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alion returned to camp at Chattanooga, and on the twenty-eighth marched with the brigade for Knoxville, reaching its present camp on the seventh instant. No praise is extravagant when applied to the officers and men whose bravery and zeal carried the enemy's works, under such heavy loss, on the twenty-third, and climbed the apparently impregnable heights of Missionary Ridge on the twenty-fifth. I have particularly to thank Major Williston, Forty-first infantry, Ohio volunteers, and Captain Bowman, Ninety-third Ohio volunteer infantry, for efficient and gallant services, and, without exception, the subordinate officers of both regiments for gallantry in action and faithful performance of duty at all times. Corporal G. A. Kramer, company I, Forty-first infantry, Ohio volunteers, deserves especial mention for turning the first gun on the enemy when the Ridge was carried, and for capturing the flag of the Twenty-eighth Alabama regiment. On the twenty-third, Sergeant D. L. Sutphin,
s, which lost thirty-five. There were quite a number of our men captured while straggling, catching chickens, and performing acts not legitimately in the line of their duty. In summing up, General Smith speaks in the highest terms of the conduct of General Grierson. Where danger was most imminent, there was Grierson. The fighting of the whole Second brigade, under Lieutenant-Colonel Hepburn, of the Second Iowa cavalry, was excellent. Theirs, with that of the Fourth regulars, under Captain Bowman, was beyond all praise. The Second brigade is composed of the Second Iowa, the Sixth, Seventh, and Ninth Illinois cavalry. General Smith mentions with gratitude the bravery of the Seventy-second Indiana, (mounted infantry,) Fifth Kentucky cavalry, and Fourth Missouri cavalry, all of which commands behaved themselves nobly on all occasions. Forrest, in this fight, or series of fights, had four brigades of cavalry and mounted infantry, reenforced by Gholson's State troops, six hundred