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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 3 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bledsoe, Albert Taylor, 1809-1877 (search)
Bledsoe, Albert Taylor, 1809-1877 Educator; born in Frankfort, Ky., Nov. 9, 1809; graduated at West Point in 1830, and served in the army about two years. when he resigned; appointed a colonel in the Confederate army in 1861, and soon made Assistant Secretary of War. In 1863 he went to England and did not return until 1866. Among his writings are Is Davis a traitor? liberty and slavery, etc. He died in Alexandria, Va., Dec. 8, 1877.
also Secretary of State and Attorney-General. Hon. George W. Randolph, Virginia, third Secretary of War; at one time in the army with the rank of Brigadier-General. Hon. James A. Seddon, Virginia, fourth Secretary of War; Delegate from Virginia to Provisional Congress. Major-General John C. Breckinridge, Kentucky, fifth Secretary of War; summoned from the field [where he was serving with the rank and command of a Major-General] to discharge the duties of this office. Albert Taylor Bledsoe, Ll. D., Virginia, Assistant Secretary of War. Hon. John A. Campbell, Louisiana, Assistant Secretary of War. General Samuel Cooper, Virginia, Adjutant and Inspector General. Colonel A. C. Myers, first Quartermaster-General. Brigadier-General A. R. Lawton, Georgia, second Quartermaster-General; summoned from the field, where he was serving with the rank and command of Brigadier-General, to discharge the duties of this office. Colonel L. B. Northrup, South Carolina, first Commis
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Brigadier-Generals of the Confederate States Army, alphabetically arranged. (search)
t's corps. 166Granberry, H. B.TexasGen. J. E. JohnstonMarch 5, 1864.Feb. 29, 1864.May 11, 1864.Oct. 13, 1862.Brigade composed of the 7th, 10th, 6th and 15th, 17th and 19th 24th and 25th Texas regiments. 167Grayson, John B.Louisiana Aug. 15, 1861.Aug. 15, 1861.Aug. 15, 1861. Died at Tallahassee, Florida, October 21, 1861. 168Gregg, JohnTexasGen. B. BraggSept. 27, 1862.Aug. 29, 1862.Sept. 27, 1862. Brigade composed of the 7th Texas, the 3d, 10th, 34th, 41st and 50th Tennessee regiments and Bledsoe's Light Battery; brigade at one time composed of the 1st, 4th and 5th Texas and the 3d Arkansas regiments, Longstreet's corps, Army of Northern Virginia. 169Gregg, MaxcyS. CarolinaGen. R. E. LeeDec. 14, 1861.Dec. 14, 1861.Dec. 24, 1861. Killed at Fredericksburg; brigade composed of the 1st, 12th, 13th and 14th South Carolina infantry regiments and Orr's Rifles (1st South Carolina Rifles), A. P. Hill's division, Jackson's corps, Army of Northern Virginia. 170Green, Martin E.MissouriGen. S.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Ceremonies connected with the unveiling of the statue of General Robert E. Lee, at Lee circle, New Orleans, Louisiana, February 22, 1884. (search)
arose, it is doubtful if that theory would ever have attained the acceptation which it received. What is that explanation, so apparent and conclusive, and yet, so far as I am aware, first advanced after the war by that great publicist, Albert Taylor Bledsoe? It is this: The original draft of the Constitution, instead of using in its preamble the words We, the people of the United States, used the words We, the people of the States of Virginia, Massachusetts, etc., specifying each State by nstorical question. I have, of course, barely indicated the faint outlines of the grand argument sustaining the right of secession. Those who desire to go deeper may consult those great storehouses of facts and principles, the works of Calhoun, Bledsoe, Stephens, Sage, and our immortal leader, Jefferson Davis. It is not for me dogmatically to proclaim that we were right and that the supporters of the Union were wrong. I shall have accomplished a duty, and shall, as I believe, have rendered
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The case of the <rs>South</rs> against the <rs>North</rs>. [from New Orleans Picayune, December 30th, 1900.] (search)
al records and other authentic sources of information. If he is anywhere in error, he can be very easily corrected, because he has been extremely careful in the citation of his authorities. Moreover, his book is an answer. Though the South has submitted to the arbitrament of arms, it has yet a right to be heard before the august tribunal of history. It is true that the South has been defended with great ability by jurists and publicists of the learning, forcefulness and acuteness of A. T. Bledsoe and B. J. Sage; but these writers deal almost exclusively with questions of constitutional law. Mr. Grady, while he goes over the ground already traversed by them, is at pains to follow the actual course of Federal legislation, insofar as it appears to have a sectional significance. The general effect of his presentation of the case is to show that from the beginning of the history of the Federal Government, the Southern States have been compelled to occupy a defensive attitude. The Br
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A confederation of Southern Memorial Associations. (search)
04. Attucks, Crispus, 157. Barn-burners, Sheridan's, 98. Bartlett, General William F., 47, 207. Barton Jr., Lieut David R., 69. Beale, General R. L. T., 253. Beauregard, General P. G. T., 287; at Drewry's Bluff and Petersburg, 318. Behan, Mrs. W. J 380. Benton, Thomas A., Views of, 163. Bermuda Hundred, 330. Bernard, George S., 204. Bingen on the Rhine, 350. Birthday of Lee, poem 238. Blackford. Lieutenant L. M., 70. Blakemore, The Bravest, 49 Bledsoe, Albert Taylor, 157. Bouldin, Captain E. E., 71, 77, 250. Bowie, Lieut., Walter, how he died, 135. Boyd, Belle, 296. Boyd, Lieutenant, E. Holmes, 69 Branch, Major, Thomas, 26. Brander, Major T. A, 4. Broadbent, Captain, Wallace, 308. Brockenbrough, Captain, J. Bowyer, 70. Brown's Raid, John, 185, 317. Brown, Governor Joseph E 288 Browne, General William M., 298. Brown, Lieutenant William M., 70. Brunswick Guard, Record and Roll of, 8; Blues, Record of, 261. Bryan, Mrs
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association Listens to a masterly oration by Judge Charles E. Fenner. (search)
at every point and in every step to preserve its character as a purely federal compact between sovereign and and independent States which retained their inherent sovereignty, and all the powers pertaining thereto, except the carefully limited functions which were expressly delegated to the federal government as a common agent. But I must not allow myself to be drawn into further discussion of this great question. Fortunately, Jefferson Davis, aided by the exhaustive researches of Albert Taylor Bledsoe and of our distinguished and venerable fellow-citizen, B. J. Sage, has formulated the whole argument in his Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government. I have recently re-read that matchless argument. It is comprised in the fifteen chapters of part II of that work, and embraces only 112 pages. Speaking with all due temperance and strictly as a legal critic, I pronounce it one of the most powerful and masterly legal and constitutional arguments of which I have any knowledge in t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.48 (search)
The right of secession—a Review of Bledsoe's able work. From the Times-dispatch, October 20-27, 1907. An Epitome of the views of Webster, Calhoun and other famous statesmen. By Frederick Wil a Traitor, or Was Secession a Constitutional Right, Previous to the War of 1861? By Albert Taylor Bledsoe, A. M., L. L. D., late professor of mathematics in the University of Virginia. Republished ent could be formed that should act, not on the States, but directly on individuals. (To him Dr. Bledsoe refers in note on page 52 of the work under review, but inadvertently gives the credit of thend to keep the compact. A bargain broken on one side is broken on all sides (see page 101 of Dr. Bledsoe's work), appears not to have had clearly defined in his mind the idea for which he had in forso made, it was but following the dictates of the highest patriotism and loyalty to truth, as Dr. Bledsoe clearly demonstrates, for all who fought and suffered in the great war of coercion to hazard