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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 8 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 2 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Bourbon or search for Bourbon in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Spoliation claims. (search)
safety was Russia. The War of 1812-15 wiped out all American claims for commercial spoliations against England. Those against France, Spain, Holland, Naples, and Denmark remained to be settled. Gallatin, at Paris, and Eustis, at The Hague, were instructed to press the subject. William Pinkney, former ambassador at London, appointed in Bayard's place as minister to Russia, was also commissioned to take Naples in his way, and to ask payment for American vessels and cargoes formerly confiscated by Murat, the Napoleonic sovereign. The restored Bourbon government demurred. The demand, they said, had never been pressed upon Murat himself, and they disclaimed any responsibility for the acts of one whom they regarded as a usurper, by whom they had suffered more than had the Americans. Notwithstanding an American ship-of-war—the Washington, seventy-four guns—and several armed sloops were in the Bay of Naples, Pinkney could not obtain any recognition of the claims, and left for Rus
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Williams, Eleazar -1795 (search)
ut, in 1812, he became confidential agent of the government among the Indians in northern New York. He served in several engagements, and was severely wounded at Plattsburg in 1814. Joining the Protestant Episcopal Church, after the war, he was for a long time a missionary, or lay-reader, among the Oneida Indians, and in 1826 he was ordained missionary presbyter, and labored in northern New York and Wisconsin. There were indications that Mr. Williams was the lost prince of the house of Bourbon, and it was proved, by physiological facts, that he was not possessed of Indian blood. His complexion was dark, but his hair was curly. The claims of Mr. Williams to identity with the dauphin of France were not put forth by himself, but by others. In Putnam's monthly magazine (1853-54), Rev. Mr. Hanson published a series of papers under the title Have we a Bourbon among us? and afterwards published them in book form and entitled the volume The lost Prince. Mr. Hanson fortified the claim