Browsing named entities in Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Solon Borland or search for Solon Borland in all documents.

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d the boldest expressions of opinion, Union or Confederate, were taken good-humoredly. Freedom of speech provoked no indication of angry repression. When information was brought that there were threats of coercion in Missouri and Kentucky, and of reinforcement of the small garrison of Federals at Fort Smith, there was a general demand that it be occupied by and held for the State also, as was the Little Rock arsenal. The governor consented, and ordered a force of volunteers under Maj. Solon Borland to proceed to Fort Smith, and take possession of the military property at that place, which was done, the only difficulty being in providing transportation for all who volunteered. Col. N. B. Burrow was placed in charge there, with a detachment of sufficient numbers, to hold the place for the State. Soon afterward, the arrival of Mr. Lincoln at the national capital, under sensational circumstances, and his inauguration were announced. Those who may have been ignorant of the essent
by Col. DeRosey Carroll; the First battalion of cavalry, commanded by Lieut.-Col. Solon Borland; the Pulaski artillery, commanded by Captain Woodruff; the Clark counincluded the Arkansas regiments of Cleburne, Hindman, Cross, Lyon, Shaver, and Borland, Shoup's battalion of artillery, Roberts' battery and Phifer's cavalry. Patd an attack on Ironton, but Thompson failed to cooperate. About the 12th, Colonel Borland occupied Fredericktown. He was determined to hold his position in Missoured the transfer of all stores to Pocahontas, and left a force there under Col. Solon Borland, consisting of seven companies of Borland's cavalry, four companies of McBorland's cavalry, four companies of McCarver's infantry regiment, and Captain Roberts' independent company. Maj. D. F. Shall, with 230 men, moved to near Ironton, Mo., to cooperate with M. Jeff Thompsony, of Illinois, from Bird's Point. In apprehension of this, November 5th, Colonel Borland wrote to General Polk that he had but 700 men and half a dozen discarded c
were as follows: In Gen. Samuel Jones' division: First brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. Rust—Eighteenth Arkansas, Col. D. W. Carroll; Twenty-second Arkansas, Col. George King; Colonel Smead's Arkansas regiment; Bat. Jones Arkansas battalion; McCarver's Arkansas battalion. Second brigade, Brig.-Gen. Dabney H. Maury—Twenty-first Arkansas, Col. D. McRae; Adams' Arkansas battalion; and Garland's and Moore's Texas cavalry. Third brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. S. Roane—Third Arkansas cavalry, dismounted, Col. Solon Borland; Brooks' Arkansas battalion: Williamson's Arkansas battalion; Arkansas battery, Capt. J. J. Gaines, and Stone's and Sims' Texas regiments. In Gen. Sterling Price's division: First brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry Little—Sixteenth Arkansas, Colonel Hill, with several Missouri regiments. Second brigade, Col. Louis Hebert—Fourteenth Arkansas, Colonel Mitchell; Seventeenth Arkansas, Col. Frank Rector; with the Third Louisiana, and Greer's and Whitfield's Texans. In Gen. J. P. McCown's d
d Twenty-third. They took part in the battle of Marks' Mills, and were on the field at the battle of Jenkins' Ferry. Borland's battalion was organized for Senator Solon Borland, who was elected major. At first containing five companies and abouSenator Solon Borland, who was elected major. At first containing five companies and about 309 men, other companies were soon added, increasing it to a regiment, which was organized by electing Col. Solon Borland, Lieut.-Col. Ben F. Danley and Maj. D. F. Shall, all residents of Little Rock and vicinity. Colonel Borland had served in thCol. Solon Borland, Lieut.-Col. Ben F. Danley and Maj. D. F. Shall, all residents of Little Rock and vicinity. Colonel Borland had served in the Mexican war, was one of the Mier prisoners, and was advanced in years. When it became apparent that the regiment would be ordered east of the Mississippi river, he ordered a reorganization, and the regiment elected Col. James Gee, of Camden; LieutColonel Borland had served in the Mexican war, was one of the Mier prisoners, and was advanced in years. When it became apparent that the regiment would be ordered east of the Mississippi river, he ordered a reorganization, and the regiment elected Col. James Gee, of Camden; Lieut.-Col. Ben F. Danley, of Little Rock, and Maj. A. W. Hobson, of Camden. Colonel Danley was appointed provost-marshal-general, A. W. Hobson was elected lieutenant-colonel, and William A. Blackwell, of Perryville, major. The regiment was retained at