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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for S. D. Bolton or search for S. D. Bolton in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 25: capture of Fort Hindman or Arkansas Post. (search)
tis Burt; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, E. D. Ellsley; Acting-Master, George Hentig; Acting-Ensigns, Benj. Sebastian, James Kearney, Charles Pease and John Swaney; Acting-Master's Mates, S. J. Dewight, Henry Haskins, Thomas Devine and J. C. Petterson; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Thomas Cook, Alex. McGee, Michael Norton, James O'Neil and Andrew Lusk; Acting-Gunner, Gilbert Morton; Acting-Carpenter, J. J. Hays. Steamer Fairplay. Lieutenant-Commander, Le Roy Fitch; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, S. D. Bolton; Acting-Master, Geo. J. Groves; Acting-Ensigns, J. C. Coyle and Thad. Conant; Acting-Master's Mates, W. C. Coulson, John Reville and Isaac Summons; Acting-Engineers, Robert Mahatha, G. S. Collins, Chas. Egster and Wm. Bell; Acting-Carpenter, Thomas Manning. Steamer Taylor. Lieutenant, James M. Prichett; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, G. W. Ballentine; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, C. A. Gardiner; Acting-Master, V. H. Minor; Acting-Ensigns, Eliphalet Loring, C. T. Stanton, J. F. Holmes an
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
be sure to come in contact with some one. The inventor also claims to be able to go to a vessel with one or two and get them in contact so as to explode. This can be done, but so much depends on the nerve and daring of individuals that there is no certainty of it. Judging from the success of blasting rocks by powder, superposed upon the rock with a deep column of water over it, we are of the opinion that the depth of water below a torpedo would not interfere with its success. Lieutenant Bolton, who saw and blasted a great deal in East River, near New York, says: One hundred pounds of powder, fifteen feet from the bottom of a vessel, would break her sides or bottom. We would add that a proposed adaptation of these locks to the explosion of shell or batteries under railroad tracks, for defences of approach to fortified works, and for blowing up bridges, seems to us very simple and effective; also an ingenious plan for affixing torpedoes to spar or bow of an iron-clad. We