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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
ed, on the 27th of November, and destroyed the Mississippi Central Railroad bridge and trestle-work over Big Black River, near Canton, 30 miles of the road and 2 locomotives, besides large amounts of stores. The expedition from Baton Rouge was without favorable results. The expedition from the Department of the South, under the immediate command of Brig. Gen. John P. Hatch, consisting of about 5,000 men of all arms, including a brigade from the Navy, proceeded up Broad River and embarked at Boyd's Neck on the 29th of November, from where it moved to strike the railroad at Grahamville. At Honey Hill, about three miles from Grahamville, the enemy was found and attacked in a strongly fortified position, which resulted, after severe fighting, in our repulse, with a loss of 746 in killed, wounded, and missing. During the night General Hatch withdrew. On the 6th of December General Foster obtained a position covering the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, between the Coosawhatchee and Tu
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 18 (search)
rd Roost. This duty was assigned Colonel Champion with his own regiment (the Ninety-sixth Illinois) and Eighty-fourth Indiana, Lieutenant-Colonel Neff. Our men drove the rebels quickly to their main lines, and pushed up to the foot of the perpendicular rocks of the mountain and maintained themselves until night, when all but the pickets were withdrawn. The fire of the enemy was severe, much of it coming almost from overhead. Our loss in this affair was 50 or 60 men killed and wounded. Major Boyd, Eighty-fourth Indiana, a brave and devoted officer, here received a mortal wound. During the 10th we occupied our position, slight skirmishing going on. The enemy varied the performance by throwing shells into the valley we occupied from some howitzers they had dragged to the top of the ridge. On the morning of the 11th we made arrangements to relieve General Davis' division in the occupancy of the hills commanding the entrance to Buzzard Roost Gap. It being reported that the enemy was
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
lop the enemy's position. Under a heavy fire of musketry, shell, and canister this was most ably done, until they approached so near the enemy's batteries that their artillery could not be depressed enough to bear on the skirmishers. The enemy was found in heavy force. By night the skirmishers were retired from the immediate front of the enemy's works, which were of the most formidable character, having accomplished their mission. In this advance I deeply regret to mention the loss of Major Boyd, of the Eighty-fourth Indiana. He was severely wounded and has since died. Brave, quick, energetic, and honorable, he was a most useful and valuable officer. His loss was deeply felt. We remained in front of Rocky Face, engaged in skirmishing every day, until the 12th, when this brigade was moved to the right of the railroad, where it passes through Rocky Face Ridge. Here we intrenched, working night and day, in face of a most energetic and watchful foe, under heavy fire, and firmly m
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 178 (search)
n front of Little Kenesaw Mountain. I immediately commenced strengthening the works, and while so occupied was much annoyed by an enfilade fire from a rebel battery. Early in the forenoon of the next day the enemy's batteries on the mountain and along the line concentrated a terrific fire on the batteries in front of the Third Division, and for an hour the cannonade was very heavy. My bugler, Asa D. Broody, was here severely wounded in the head by a piece of shell, and Privates Gibbens and Boyd slightly hurt by bullets. Our division was relieved on the night of the 25th by the Fifteenth Corps, and on the morning of the 26th General McPherson directed me to open a heavy fire on the batteries in range previous to a charge his corps would make at 8 o'clock. His order was obeyed until the advance of his line made it unsafe to fire. Remained in this position, firing more or less every day, until I was relieved on the night of July 1, by one of General Osterhaus' batteries, when I repor