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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
populous country some one hundred and fifty by twenty-five miles in extent, we think it has no parallel among civilized nations in modern times. It was never in General Hunter's power to carry out this order, but his acts of brutality that provoked the burning of Chambersburg exceeded even Grant's barbarous order. When Hunter had returned to the lower Valley from the Kanawha he selected the homes of three prominent citizens of Virginia (Messrs. Edmund I. Lee, and Andrew Hunter, and Colonel A. R. Boteler) and sending an officer and party turned out the lady occupants and burned the houses, refusing them permission to save anything from the flames. It is not claimed that these gentlemen had done anything to put themselves beyond the protection of the ordinary usages of war. Two of them, indeed, were not in the military service of the Confederacy and one of these was a kinsman of General Hunter who had in happier years been his host. This act of Hunter's was not in obedience to Grant
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
populous country some one hundred and fifty by twenty-five miles in extent, we think it has no parallel among civilized nations in modern times. It was never in General Hunter's power to carry out this order, but his acts of brutality that provoked the burning of Chambersburg exceeded even Grant's barbarous order. When Hunter had returned to the lower Valley from the Kanawha he selected the homes of three prominent citizens of Virginia (Messrs. Edmund I. Lee, and Andrew Hunter, and Colonel A. R. Boteler) and sending an officer and party turned out the lady occupants and burned the houses, refusing them permission to save anything from the flames. It is not claimed that these gentlemen had done anything to put themselves beyond the protection of the ordinary usages of war. Two of them, indeed, were not in the military service of the Confederacy and one of these was a kinsman of General Hunter who had in happier years been his host. This act of Hunter's was not in obedience to Grant