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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 34 0 Browse Search
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 20 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 28, 1864., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 18, 1864., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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two guns in all in position, which were served by improvised artillerists. He continues: Remember the situation. It was half-past 4 o'clock-perhaps a quarter later still. Every division of our army on the field had been repulsed. The enemy were in the camps of four out of five of them. We were driven to within little over half a mile of the landing. Behind us was a deep, rapid river. Before us was a victorious enemy. And still there was an hour for fighting. Oh, that night or Blucher would come! Oh, that night or Lew Wallace would come! Nelson's division of General Buell's army evidently couldn't cross in time to do us much good. We didn't yet know why Lew Wallace wasn't on the ground. In the justice of our cause, and in that semicircle of twenty-two guns in position, lay all the hope we could see. He attributes the final repulse to the fire of these batteries, the shelling of the gunboats, and the assistance of Nelson's advance. That these combined means of r
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Meade at Gettysburg. (search)
sufficient refutation of the charge. General Humphreys, one of the ablest officers in our army, in speaking on this subject, says: These instructions stated, Developments may cause the commanding general to assume the offensive from his present positions. Not many hours after, new developments did cause him to change his plans, but these instructions evince that foresight which proves his (Meade's) ability to command an army. In similar circumstances, the agreement between Wellington and Blucher to concentrate their two armies-nearly double the number of Napoleon-far to the rear, in the vicinity of Waterloo, has been esteemed a proof of their great ability. On June 30th, General Meade had sent General Reynolds, who commanded the left wing of our army, to Gettysburg, with orders to report to him concerning the character of the ground there, at the same time ordering General Humphreys to examine the ground in the vicinity of Emmetsburg. But while thus active in his endeavors to a
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The career of General A. P. Hill. (search)
f his dispositions, and the celerity of his attack, his qualities of vigor and boldness, of cool determination, and unflinching obstinacy, never shone brighter than in the Seven Days Fight around Richmond. General Lee had just succeeded Johnston in command of the Confederate army; McClellan was gathering his strength for the long-promised spring upon Richmond; Stuart had swooped, with his bold troopers, from the Chickahominy to the James; Jackson was sweeping down from the Valley to add Blucher's vim to Wellington's attack upon the young Napoleon! It was the eve of the mighty conflict which for seven days surged and thundered around the Southern capital; and to the grand game, in which life, and death, and national existence were to be the stakes, there came, on either side, troops whose mettle was yet to be thoroughly tested, and officers to whom, with few exceptions, belonged, as yet, only the name of generals. In the fearful ordeal how many passed scathless through the storm
o line, and at the word moved gallantly forward. I could not resist the temptation of riding my iron-gray close up to the lines, and crying out, Bully for the Sixth Ohio! The regiment was halted a short distance in the rear of the Thirty-sixth Indiana, the firing having materially slackened; in a few minutes it ceased entirely. Within the next half-hour the deepening darkness, setting at rest the question of further fighting for that day, had decided the issue of the struggle: Night and Blucher had both come. Mr. Davis, in reply to a letter from a friend, says: There was no need to say more than you have said about Shiloh, concerning which, notwithstanding his report, where little was said of Sidney Johnston except the fact that he was killed, Beauregard has but two sustained claims. One to have prepared the order of march, which resulted in failure to bring the troops on the ground at the time and manner required; and the other, to have withdrawn the army at the moment of vi
l not see his men suffer and sit down to dine. Rat-ta-tat, Tra-la-la, fill we out a full can, We'll both drink to the Hero, and drink to the Man, And the General too, who 'mong bold ones will stand, Who dared put into practice what head-work had planned. Listen, comrades, we Yankees are most reading men, And something of history and generals ken. Which commanders are those that a soldier will mention, Who's studied his books with delight and attention? Why, Gustavus, and Fred'rick, Charles, Blucher, and Saxe, And the like, who trod ably in Hannibal's tracks, 'Mong our own, Greene, “Mad Anthony,” Schuyler, and Lamb, And Montgomery, dead near the field of Montcalm-- That field where Wolfe died, all content as victorious-- Leaving names that are watchwords-whole nation's themes glorious. Well! who most in this war showed a spirit like theirs? Grant and Farragut truly have done their full shares; But the two, who at outset, the foremost will show Were Phil Kearny in coffin; alive, “Fight<
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 2: military policy, or the philosophy of war. (search)
essary for directing every thing according to his own will, the best system which he can adopt, will be to imitate precisely what the Prussian government did with Blucher; that is to say, to call to his assistance two generals the most famed for their capacity, the one taken from among men of acknowledged executive qualities, the oe should be given the command with carte-blanche, and with the choice of his instruments. If he have not yet required the same titles, he may be sur rounded like Blucher, with an instructed chief of staff, and with a counselor taken from among men of tried execution. But in no case would it be wise to give those counselors other mo may live in good harmony; the glory is sufficiently great to yield a part of it to a friend who should have concurred in preparing successes. It was thus that Blucher, assisted by the Gneisenaus and Mufflings, covered himself with a glory which probably he never would have acquired all alone. Without doubt, this kind of double
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
Now, in this march of the armies of Schwartzenberg, Blucher, the Prince of Sweden and Benningsen, we find againe not followed; for they prescribed the waiting for Blucher, and the falling upon him when he should furnish ocd would also have been able to accept a battle with Blucher, if he had better comprehended the instructions of ty, the one by Quatre-Bras, and the other by Wavre; Blucher and Wellington, taking an interior strategic line, . The sudden attack of Napoleon on Fleurus decided Blucher to receive battle parallelly to the English base, aat Ligny, and a refugee at Gembloux, then at Wavre, Blucher had but three strategical lines to choose, that whi a strategic line more audacious still than that of Blucher upon Wavre. However, it was a question only of thr the army, by giving to the Prince of Hohenlohe and Blucher time to gain Berlin, or Stettin at least. Those Jena but the same manoeuvre? What was the march of Blucher to Waterloo, but the application of the interior st
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 4: grand tactics, and battles. (search)
hat the more simple a decisive manoeuvre shall be, the more certain will be its success; the second is that the seasonableness of sudden dispositions, taken during the combat, is of more probable success than the effect of manoeuvres combined in advance; unless the latter reposing upon interior strategic movements, have led the columns which are to decide the battle, upon points where their effect will be assured. Warterloo and Bautzen attest this last truth; from the moment when Bulow and Blucher had arrived upon the height of Frischermont, nothing could have prevented the loss of the battle by the French, they could struggle only to render the defeat more or less complete. In the same manner at Bautzen as soon as Ney had arrived at Klix, the retreat of the Allies on the night of the 20th of May, would alone have been able to save them, for on the 21st it was no longer time, and if Ney had better executed what he was advised, the victory would have been immense. With regard to m
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 6: logistics, or the practical art of moving armies. (search)
a small number of officers capable of penetrating them by analogy with precedents. In the same manner, in 1815, when Blucher cantoned peaceably between the Sambre and the Rhine, and Wellington gave or received fetes at Brussels, both awaiting thuard, which had just scarcely been reformed at the capital, burst like lightning upon Charleroi and upon the quarters of Blucher, with columns converging from all points of the horizon, to arrive, with rare punctuality, the 14th June in the plains omself on the belt of strong places of Lorraine and Alsace. This precious information decided the union of the armies of Blucher and Schwartzenburg, which all seeming strategic remonstrance had never succeeded in making act in concert, excepting at ncertain: an aeronaut would have been sufficiently embarrassed to decide at the battle of Waterloo if it were Grouchy or Blucher who arrived by St. Lambert; but in cases where armies are less mingled and more distinct, it seems that this means might
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army., Example of a battle of the offensive defense: battle of Austerlitz, December 2, 1805. (search)
fully the campaign against the allies by falling on Blucher and Wellington, who, with their armies, amounting t of June, found himself and army in the quarters of Blucher, who, however, had managed to assemble the greater ith the main body, 65,000 men, attacked the army of Blucher. Ney, having advanced very late, found the forceay. Ney, at Quatre-Bras, was already in the rear of Blucher; Napoleon ordered him to leave this position, and ted to the next day, the 18th. In the mean while, Blucher retreated in the direction of Wavre, where he arrivm the 80,000 men present at the battle of the 16th, Blucher could assemble on the 17th about 40,000 or 45,000. vre is about five or six miles from Mont St. Jean. Blucher and Wellington concerted the measures to be taken fellington was to keep his position to the last, and Blucher was to arrive and join him in the course of the batrsuers. Only two or three batteries were saved. Blucher's cavalry pursued the enemy during the whole night
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