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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 11: the Montgomery Convention.--treason of General Twiggs.--Lincoln and Buchanan at the Capital. (search)
igilance and activity of the patriotic Colonel Nichols, Twiggs's Assistant Adjutant-General, who watched his chief with the keen eye of full suspicion, foiled The Alamo. this is a very old building. It was a church, erected by the Spaniards, and was afterward converted into a fortress. There, during the war for the independence of Texas, many Americans, who had joined the Texans in the struggle, were massacred by the Mexicans. Among those who fell were Colonel David Crockett, and Colonel Bowie, the inventor of the famous Bowie-knife, so much used by desperadoes in the Southwest them. He duplicated the orders, and sent two couriers by different routes. One of them was captured and taken back to San Antonio, and the other reached Waite, with the order, on the 17th of February. Twiggs was cautious and had adroitly avoided committing himself to treason in writing. He always said to the impatient Commissioners :--I will give up every thing. But the time had now arrived when
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 20: commencement of civil War. (search)
eady suggested Mississippi Rifleman. the Mississippi riflemen were renowned as destructive sharp-shooters during the war. In addition to their rifle, they carried a sheath-knife, known as the Bowie-knife, in their belt. This is a formidable weapon in a hand-to-hand fight, when wielded by men expert in its use, as many were in the southwestern States, where it was generally seen in murderous frays in the streets and bar-rooms. Its origin is connected with an incident in the life of Colonel Bowie, who was engaged in the revolt of Texas against Mexico, in 1835 and 1836. his sword-blade was broken in an encounter, when he converted the remainder into a stout sharp-pointed knife, and the weapon became very popular. See note 1, page 266. to General Scott the propriety of sending National troops to occupy that very position before a Confederate soldier had appeared, Parton's Butler in New Orleans, page 105. knowing that Washington City could be more easily defended at that dista
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 14 (search)
es on the 6th of May. Along the Bayou or Lake St. Joseph were many very fine cotton-plantations, and I recall that of a Mr. Bowie, brother-in-law of the Hon. Reverdy Johnson, of Baltimore. The house was very handsome, with a fine, extensive grass-r troops would follow, and he must stand on the porch to tell any officers who came along that the property belonged to Mr. Bowie, who was the brother-in-law of our friend Mr. Reverdy Johnson, of Baltimore, asking them to see that no further harm wathe house, and compelled them to carry it back; and after reaching camp that night, at Hard Times, I sent a wagon back to Bowie's plantation, to bring up to Dr. Hollingsworth's house the two portraits for safe keeping; but before the wagon had reached Bowie's the house was burned, whether by some of our men or by negroes I have never learned. At the river there was a good deal of scrambling to get across, because the means of ferriage were inadequate; but by the aid of the Forest Queen and
34. songs of the rebels. The Marylander at Manassas. A fact. Dusty and weary I laid me down To take my rest on the blood-wet ground. I lay on that field with invaders strewn, On the spot where we lately a path had hewn. My reeking Bowie in its bloody sheath I hid the fold of my coat beneath. My head on my Minie with bayonet fixed; In my thoughts were joy and sorrow mixed. Joy for our glorious victory won, Sorrow for we'd lost full many a one, Who for the South had bravely died, And gallantly stemmed the battle's tide. What recked I, though the dead lay there, The gray-haired sire and son so fair. A wearied soldier, at set of sun I took my rest, my duty done. I cared not whether 'mid the dead, Or living the exile found his bed. I could not sleep, for thick and fast Came o'er me, thoughts of the battle past. I thought how many a weary league We'd hurried on, nor felt fatigue. To save our cause of all bereft If the vile Yankees broke “Our Left!” In thoughts I saw brave Elzey s
ak up the railroad en route and generally to so damage the country as to make it untenable to the enemy. This was a necessary war measure. Sherman, in a home letter written from Grand Gulf, Mississippi, May 6, 1863, stated clearly his views regarding the destruction of property. Speaking of the wanton havoc wrought on a fine plantation in the path of the army, he added: It is done, of course, by the accursed stragglers who won't fight but hang behind and disgrace our cause and country. Dr. Bowie had fled, leaving everything on the approach of our troops. Of course, devastation marked the whole path of the army, and I know all the principal officers detest the infamous practice as much as I do. Of course, I expect and do take corn, bacon, ham, mules, and everything to support an army, and don't object much to the using of fences for firewood, but this universal burning and wanton destruction of private property is not justified in war. first, but Sherman insisted that his plan
ak up the railroad en route and generally to so damage the country as to make it untenable to the enemy. This was a necessary war measure. Sherman, in a home letter written from Grand Gulf, Mississippi, May 6, 1863, stated clearly his views regarding the destruction of property. Speaking of the wanton havoc wrought on a fine plantation in the path of the army, he added: It is done, of course, by the accursed stragglers who won't fight but hang behind and disgrace our cause and country. Dr. Bowie had fled, leaving everything on the approach of our troops. Of course, devastation marked the whole path of the army, and I know all the principal officers detest the infamous practice as much as I do. Of course, I expect and do take corn, bacon, ham, mules, and everything to support an army, and don't object much to the using of fences for firewood, but this universal burning and wanton destruction of private property is not justified in war. first, but Sherman insisted that his plan
forms went together. Soldiers could be found all through the camps busily polishing their muskets and their bayonets with wood ashes well moistened. The bowie knife — considered by the Northern press of 1861 an important weapon An article concerning firearms published in Harper's Weekly of August 2, 1861; states that the bowie knife is usually from ten to fifteen inches in length, with a blade about two inches wide. It is said to owe its invention to an accident which occurred to Colonel Bowie during a battle with the Mexicans; he broke his sword some fifteen inches from the hilt, and afterward used the weapon thus broken as a knife in hand-to-hand fights. This is a most formidable weapon, and is commonly in use in the West and Southwest. As much space is devoted to the description of the bowie knife as is given to siege artillery. An illustration in the same journal for August 31, 1861, shows Mississippians practising with the bowie knife. The Mississippians are engaged i
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New Mexico Volunteers. (search)
ed at Fort Union and Santa Fe, N. M., July 1 to August 13, 1861. Duty at Fort Union till February, 1862. Action at Valverde, N. M., February 21. Pursuit of Confederate forces April 13-22. Duty in Central Northern and Santa Fe Districts till May, 1862. Consolidated with 2nd Infantry, to form 1st New Mexico Cavalry May 31, 1862. Reorganized. Organized October 1, 1863. Attached to Department of New Mexico and on garrison duty by detachments at Forts Union, Selden, Craig, Bowie, Cummings, McRae, Goodwin and other points in that Department during entire term of service. (Co. K at Fort Lyon, Colo., September, 1864, to February, 1865.) Expedition from Fort Craig, N. M., to Fort Goodwin, Ariz., May 16 to August 2, 1864 (Co. I ). Expedition to Pinal Mountains July 18-August 17, 1864 (Detachment Co. I ). Expedition to Pinal Creek August 1-5, 1864. Expedition from Fort Craig to Fort Goodwin, Ariz., October 1-November 27, 1864. Mustered out November 7, 186
eened over toward my antagonist, who made a desperate effort to get his fore paws over the side, at the same time seizing the gunwale with his teeth. Now or never was my time. I drew my revolver, and placed the muzzle between his eyes, but hesitated to fire, for that one report might bring on me a volley from the shore. Meantime the strength of the dog careened the frail craft so much that the water rushed over the side, threatening to swamp her. I changed my tactics, threw my revolver into the bottom of the skiff, and grasping my Bowie, keen as a Malay creese, and glittering as I released it from the sheath, like a moonbeam on the stream. In an instant I had severed the sinewy throat of the hound, cutting through brawn and muscle to the nape of the neck. The tenacious wretch gave a wild, convulsive leap half out of the water, then sank and was gone. Five minutes pulling landed me on the other side of the river, and in an hour after I was among friends within the Northern lines.
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
ow six thousand dollars as it shall from time to time be needed. Voted, to pay each volunteer belonging to the town ten dollars a month while in the military service; also proper aid to his family; and if any volunteer shall be killed in battle or die in the service of disease, his children shall receive proper education, and be put to some honest and honorable calling or pursuit, not as a charity but as a debt due. Voted, that each volunteer be furnished with a uniform, and a revolver and Bowie knife. This vote was subsequently reconsidered as far as it related to revolvers and Bowie knives. Artemas Hale, Joseph A. Hyde, Mitchel Hooper, Lafayette Keith, and Joshua E. Crane were appointed to carry the foregoing votes into effect. Rev. Mr. Douglas was invited to close the meeting with prayer. May 20th, Further provision was made for the comfort of the families of soldiers. The committee appointed to recruit a military company reported that eighty-five native citizens of the tow
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