hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 8 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 2 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Bourbon or search for Bourbon in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 136. siege of Cotton Hill, Va., October 30 to November 7, 1861. (search)
en the rebels, finding it too hot, commenced leaving their hiding places, and it was much sport for our boys to see them running. Whenever they had a clear place to pass, the boys would help them along faster by sending despatches to them. For a long time some of our men were close enough to talk across the river to them, and many amusing remarks were exchanged. When our boys wanted to find out where they were secreted, they would ask them if they did not want salt or a drink of good old Bourbon, &c., &c., which would be responded to by Oh, you d — d Yankees, &c., when the response would be by half-a-dozen bullets whistling among them, which our boys call telegraph despatches. This kind of warfare don't suit our boys. They want them to come out and show themselves, and many a challenge was sent to them to come out and give us a fair fight, and not be so cowardly. Toward evening we noticed their forces retreating back along the top of the mountain. We could plainly see their wag