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Universalist Church. --Mr. Bosserman, the new incumbent of the pulpit at this place of worship, preached the third of his series of discourses, upon the shells of the Old and New Testaments, on Sunday evening. The subject for the next discourse is, the parable of the rich man and Lazarus. The congregation worshipping here is gradually increasing in numbers, and the Society in a flourishing condition. The choir has among its members some of the best voices in the city, as any one will admit who has heard them sing during the past few weeks. The singing at the evening services, on the two last occasions of night services, could not easily be excelled.
General Assembly of Virginia. [extra Session.] Senate. Tuesday, Feb. 19, 1861. Called to order at 12 o'clock. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Bosserman, of the Universalist Church. Bill Reported.--By leave, Mr. Newman reported a bill to incorporate the Jackson County Agricultural Society. Petition.--Mr. Carraway presented the petition of citizens of Princess Anne county, praying a modification of the oyster laws. Bank Bill.--On motion of Mr. Armstrong, the bill for the relief of the Banks of the Commonwealth was taken up. On motion of Mr. Dickinson, of Prince Edward, the bill was laid on the table and made the order of the day for to-morrow, at 11 o'clock. Bills Passed.--The following bills were passed: Senate bill to incorporate the Baltimore and Fredericksburg Steamboat Company; Senate bill to authorize an issue of preferred stock by the Alexandria, Mount Vernon and Accotink Turnpike Company. On motion of Mr. Lynch, the Senate adjourned. House
General Assembly of Virginia.[Extra session.]Senate. Thursday,Feb. 21, 1861. Called to order at the usual hour, Mr. Isbellin the chair, and opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Bosserman, of the Universalist Church. Bills Reported.--The following bills were reported: For the relief of the securities of Joshua H. Staats, dec'd. late Sheriff of Jackson county; for the incorporation of the Kanawha Salt Company; refunding to Frank D. Redd, committee for James D. Shepherd, a sum of money paid into the Treasury on account of two fines imposed by the Circuit Court of Prince Edward upon the said Jas. D. Shepherd; authorizing a loan to the Dismal Swamp Canal Company; authorizing the formation of a battalion by two companies in the towns of Scottsville and Howardsville, in the county of Albemarle. Resolutions of Inquiry.--The following resolutions of inquiry into expediency were adopted: By Mr. Coghill, authorizing the Circuit Courts of the Commonwealth to convert decrees of di
General Assembly of Virginia. [extra session.] Senate. Saturday, Feb. 23, 1861. Called to order at 11 o'clock, Mr. Brannon in the chair. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Bosserman, of the Universalist Church. Bills Reported.--For the relief of Benj. S. Reynolds, of Harrison county; to incorporate the Virginia and Ohio Telegraph Company; organizing a volunteer company of Cavalry in Albemarle county; amending section 6 of chapter 138 of the Code; for the relief of Mrs. Cora Anderson, administratrix of Frederick Anderson, dec'd; providing for the purchase and distribution of books of instruction for the use of the military officers of the State. Resolutions of Inquiry.--The following resolutions of inquiry were adopted and referred; By Mr. Dickenson, of Grayson, of amending the charter of the Black Lick and Plaster Bank Turnpike Company; by Mr. Thomas, of Henry, of refunding to Richard Wells, Sr., of the county of Henry, a certain fine paid by him in satisfaction of a ju
Virginia State Convention.forty-eighth day. Wednesday, April 10, 1861. The Convention was called to order at 10 o'clock. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Bosserman, of the Universalist Church. Mr. Con, of King and Queen, presented the proceedings of a meeting of the citizens of that county, embodying resolutions in favor of secession; which, on his motion, were referred and ordered to be printed. Equality of taxation. The resolutions offered some time ago, by Mr.Willey, of Monongalia, on the subject of taxation, came up in order, and Mr. Willey briefly addressed the Convention, urging their adoption, and opposing the amendments that had been proposed. Mr. Seawell, of Gloucester, advocated the amendment which he had offered, for the raising of a committee to report on the subject at an adjourned session. Mr. Brown, of Preston, was in favor of action with out delay. If it was the design of the Convention to refuse the act of justice demanded by the West, they oug
Virginia State Convention.forty-ninth day. Thursday, April 11, 1861. The Convention was called to order at 10 o'clock. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Bosserman, of the Universalist Church. Mr. Harvie, of Amelia, presented a series of resolutions adopted by the people of Nottoway, in favor of immediate secession. Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. Equality of taxation. Mr. Branch, of Petersburg, who was entitled to the floor, gave way to Mr. Willet, of Monongalia, who desired to make a statement. Mr. Willey said that he had indicated his purpose last evening to vote for his original resolutions in preference to the substitute.--He had, however, since been appealed to by gentlemen for whom he had the highest respect, to accept the substitute as a compromise, and in view of all the circumstances he had concluded that this was now his proper course. He therefore hoped that those who thought with him on the subject would support the substitute, preferring a
Virginia State Convention.Fiftieth day. Friday, April 12, 1861. Friday, April 12, 1861. The Convention was called to order at 10 o'clock. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Bosserman, of the Universalist Church. Mr. Blow presented a memorial from citizens of Norfolk city, requesting him to vote for an Ordinance of Secession. The paper, he said, contained 602 signatures; and he was satisfied, from a careful examination, that they embraced the entire Secession party of Norfolk. The total vote of the city, in the last Presidential election, was 1,655, and in the election for a delegate to this Convention the vote was over 1,300, of which he received 922. He still believed that the majority of the voters approved of the course that he had thus far pursued; but whenever he became convinced that a change had taken place, he should feel it his duty, either to obey their behest or resign his seat. He produced, per centre the proceedings of a large Union meeting, held in the city, indica
Virginia State Convention.fifty-first day. Saturday,April 13, 1861. The Convention was called to order at 10 o'clock, Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Bosserman, of the Universalist Church. The resolution of Mr. Price, of Greenbrier, restricting debate to ten minutes on any one subject, being in order, Mr. Wise moved a call of the roll to ascertain if there was a quorum in attendance. Most of the members answered to their names. Mr. Price briefly advocated his resolution. The President stated that he had received a communication from the Governor of the Common wealth, enclosing a dispatch from Gov. Pickens, of South Carolina, which was read by the Secretary. It announces the commencement of hostilities, and says that no harm had thus far been done to the works of the Confederated army, but great damage had been done to Fort Sumter. Mr. Wise commented briefly upon the intelligence, closing with the expression of a hope that the "terrapin" (meaning the Union men) "
State Convention. Thursday, Nov. 28. The Convention was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Bosserman, of the Universalist Church. Non. A. R. Boteler. The President submitted a letter from the Hon. A. R. Boteler, accepting his aapointment to a seat in the Provisional Congress, (to succeed Hon. James M. Mason,) and expressing thanks for the honor thus conferred. Ordered to be entered on the journal. The extortioners. Mr. Chambliss laid before the Convention a series of resolutions passed by a portion of the people of Sussex and Greensville counties on the 27th of November, denouncing the extortioners and monopolists in bitter terms. The resolutions were referred to the "Committee on Salt." Secret session. The Convention then went into secret session for the purpose of considering the ordinance to reorganize the militia. Personal explanation. After the doors were reopened, Mr. Branch made a personal explanation, feeling aggrieved by the Green
State Convention. Friday, Nov. 29, 1861. The Convention was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Bosserman, of the Universalist Church. Pay of officers. Mr. Blakey submitted the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That the Paymaster General of the Virginia forces report to this Convention whether there are any officers belonging to the Virginia forces connected with the militia or volunteer service, receiving pay without active commands, and if so, the aggregate amount thereof per month. Re-organization of the militia. On motion of Mr. G. W. Randolph, the Convention went into secret session for the purpose of considering the ordinance reorganizing the militia. The ordinance was further amended and passed. after which the Convention adjourned.
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