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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Aaron Blythe or search for Aaron Blythe in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the companies. (search)
. S. Hogan; third, John A. Kelly; fourth, John Flynn, died in Camp Douglas, January 8, 1864, of congestive chills; fifth, Milton Vivion. Corporals—First, J. S. Gamboe; second, Wm. B. Willis; second, J. H. Carter, died February 24, 1863, near Monticello, Ky., of brain fever; third, Benj. H. Jones; fourth, F. M. Cottman. Privates—J. H. Adams, discharged December 1, 1862, disability; J. N. Aldridge, died in Camp Douglas, October 21, 1864, of typhoid fever; Lewis Ballard, George Birch, Aaron Blythe, Henry Charles, R. H. Chisholm, David Clark, D. W. Clark, Wildie Clark, Wm. Clem, William Craig, John Daniel, F. M. Dority, John Dority, Samuel Dority, Wm. Dority, John Dougherty, died in Camp Douglas, October 2, 1864, of pneumonia; Charles B. Ecton, now a member of the Kentucky Senate; Casswell Epperson, John Fields, Wm. French, John Goode, John Gruelle, deserted October, 1862, and joined the Federal Army; Michael Haggard, Robert Hogan, Joe S. Hood, Henry Hugeley, James Hugeley, John Jon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Federal Atrocities in the Civil war. From the New Orleans, La., Picayune, August 10, 1902. (search)
ss., where they found a young lady on the eve of leaving the place with a large Saratoga trunk, well packed with her own wearing apparel. The soldiers took possession of the trunk and arrested a citizen (I have forgotten his name), took also a wagon and team on the place, put the prisoners and trunk in it, and started towards Memphis. About 5 o'clock P. M., one mile from the state line, on the Widow White's plantation, and about 200 yards beyond her house, they were fired into by some of Blythe's Scouts, thought to have been John Mayfield, a Mr. Clinton and Ed Fort. The lieutenant in charge of the company and the citizen prisoner were both killed. The Federals, not knowing how strong their enemy was, fled in confusion, leaving their dead in the road. Mrs. White's family was composed of herself, a daughter about eighteen years of age, and a son, who had married a few days previously a beautiful and wealthy girl. Mr. White was a strong Union man, and refused to go into the Confe