Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Boyd or search for Boyd in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

, and give McPherson battle, or retreat hastily without offering fight. The loss of Newton's division (chiefly in Harker's brigade) on Rocky Face Ridge, was, up to last evening, one field and one line officer and fifteen men killed, and three line officers and thirty men wounded. Our casualties, I have just learned, include Colonel McIlvaine of the Sixty-fourth Ohio, and Lieutenant Ehler, same regiment, killed; Colonel Buckner, Seventy-ninth Illinois, wounded in the body; the gallant Major Boyd, Eighty-fourth Indiana, shot through both thighs; Captain Chamberlin and Lieutenant Hall, Sixty-fourth Ohio, slightly, and Lieutenant-Colonel Bullett, Third Kentucky, slightly. The Sixty-fourth was in the hottest of the desperate conflict for the possession of Rocky Face Ridge, and, led by the dauntless McIlvaine, it won the encomiums of all who witnessed its daring and intrepidity. Tuesday, May 10. The weather to-day was exceedingly unpropitious for active operations. Heavy showers
robability the enemy, in finding his flanks and rear exposed, will fall back from the gap in front of Dalton, and give McPherson battle, or retreat hastily without offering fight. The loss of Newton's division (chiefly in Harker's brigade) on Rocky Face Ridge, was, up to last evening, one field and one line officer and fifteen men killed, and three line officers and thirty men wounded. Our casualties, I have just learned, include Colonel McIlvaine of the Sixty-fourth Ohio, and Lieutenant Ehler, same regiment, killed; Colonel Buckner, Seventy-ninth Illinois, wounded in the body; the gallant Major Boyd, Eighty-fourth Indiana, shot through both thighs; Captain Chamberlin and Lieutenant Hall, Sixty-fourth Ohio, slightly, and Lieutenant-Colonel Bullett, Third Kentucky, slightly. The Sixty-fourth was in the hottest of the desperate conflict for the possession of Rocky Face Ridge, and, led by the dauntless McIlvaine, it won the encomiums of all who witnessed its daring and intrepidity.
vember, and destroyed the Mississippi Central railroad bridge and trestle-work over Big Black river, near Canton, thirty miles of the road, and two locomotives, besides large amounts of stores. The expedition from Baton Rouge was without favorable results. The expedition from the Department of the South, under the immediate command of Brigadier-General John P Hatch, consisting of about five thousand men of all arms, including a brigade from the navy, proceeded up Broad river and debarked at Boyd's Neck, on the twenty-ninth of November, from where it moved to strike the railroad at Grahamsville. At Honey Hill, about three miles from Grahamsville, the enemy was found and attacked, in a strongly-fortified position, which resulted, after severe fighting in our repulse, with a lose of seven hundred and forty-six in killed, wounded and missing. During the night General Hatch withdrew. On the sixth of December General Foster obtained a position covering the Charleston and Savannah railro
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 93. the burning of Chambersburg. (search)
mbaugh's statement was correct, ordered his prompt release, and withdrew the entire rebel force from that part of Second street, and no buildings were burned. Colonel Boyd's residence--Federal Hill, --was also put under guard, when Mrs. Boyd informed them who lived there. They had some recollections of Colonel Boyd occasionally Mrs. Boyd informed them who lived there. They had some recollections of Colonel Boyd occasionally penetrating the Shenandoah Valley, and it was not deemed wholesome to burn his property. Mr. John Treher, of Loudon, was robbed by the rebels of two hundred dollars in gold and silver, and one hundred dollars in currency. The money was in a bureau drawer, but it was most dexterously appropriated by the scienced light-fingered genColonel Boyd occasionally penetrating the Shenandoah Valley, and it was not deemed wholesome to burn his property. Mr. John Treher, of Loudon, was robbed by the rebels of two hundred dollars in gold and silver, and one hundred dollars in currency. The money was in a bureau drawer, but it was most dexterously appropriated by the scienced light-fingered gentry of McCausland. They also stole all his liquors. Mr. D. R. Knight, an artist, started out to the residence of Mr. McClure when he saw Norland on fire, and on his way he was robbed of all his money by a squad of rebels. He reached the house in time to aid in getting the women away. Rebel officers had begged of him before he
y the enemy. We captured and brought off about a hundred prisoners, who represent their loss quite heavy. During the action, Lieutenant-General Ewell's horse was shot under him. The General received a severe fall, which jarred him considerably. He is to-day, however, again in the saddle. The object of this move is said to have been a reconnoissance in force, to determine the enemy's position. We certainly accomplished very little, while we lost some good men, among them the gallant Colonel Boyd, of Daniels' North Carolina brigade, who was killed. The conduct of most of the troops is highly commended, especially Pegram's Virginia brigade, of whom General Ewell spoke in regard to their bearing on this occasion in terms of most exalted praise. Jones' Virginia and the Stonewall brigade, in Johnson's division, or rather the remnants thereof, are said not to have done so well. To-day I have ridden around the lines, and there is a quiet most profound. The pickets have ceased firi