed under him,) Hamilton Pike, and Major King. To Major Montgomery, quartermaster, I am also indebted for much service as an aid during the battle; he was of much use to me. To Col. McIntosh, at one time at the head of his regiment, and at other times in his capacity of adjutant-general, I cannot give too much praise. Wherever the balls flew thickest he was gallantly leading different regiments into action, and his presence gave con
ion with great coolness and bravery, and were always in front of their men cheering them on. Woodruff and Reid managed their batteries with great ability, and did much execution. For those officers and men who were particularly conspicuous, I will refer the Department to the reports of the different commanders. To my personal staff I am much indebted for the coolness and rapidity with which they carried orders about the field, and would call particular attention to my volunteer aids, Capt. Bledsoe, Messrs. Armstrong, Ben Johnston, (whose horse was killed under him,) Hamilton Pike, and Major King. To Major Montgomery, quartermaster, I am also indebted for much service as an aid during the battle; he was of much use to me. To Col. McIntosh, at one time at the head of his regiment, and at other times in his capacity of adjutant-general, I cannot give too much praise. Wherever the balls flew thickest he was gallantly leading different regiments into action, and his presence gave con
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 33. capture of Lexington, Missouri. (search)
eir intrenchments. We then took our position within easy range of the college, which building they had strongly fortified, and opened upon them a brisk fire from Bledsoe's battery, which, in the absence of Capt. Bledsoe, who had been wounded at Big Dry Wood, was gallantly commanded by Capt. Emmitt McDonald, and by Parsons' batteryCapt. Bledsoe, who had been wounded at Big Dry Wood, was gallantly commanded by Capt. Emmitt McDonald, and by Parsons' battery, under the skilful command of Capt. Guibor. Finding after sunset that our ammunition, the most of which had been left behind on the march from Springfield, was nearly exhausted, and that my men, thousands of whom had not eaten a particle in thirty-six hours, required rest and food, I withdrew to the Fair Ground and encamped the.-Gen. Rains' division occupied a strong position on the east and northeast of the fortifications, from which an effective cannonading was kept up on the enemy by Bledsoe's battery, under command, except on the last day, of Capt. Emmitt McDonald, and another battery, commanded by Capt. C. Clark, of St. Louis. Both of these gentlem
ol. Walthall, in advance, and the Tennessee regiments of Colonels Cummings, Battle, and Stanton, with four guns commanded by Capt. Rutledge. Then moved the brigade of Gen. Carroll, consisting of the Tennessee regiments of Colonels Newman, Murray, and Powell, with two guns commanded by Capt. McClung. Then moved the Sixteenth Alabama regiment, Col. Wood, as a reserve, and Branner's and McClellan's battalions of cavalry. In advance of the column moved the independent cavalry companies of Capts. Bledsoe and Saunders. In the gray dawn, about six o'clock, two miles from their camp, the pickets of the enemy fired upon our advanced cavalry and wounded one in the arm. Then two companies of the Mississippi regiment were deployed on the right and left of the road as skirmishers, and advanced parallel with the road. On the left, in an open field, was a house near the road, and near by and behind this house was a skirt of woods. While the skirmishers were advancing towards this, the enem
o further military news. Doc. 109.-battle of McMinnville, Tenn: fought March 26, 1862. A correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette, writing from Nashville, Tenn., under date of April second, says: Feeling greatly alarmed lest an insurrection of the whites should occur in portions of the country around McMinnville, certain conservators of Southern rights despatched messengers, not long since, to Decatur, praying for confederate aid. In answer to their entreaties, Capts. McHenry and Bledsoe were sent up with two companies of Tennessee cavalry, to dragoon the threatening populace into submission. About the time they reached McMinnville, last Wednesday, Capt. Hastings was within four miles of the place, with fifty Ohio cavalry, giving some attention to the railroad between McMinnville and Murfreesboro. Capt. McHenry, who commanded the confederates, will be remembered as Governor Harris's Adjutant, in command at this city last summer and fall. Capt. Hastings, who directed our
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