Your search returned 76 results in 44 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
yerson for his familiarity with the country, Mackenzie for his personal devotion to General Johnston, and for the possession of every quality to fit him for such an enterprise. Gift says: Dave Mackenzie was one of the best scouts in America, and one of the coolest and bravest men in the world. As a shot he had few equals, if we except Ridley himself, between whom and Dave existed a friendship only found among men of the frontier. After these arrangements had been made, Ridley and Bowers rode to the village. They could get no answer to repeated calls from any of the mud-huts, and not a soul was visible anywhere. Finally, they captured a Mexican creeping behind a hedge. Ridley says: He was evidently dodging us, and watching our motions. We could get nothing out of him at first, but, when I told him we were scouts from Lord's command, he replied in Spanish, The brush is full of Texans, creeping about like cats in every direction. He also told us that the Texans had ca
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 3: a cavalry officer of the army of the United States. (search)
rmy travel and army life were very great in those days. Officers would scarcely get within their assigned quarters at one post before they would be ordered to another, and as transportation was limited to a few Government wagons, the transfer would always result in loss to the officers. Lieutenant-Colonel Lee gives as a glimpse of this in a letter to Mrs. Lee, dated: Ringgold Barracks, Texas, October 24, 1856. Major Porter had for his counsel two Texan lawyers, a Judge Bigelow and a Colonel Bowers, very shrewd men, accustomed to the tricks and stratagems of special pleadings, which, of no other avail, absorb time and stave off the question. The movement of troops to Florida will not take place, I presume, until the beginning of November. They are packing up and getting ready. The officers are selling their surplus beds and chairs, cows, goats, and chickens. I am sorry to see their little comforts going, for it is difficult on the frontier to collect them again. Mrs. Sibley t
s below, and marched on the town, where they made a junction with those that went up in boats. They burned up some meat, destroyed some salt, and carried off the Rev. Cyrus Walters, of the Episcopal Church, and several others. They attacked Captain Bowers's camp, and routed the small force there; but, Captain Bowers being reenforced with a small body of cavalry, after some sharp fighting, the Yankees retired.--Raleigh Confederate. A detachment of the Seventh Indiana entered the town of BoCaptain Bowers being reenforced with a small body of cavalry, after some sharp fighting, the Yankees retired.--Raleigh Confederate. A detachment of the Seventh Indiana entered the town of Bolivar, Tenn., under the impression that the place was still occupied by the Federal troops. Much to their surprise, they found a regiment and a half of rebels in posession. They were in the town, and demanded what troops they were. The reply was, Mississippi. The Indianans, with the shout, Remember Jeff Davis! made a furious attack upon the astonished and disconcerted rebels, and drove them out of Bolivar in the utmost confusion, killing, wounding, and capturing about thirty. The Union los
nfantry, Pa.M R. V. C., camp Pierpont, Dec. 21, 1861. sir: I herewith transmit you a list of the killed and wounded of my command at the battle of Dranesville yesterday, December 20. The conduct of the troops under my command was all that could be desired, officers and men generally behaving with great coolness and bravery. I would particularly mention as deserving of much praise Lieutenant Bonnawitz, of Company K, and Adjutant McKean, for their gallant and soldierly bearing; also Surgeon Bowers, who was in the first fire of the enemy, and provided efficient means for bringing in the wounded not only of our men, but other regiments, and rendering them timely assistance. Very respectfully, W. M. Penrose, Lieutenant-Colonel. Brigadier-General E. O. C. Ord. Captain Easton's report. camp Pierpont, December 21, 1861. General: I have the honor to report that, in obedience to orders from Brigadier-General McCall, commanding this division, I reported to you on the mornin
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 16 (search)
y were about to present him a sword, inviting me to come and see the ceremony. I went back into what was the dining-room of the house; on the table lay a rose-wood box, containing a sword, sash, spurs, etc., and round about the table were grouped Mrs. Grant, Nelly, and one or two of the boys. I was introduced to a large, corpulent gentleman, as the mayor, and another citizen, who had come down from Galena to make this presentation of a sword to their fellow-townsman. I think that Rawlins, Bowers, Badeau, and one or more of General Grant's personal staff, were present. The mayor rose and in the most dignified way read a finished speech to General Grant, who stood, as usual, very awkwardly; and the mayor closed his speech by handing him the resolutions of the City Council engrossed on parchment, with a broad ribbon and large seal attached. After the mayor had fulfilled his office so well, General Grant said: Mr. Mayor, as I knew that this ceremony was to occur, and as I am not used
ed the main body of the rebels, and the contest became general and bloody. Whilst the Third Virginia, Thirty-second Ohio, and Eighty-second Ohio were advancing on the enemy, a six-pounder of Johnson's Twelfth Ohio battery, under command of Lieut. Bowers, was, with the greatest difficulty, placed in position on the mountain, on the left of the turnpike, and gave efficient support to the attack. During the engagement, I also ordered two twelve-pounders of Johnson's Twelfth Ohio battery to bs. During the early part of the engagement Gen. Milroy was superintending both the battle and planting a section of Capt. Johnston's battery on a hill which partially commanded the position of the enemy. The guns were planted and handled by Lieut. Bowers, and did good execution. Capt. Hyman also got two of his guns in position, but the position of the enemy was such that his shells would pass over their heads. Our troops cannot be too highly praised for their heroic conduct in the battle of
minutes with General Grant--the third scene It is due to the courtesy of General Horace Porter, himself an actor in these three scenes as a member of Grant's staff, that so many participants in the historic episode can here be identified. In the first picture (on the facing page) General Porter himself sits reading a newspaper on Grant's right, and on his left is General Rawlins, his chief of staff, next to Colonel Ely S. Parker. General Grant impassively listens to the report that Colonel Bowers, his adjutant-general, is reading as he stands inside the circle to the right of the picture. In the second picture (immediately above) the General-in-Chief has arisen and walked to the left, where he leans over General Meade's shoulder and consults his map. In front of them a newly arrived officer bends forward, receiving orders or reporting. Colonel Parker has passed his newspaper to another officer. The rest of the group center their looks upon Grant. Soldiers from the Third Divis
minutes with General Grant--the third scene It is due to the courtesy of General Horace Porter, himself an actor in these three scenes as a member of Grant's staff, that so many participants in the historic episode can here be identified. In the first picture (on the facing page) General Porter himself sits reading a newspaper on Grant's right, and on his left is General Rawlins, his chief of staff, next to Colonel Ely S. Parker. General Grant impassively listens to the report that Colonel Bowers, his adjutant-general, is reading as he stands inside the circle to the right of the picture. In the second picture (immediately above) the General-in-Chief has arisen and walked to the left, where he leans over General Meade's shoulder and consults his map. In front of them a newly arrived officer bends forward, receiving orders or reporting. Colonel Parker has passed his newspaper to another officer. The rest of the group center their looks upon Grant. Soldiers from the Third Divis
fice in company with the men in this photograph. He and Samuel H. Beckwith, Grant's cipher operator, were almost inseparable and the wires were kept busy with despatches to and from the President. Beckwith's tent adjoined the larger tent of Colonel Bowers, which Lincoln made his headquarters, and where he received the translations of his numerous cipher despatches he later returned to the army and performed conspicuous service. At the battle of Chattanooga, he installed and operated lines onnied Lincoln from City Point on his visit to Richmond April 4, 1865. In his account of this visit, published in Lincoln in the Telegraph Office, by David Homer Bates, he tells how the President immediately repaired to his accustomed desk in Colonel Bowers' tent, next to the telegraph office, upon his return to City Point. Beckwith found a number of cipher messages for the President awaiting translation, doubtless in regard to Grant's closing in about the exhausted forces of Lee. tain method
Regiment New York Volunteers, or First Scott Life Guard: Col., Alfred W. Taylor; Lieut.-Col., John D. McGregor; Major, Wm. Jameson; Adjt., Wm. Henriques; Quartermaster, James M. Bayles. Company A--Capt., Joseph Henriques; First Lieut., I. Lenoske; Second Lieut., James Walker. Company B--Capt., John S. Downs; First Lieut., Fogarty; Second Lieut., Thornton. Company C--Capt., James Mooney; First Lieut., Henry Rasco; Second Lieut., T. C. Shiblee. Company D--Capt., Cruger; First Lieut., Smith; Second Lieut., Schafer. Company E--Capt., Wm. B. Pariesen; First Lieut., Moulton; Second Lieut., Wynne. Company F--Capt., J. H. H. Camp; First Lieut., McDonald; Second Lieut., Bosworth. Company G--Capt., John B. Brahams; First Lieut., Seaton; Second Lieut., Parker. Company H--Capt., John Quinn; First Lieut., Metcalfe; Second Lieut., Bowers. Company J--Capt., Houstani; First Lieut., Wm. Walsh; Second Lieut., Godfrey. Company K--Capt., Constantine; First Lieut., Rodman; Second Lieut., Hepburn.
1 2 3 4 5