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D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for W. A. Blount or search for W. A. Blount in all documents.

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the men who had made up the First North Carolina regiment of volunteers, the oldest regiment in the Confederate service. After its reorganization under the accomplished Leventhorpe, it had been severely tested at Franklin, at White Hall, and at Blount's creek. The Twenty-sixth regiment, commanded by as gallant a soldier as ever wore epaulettes, Harry K. Burgwyn, saw bloody service at New Bern, and took part, an honorable part, in all the battles around Richmond. The Fifty-second regiment, trained and commanded by an educated soldier, the noble J. K. Marshall, was over a year old in its organization and had been tried, and borne itself bravely, in battle on the Blackwater, at Blount's creek and at Goldsboro. The Forty-seventh regiment also had been in service over a year, had for its officers many men originally members of the First regiment, had been under fire for three months in its campaigning in North Carolina, and while it had been in no great pitched battle, it was battle-t
tate by his guardian, Gov. John Branch, and was taken to Washington when the governor was appointed secretary of the navy in 1829. At the national capital the boy studied under various preceptors, one of them being Salmon P. Chase, afterward secretary of the treasury. He was graduated with first honors at Princeton in 1838, after which he resided eight years in Florida, practicing law and in the early part of 1841 participating in the Seminole war. In 1844 he married the daughter of Gen. W. A. Blount, of Washington, N. C., and soon afterward made his home at Raleigh. In 1852 he was an elector on the Pierce ticket; in the same year became president of the Raleigh & Gaston railroad, and in 1855 was elected to Congress, where he served until the war began. Upon the resignation of Howell Cobb he was tendered, but declined, the position of secretary of the treasury. Returning from Congress March 4, 1861, he advocated immediate secession, and in April enlisted as a private in the Rale