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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
e, Col. E. McIver Law : 4th Ala., Lieut.-Col. 0. K. McLemore (w), Capt. L. H. Scruggs; 2d Miss., Col. J. M. Stone; 11th Miss., Col. P. F. Liddell; 6th N. C., Lieut.-Col. I. E. Avery (w), Maj. R. F. Webb. Brigade loss: I, 66; w, 482; m, 5 == 553. Artillery: Va. Battery (Staunton Arty.), Capt. W. L. Balthis (w) ; N. C. Battery (Rowan Arty.), Capt. James Reilly. Artillery loss: w, 16. Jackson's division. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Charles S. Winder: 2d Va., Col. J. W. Allen (k), Lieut.-Col. Lawson Botts; 4th Va., Col. Charles A. Ronald; 5th Va., Col. William S. T. Baylor; 27th Va., Col. A. J. Grigsby (w), Capt. G. C. Smith; 33d Va., Col. John F. Neff; Va. Battery (Alleghany Arty.), Lieut. John C. Carpenter; Va. Battery (Rockbridge Arty.), Capt. William T. Poague. Brigade loss: k, 30; w, 149 == 179. Second Brigade, Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham, Jr., Brig.-Gen. J. R. Jones (w), Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham, Jr.: 21st Va., Maj. John B. Moseley, Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham, Jr., Maj.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Cedar Mountain, Va.: August 9th, 1862. (search)
ded, 1445; captured or missing, 622 = 2381. The number engaged on the Union side is not specifically stated, but it is estimated that Pope's effective force in Banks's and McDowell's commands and the cavalry,, on the field from first to last, aggregated about 17,900. The Confederate Army. Major-General Thomas J. Jackson. first division, Brig.-Gen. Charles S. Winder (k), Brig.-Gen. W. B. Taliaferro. Staff loss: k, 1; w, 1=2. First Brigade, Col. Charles A. Ronald: 2d Va., Lieut.-Col. Lawson Botts; 4th Va., Lieut.-Col. R. D. Gardner; 5th Va., Maj. H. J. Williams; 27th Va., Capt. Charles L. Haynes; 33d Va., Lieut., Col. Edwin G. Lee. Brigade loss: k, 10; w, 48 = 58. Second Brigade, Lieut.-Col. Thomas S. Garnett: 21st Va., Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham (k), Capt. W. A. Witcher; 42d Va., Maj. Henry Lane (m w), Capt. Abner Dobyns; 48th Va., Capt. William Y. C. Hannum; 1st Va. (Irish) Battalion, Maj. John Seddon. Brigade loss: k, 91; w, 210 = 301. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
. Battery (Huger's),-----; Va. Battery (Leake's),-----; La. Battery (Donaldsonville Art'y),-----; Va. Battery (Moorman's)-----; Va. Battery (Loudoun Art'y), Capt. A. L. Rogers; Va. Battery (Fauquier Art'y), Capt. R. M. Stribling. left wing, or Jackson's Corps, Maj.-Gen. Thomas J. Jackson. Staff loss: w, 1. first (Jackson's) division, Brig.-Gen. William B. Taliaferro (w), Brig.-Gen. William E. Starke. First Brigade, Col. W. S. H. Baylor (k), Col. A. J. Grigsby (w): 2d Va., Lieut.-Col. Lawson Botts (m w), Capt. J. W. Rowan, Capt. Rawley T. Colston; 4th Va., Lieut.-Col. R. D. Gardner; 5th Va., Maj. H. J. Williams; 27th Va., Col. A. J. Grigsby; 33d Va., Col. John F. Neff (k). Brigade loss: k, 65; w, 346 = 411. Second Brigade, Maj. John Seddon, Col. Bradley T. Johnson: 21st Va., Capt. William A. Witcher; 42d Va., Capt. John E. Penn; 48th Va., Lieut. Virginius Dabney (w), Capt. W. W. Goldsborough (w); 1st Va. (Irish) Battalion, Maj. John Seddon, Capt. 0. C. Henderson. Brigade los
ion, in the foot, neck, and arm. The first two were very slight, but the last a painful though not dangerous wound. The General continued in command until the close of the action. Gen. Ewell was shot through the knee with a Minie ball. The bones were so badly shattered as, in the opinion of his surgeons, to render amputation necessary. When our informant saw him he was being borne from the field on a litter to a hospital in the direction of Aldie, preparatory to the operation. Major Lawson Botts, of the Twenty-second Virginia, received a dangerous but, it is thought, not a mortal wound, from a Minie ball, which entered his face on the left side and emerged at the back of his head. The ball coursed around the bones without breaking them. Major Terry, of Wytheville, was shot through the arm, Captain Fulton through the neck, and Lieutenant Luke through the shoulder — all severe wounds. Capt. A. V. Scott, of the Twenty-third Virginia regiment, was badly shot in the arm. Colonel
ion, in the foot, neck, and arm. The first two were very slight, but the last a painful though not dangerous wound. The General continued in command until the close of the action. Gen. Ewell was shot through the knee with a Minie ball. The bones were so badly shattered as, in the opinion of his surgeons, to render amputation necessary. When our informant saw him he was being borne from the field on a litter to a hospital in the direction of Aldie, preparatory to the operation. Major Lawson Botts, of the Twenty-second Virginia, received a dangerous but, it is thought, not a mortal wound, from a Minie ball, which entered his face on the left side and emerged at the back of his head. The ball coursed around the bones without breaking them. Major Terry, of Wytheville, was shot through the arm, Captain Fulton through the neck, and Lieutenant Luke through the shoulder — all severe wounds. Capt. A. V. Scott, of the Twenty-third Virginia regiment, was badly shot in the arm. Colonel
rrott guns, a part of the fruits of his victory. Upon Lieutenant-Colonel L. Botts devolved the command of the Second regiment after the faainst the terrific shower of shell and grape. I soon after met Colonel Botts, who informed me that he had lost the balance of the brigade. ger, and finding it impossible to join the rest of the brigade, Colonel Botts and I, on consultation, determined to fall back to the road, whnded. I gathered the scattered men of the brigade, assisted by Colonel Botts, and moved along the road until I received orders to halt and rrge W. Wooding, Captain Danville Artillery. Report of Lieutenant-Colonel Botts. headquarters Second regiment Virginia volunteers, Junder. With this I send you a list of the killed and wounded. Lawson Botts, Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding. Headquarters Second regimeommissioned officers, two; privates, fourteen. Respectfully, Lawson Botts, Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding. Report of Major Lowe.
nd zeal displayed by his officers and men. He particularly mentions Major Williams, Fifth Virginia regiment; Lieutenant-Colonel Lawson Botts, Second Virginia regiment; Lieutenant-Colonel R. D. Gardner, Fourth Virginia regiment; Lieutenant-Colonel Edd Twenty-seventh Virginia, commanded on this occasion as follows: The Fifth by Major Williams, the Second by Lieutenant-Colonel Lawson Botts, the Fourth by Lieutenant-Colonel Robert D. Gardner, the Thirty-third by Lieutenant-Colonel Edward G. Lee, tlly submitted. R. D. Gardner, Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding Fourth Regiment Virginia Volunteers. Report of Lieutenant-Colonel Botts. headquarters Second Virginia regiment, August 13, 1862. Captain: In obedience to order, I have the honours to the enemy's fire, providentially no one was killed, and but seven wounded. See list below. Respectfully, Lawson Botts, Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding. list of wounded. D. Shepherd, company I; R. Nichol, company F; J. A. Risccher,
the hardest fought battles of the war. Colonel Baylor, Fifth Virginia, who commanded it, was worthy his heroic command. No more exalted recognition of his worth and services can be uttered, and no higher tribute can be paid him, than to declare that he was worthy the command of the Stonewall brigade in the action of the twenty-eighth ultimo. Colonel Neff, Thirty-third Virginia, while gallantly leading his regiment into action, was killed; Colonel Grigsby, Twenty-seventh, wounded; Colonel Botts, Second Virginia, mortally wounded; Major Nadenbousch, Second Virginia, Major Terry, Fourth, wounded; and others, whose names and whose gallantry have been, doubtless, reported to the commanding General. The second brigade, Colonel Bradley Johnston, which had been subjected to severe picket duty the night previous, and on the morning of this day, and behaved with gallantry in the skirmishes of the morning, was not brought into action. The third brigade, commanded by Colonel A, G. T
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: sword in hand. (search)
proceeded on. with the few troops we had under arms, on foot to Harper's Ferry, where we arrived about twelve o'clock. I found the citizens in very great excitement. By this time the insurgents occupied all the lower part of the town, had their sentinels posted on all the different streets, and had shot one of our citizens and a negro man who had charge of the depot on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. I here formed two companies of the citizens, and placed them under the command of Captain Lawson Botts and Captain John Avis. Their forces were variously estimated from three hundred to five hundred strong, armed with Sharpe's rifles and revolvers. I detached the Jefferson Guards, under the command of Captain Rowan, and ordered them to cross the Potomac River in boats, about two miles above Harper's Ferry, and march down on the Maryland side, and take possession of the bridge, and permit no one to pass. This order was strictly executed. The command under Captain Botta was ordere
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: the preliminary examination. (search)
lmly delivered in the midst of infuriated enemies, the Court assigned Charles J. Faulkner and Lawson Botts, both Virginians and pro-slavery men, as counsel for the defendants. Mr. Faulkner, after conorily ordered him, and the prisoners consented, he would see that full justice was done them. Mr. Botts accepted. Mr. Harding then asked John Brown if he was willing to accept these gentlemen as y. Mr. Harding. You are to have a fair trial. John Brown. There were certain men-I think Mr. Botts was one of them — who declined acting as counsel, but I am not positive about it; I cannot remnse can be saved. Mr. Harding. The question is, do you desire the aid of Messrs. Faulkner and Botts as your counsel? Please to answer yes or no. John Brown. I cannot regard this as an examinattlemen should act as your counsel? Stevens. I am willing that gentleman shall, (pointing to Mr. Botts.) Mr. Harding. Do you object to Faulkner? Stevens. No; I am willing to take both. Mr. H
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