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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 6: South Boston 1844-1851; aet. 25-32 (search)
ame much attached to each other, and were friends through life. Julia was now to realize fully the great change that had come in her life. She had been the acknowledged queen of her home and circle in New York. Up to this time, she had known Boston as a gay visitor knows it. She came now as the wife of a man who had neither leisure nor inclination for Society ; a man of tenderest heart, but of dominant personality, accustomed to rule, and devoted to causes of which she knew only by hears somebody in print. Try it again, Blue Jacket. The wayward moods shown in these letters sometimes found other expression. In those days her wit was wayward too: its arrows were always winged, and sometimes over-sharp. In later life, when Boston and everything connected with it was unspeakably dear to her, she would not recall the day when, passing on Charles Street the Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, she read the name aloud and exclaimed, Oh! I did not know there was a charitable eye
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Greece and other lands 1867; aet. 48 (search)
y chronicled in the Journal and more fully in From the Oak to the Olive. Solid fact as the performance of the functions remains, for us it assumes a forcible unreality, through the impeding intervention of black dresses and veils, with what should be women under them. But as these creatures push like battering-rams, and caper like hegoats, we shall prefer to adjourn the question of their humanity, and to give it the benefit of a doubt. We must except, however, our countrywomen from dear Boston, who were not seen otherwise than decently and in order. A vivid description follows of the ceremonies of Good Friday and Easter Sunday, ending with the illumination of St. Peter's. A magical and unique spectacle it certainly is, with the well-known change from the paper lanterns to the flaring lampions. Costly is it of human labor, and perilous to human life. And when I remembered that those employed in it receive the sacrament beforehand, in order that imminent death may not find th
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
earnest, oft in jest, we have met and tried our best. Nought I dread an open field, I can conquer, I can yield, self from foes I can defend, but Heav'n preserve us from our friend! “ she and her chief vice were always making merry together; when their flint and steel struck, the flash was laughter. It May have been at the Authors' Club that the two, with Edward Everett Hale and Dr. Holmes, were receiving compliments and tributes one afternoon. at least, she cried, no one can say that Boston drops its H's this was in the winter of 1900. it was the time of the Boer War, and all Christendom was sorrowing over the conflict. On January 3 the Journal says: this morning before rising, I had a sudden thought of the Christ-babe standing between the two armies, Boers and Britons, on Christmas day. I have devoted the morning to an effort to overtake the heavenly vision with but a mediocre result. these lines are published in at Sunset. on the 11th the cap and bells are a