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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 8: winter campaign in the Valley. 1861-62. (search)
for Winchester, by railroad, and reached that place on the same day. On his arrival there, the only forces subject to his orders, in the whole district, were three fragmentary brigades of State militia, under Brigadier-Generals Carson, Weem, and Boggs, and a few companies of irregular cavalry, imperfectly armed, and almost without discipline or experience. The first act of the General was to call out the remaining militia of those brigades from the adjoining counties. The country people respas now restored to all the citizens. All this had been accomplished with a loss of four men killed, and twenty-eight wounded. General Jackson now proceeded to place the command of General Loring in winter quarters, near Romney, and to canton Boggs' brigade of militia along the south branch, from that town to Moorefield, with three companies of cavalry for duty upon the outposts. The remainder of the cavalry and militia returned to Bath, or to the Valley, to guard its frontier; and the Sto
r flag, tents, and camp equipage, formed a part of the spoils. The Varuna, having safely passed the forts, found herself amid a nest of Rebel steamers, Commander Boggs's official report. into which she plunged, firing broadsides at each as she passed it, exploding the boiler of the first, which appeared to be crowded with trhe trees ; her guns all the time at work crippling the Morgan, which was making feeble efforts to get up steam. When the water had risen over his gun-trucks, Commander Boggs turned his attention to getting the wounded and crew out of his vessel. The Oneida, seeing her sinking, had rushed to her assistance; but Boggs waved her on Boggs waved her on to the Morgan, which, already in flames, surrendered; she had lost over 50 of her crew killed and wounded, and was set on fire by her commander, who left his wounded to the flames. Fifteen minutes after she struck, the Varuna was on the bottom, with only her top-gallant forecastle out of water. Her crew gained the shore, losing e
h at Union meeting, N. Y., Doc. 118 Blenker, Louis, Colonel, Doc. 296 Bliss, L. W., acting Governor of Jefferson Territory; his proclamation of May 21, D. 90; Doc. 325 Blockade, the Federal, proclaimed, D. 32, 46, 48, 62, 73, 82; Southern opinion of the, D. 75; debate on the, in the English House of Commons, D. 83 Blunt, Ellen Key, P. 31 Blunt, George W., D. 32 Boernstein, Henry, Col. 2d Regt. Missouri Volunteers, proclamation of, June 17, D. 107; Doc. 411 Boggs, Rev. Mr., of Bedford, N. Y., D. 46 Bonham, M. L., of South Carolina, leaves Congress, D. 5; Doc. 8; brigadier-general, (rebel,) Doc. 139 Bonney, B. W., D. 94 Booneville, Mo., battle of, D. 107; account of the battle at; rebel account of the battle, Doc. 410 Border State convention, at Baltimore, Maryland, P. 4, 8; meet at Frankfort, Ky., D. 91; address of the, to the people of the United States, Doc. 350; address to the people of Kentucky, Doc. 353 Boreman, Arthu
26. the Yankee tars at New-Orleans. Come all ye loyal mariners that battle wind and wave, Who guard the sacred honor of our glorious Stripes and Stars, Give three time three with loud huzzas for the bravest of the brave-- For Porter, Boggs, and Farragut, and our gallant Yankee tars! The forts belched forth their thunder, but we gave them gun for gun, As the morning light was breaking in the eastward, dusk and dim: On that day of fierce endeavor, ere the rising of the sun, The rebel fleet deffire-ships, through plunging shot and shell, We fought their fleets and forts till the gallant work was done; With broadside upon broadside our sailors answered well, Till all their ships lay fired or sunk, and silenced every gun. Long live brave Boggs, our captain, and let it aye be told How he fought the staunch Varuna, and won a high renown; How he sunk six rebel ships, and, with colors still unrolled, At his masthead proudly floating, his conquering ship went down! Then three times three, w
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Traitorous and incendiary Legends. (search)
t to risk the fate of the South upon such an encounter in an open field. an incident of the battle of the forts.--Capt. Boggs, of the Varuna, tells a story of a brave boy who was on board his vessel during the bombardment of the forts on the Mi broadsides of the Varuna's rebel antagonist was poured in. Covered with dirt and begrimed with powder, he was met by Captain Boggs, who asked where he was going in such a hurry? To get a passing-box, sir; the other one was smashed by a ball! And so, throughout the fight, the brave lad held his place and did his duty. When the Varuna went down Captain Boggs missed his boy, and thought he was among the victims of the battle. But a few minutes afterwards he saw the lad gallantly swimming towards the wreck. Clambering on board of Captain Boggs's boat, he threw his hand up to his forehead, giving the usual salute, and uttering only the words, All right, sir! I report myself on board, passed coolly to his station. So young a lad, so
n, N. C., June 2, 1863. Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief United States Army, Washington, D. C: General: Referring to my brief report of May twenty-second, I have the honor to report that, learning from Colonel J. Richter Jones, commanding outposts, that he deemed it possible to capture the enemy's outpost regiments at Gum Swamps, eight miles from Kinston, I ordered Colonel Lee's brigade, consisting of the Fifth, Twenty-fifth, and Forty-sixth Massachusetts regiments, three pieces of Boggs's battery, and a battalion of cavalry, to report to him. Colonel Jones ordered the Fifth, Twenty-fifth, and Forty-sixth, with the artillery and cavalry, under the command of Colonel Pierson, Fifth Massachusetts, to advance up the railroad and Dover road, to attack the enemy's work in front, while the Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania volunteers, and the Twenty-seventh Massachusetts volunteers, under the immediate command of Colonel Jones, took a path through the swamp, to reach the rear of the en
ring the day. Memorandum list of ordnance and ordnance stores captured from the enemy in the campaign from Atlanta to Savannah, ending December twenty-first, 1864: Captured and destroyed by the left wing, at Milledgeville, Georgia. 2300 rifle muskets, calibre, 69; 5000 lances, 1500 cutlasses, 30,000 rounds of small-arm ammunition, 5470 rounds of artillery ammunition, 20,000 pounds of powder. Captured in Fort McAllister, Beautiere, Rose Dew, Bartow, Thunderbolt, Jackson, Lee, Boggs, Brown, Water Battery, opposite Fort Jackson, Lanton Battery, in the lines around the city of Savannah, and in the city of Savannah: Artillery.--167 smooth-bore guns, 35 rifled guns, 7 mortars; total number of guns, 209. Artillery Carriages.--76 barbette, 1 casemate, 6 siege, 41 field; total number of carriages, 124. Artillery Ammunition.--19,843 for smooth-bore guns, 1903 for rifled guns, 17 for mortars; total number of rounds of artillery ammunition, 21,763. Small Arms.--183 va
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore), Captured and destroyed by the left wing, at Milledgeville, Georgia. (search)
Captured and destroyed by the left wing, at Milledgeville, Georgia. 2300 rifle muskets, calibre, 69; 5000 lances, 1500 cutlasses, 30,000 rounds of small-arm ammunition, 5470 rounds of artillery ammunition, 20,000 pounds of powder. Captured in Fort McAllister, Beautiere, Rose Dew, Bartow, Thunderbolt, Jackson, Lee, Boggs, Brown, Water Battery, opposite Fort Jackson, Lanton Battery, in the lines around the city of Savannah, and in the city of Savannah: Artillery.--167 smooth-bore guns, 35 rifled guns, 7 mortars; total number of guns, 209. Artillery Carriages.--76 barbette, 1 casemate, 6 siege, 41 field; total number of carriages, 124. Artillery Ammunition.--19,843 for smooth-bore guns, 1903 for rifled guns, 17 for mortars; total number of rounds of artillery ammunition, 21,763. Small Arms.--183 various kinds. Infantry Ammunition.--8000 musket cartridges, calibre, 59 ; 7500 musket buck and ball cartridges, calibre, 69; 11,000 elongated ball cartridges, calibre, 57;
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
bugle sounds a signal, the guns thunder out a salute, Lee reins up Traveller and bares his good gray head and looks at us, and we give the rebel yell and shout and cry and wave our flags and look at him once more. For a wave of sentiment — something like what came a year later at Appomattox when he rode back from his meeting with Grant — seemed to sweep over the field. All felt the bond which held them together. There was no speaking, but the effect was as of a military sacrament. Dr. Boggs, a S. C. chaplain riding with the staff, said to Col. Venable, Lee's aid, Does not it make the General proud to see how these men love him? Venable answered, Not proud. It awes him. He rode along our lines close enough to look into our faces and then we marched in review and went back to our camps. Army of the Potomac, May 4, 1864 2D corps. Hancock DIVISIONSBRIGADESartillery BarlowMilesSmythFrankBrookeTidball GibbonWebbOwenCarroll10 Batts. BirneyWardHayes60 Guns MottMcAllester
the doctor, I should like to see that boy again. He is the bravest little fellow I ever saw. A gallant boy. Captain Boggs, of the Varuna, tells a story of a brave boy who was on board his vessel during the bombardment of the forts on the M broadsides of the Varuna's rebel antagonist was poured in. Covered with dirt and begrimed with powder, he was met by Captain Boggs, who asked where he was going in such a hurry? To get a passing-box, sir; the other one was smashed by a ball! And so, throughout the fight, the brave lad held his place and did his duty. When the Varuna went down, Captain Boggs missed his boy, and thought he was among the victims of the battle. But a few minutes afterward he saw the lad gallantly swimmingd gallantly swimming toward the wreck. Clambering on board of Captain Boggs' boat, he threw his hand up to his forehead, giving the usual salute, and uttering only the words, All right, sir! I report myself on board, passed coolly to his station.
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