Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for L. F. Booth or search for L. F. Booth in all documents.

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oops, comprising one battalion of the Sixth United States heavy artillery, (formerly called the First Alabama artillery,) of colored troops, under command of Major L. F. Booth; one section of the Second United States light artillery, colored, and one battalion of the Thirteenth Tennessee cavalry, white, commanded by Major W. F. Bradford. Major Booth was the ranking officer, and was in command of the post. On Tuesday, the twelfth of April, (the anniversary of the attack on Fort Sumter, in April, 1861,) the pickets of the garrison were driven in just before sunrise, that being the first intimation our forces there had of any intention on the part of the enemy to attack that place. Fighting soon became general, and about nine o'clock Major Booth was killed. Major Bradford succeeded to the command, and withdrew all the forces within the fort. They had previously occupied some intrenchments at some distance from the fort, and further from the river. This Fort was situated on a hig
ivered to Captain Goodwin, I rode up myself to where the notes were received and delivered. The answer was handed me, written in pencil, on a slip of paper without envelope, and was, as well as I remember, in these words: Negotiations will not attain the desired object. As the officers who were in charge of the Federal flag of truce had expressed a doubt as to my presence, and had pronounced the demand a trick, I handed them back a note, saying: I am General Forrest. Go back and say to Major Booth that I demand an answer in plain, unmistakable English: Will he fight or surrender? Returning to my original position, before the expiration of twenty minutes I received a reply, copy of which is marked No. 4. While these negotiations were pending, the steamers from below were rapidly approaching the Fort; the foremost was the Olive Branch, whose position and movements indicated her intention to land. A few shots fired into her caused her to leave the shore and make for the opposite