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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
f Northern Virginia. From General R. L. T. Beale, of Virginia--A narrative of the part borne by the Ninth Virginia cavalry, in resisting the Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid, together with a statement which establishes fully the authenticity of the infamous Dahlgren papers. From General Dabney H. Maury, of Virginia--His recollections of the Elkhorn campaign. From W. Baird, Esq., of Essex county, Virginia--A Review of the first volume of the Count of Paris' History of the Civil War in America. From Carlton McCarthy, Esq., of Richmond--Two papers on Detailed Minutiae of Soldier Life. From Geo. T. Whitington, Alexandria--First morning report of troops at Manassas Junction, under command of Major Cornelius Boyle, May 6th, 1861. From Judge B. R. Wellford--Supplemental report of Confederate States Secretary of War (March 17th, 1862), embracing the correspondence in reference to the first cartel for the exchange of prisoners. Other acknowledgmentts and book notices crowded out.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A foreign view of the civil War in America. (search)
ich is being widely circulated, and which some of our Southern papers even have warmly commended without reading]. History of the civil War in America. By the Comte de Paris. Translated, with the approval of the Author, by Louis F. Tasistro. Edited by Henry Coppee, Ll. D. Volume I. Philadelphia: Joseph H. Coates & Co. 1875. It would be absurdly extravagant praise to say of this bulky volume, what was said with such pointed severity of the reply to Bentley, published under the name of Boyle, in the once famous controversy concerning the letters of Phalaris, that it was the best book ever written by any man upon the wrong side of a question of which he was profoundly ignorant. It would, indeed, be much nearer the truth, strong as such language certainly is, to pronounce it the worst book ever written under such circumstances. It would seem well nigh impossible for the mingled force of prejudice and ignorance to go farther, great as their powers confessedly are. Such sentence
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
nday, February 15, 1869. United States Vs. Upon Indictment for Treason. Thomas P. Turner, William Smith, Wade Hampton, Benjamin Huger, Henry A. Wise, Samuel Cooper, G. W. C. Lee, W. H. F. Lee, Charles Mallory, William Mahone, O. F. Baxter, Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, William E. Taylor, Fitzhugh Lee, George W. Alexander, Robert H. Booker, John DeBree, M. D. Corse, Eppa Hunton, Roger A. Pryor, D. B. Bridgeford, Jubal A. Early, R. S. Ewell, William S. Winder, George Booker, Cornelius Boyle, William H. Payne, R. S. Andrews, C. J. Faulkner, and R. H. Dulaney, W. N. McVeigh, H. B. Taylor, James A. Seddon, W. B. Richards, Jr., J. C. Breckinridge, and Jefferson Davis. ´╝łtwo cases.) The District Attorney, by leave of the court, saith that he will not prosecute further on behalf of the United States, against the above-named parties upon separate indictments for treason. It is, therefore, ordered by the court that the prosecutions aforesaid be dismissed. Strange to say,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
nday, February 15, 1869. United States Vs. Upon Indictment for Treason. Thomas P. Turner, William Smith, Wade Hampton, Benjamin Huger, Henry A. Wise, Samuel Cooper, G. W. C. Lee, W. H. F. Lee, Charles Mallory, William Mahone, O. F. Baxter, Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, William E. Taylor, Fitzhugh Lee, George W. Alexander, Robert H. Booker, John DeBree, M. D. Corse, Eppa Hunton, Roger A. Pryor, D. B. Bridgeford, Jubal A. Early, R. S. Ewell, William S. Winder, George Booker, Cornelius Boyle, William H. Payne, R. S. Andrews, C. J. Faulkner, and R. H. Dulaney, W. N. McVeigh, H. B. Taylor, James A. Seddon, W. B. Richards, Jr., J. C. Breckinridge, and Jefferson Davis. ´╝łtwo cases.) The District Attorney, by leave of the court, saith that he will not prosecute further on behalf of the United States, against the above-named parties upon separate indictments for treason. It is, therefore, ordered by the court that the prosecutions aforesaid be dismissed. Strange to say,
Destructive fire. --A fire occurred at Lexington, Mo., a few nights ago, by which ten or twelve buildings were destroyed, several of them stores. Among the latter, the stores of Boyle, Newman & Co., James S. Lightner, James R. Baker, and John F. Pigott. The fire originated in the banking-house of Robt. Aull & Co.
r. It is very necessary that better arrangements for receiving freight be made, and a more vigilant police system adopted. Soldiers cannot afford to loose the necessaries which their friends at home have so carefully provided and forwarded to them. Back of the hotel building is a small grove, which is generally filled either with tents or transport wagons. At the eastern end of this is the Medical Purveyor's office, while still further on is a small white cottage, occupied by Major Cornelius Boyle, the Provost Marshal of the post. Some distance away, but still within sight, are many farm houses, which, with their out-buildings and barns, form an interesting feature in the scenery. Although the place is generally called Manassas, the correct name is Tudor Hall. This is Manassas Gap, but there is another village of the same name at the other end of the railroad, and it was found that there was often difficulty having mail matter delivered correctly. Consequently, the cit
The Daily Dispatch: October 25, 1861., [Electronic resource], Wealth, pauperism, and crime in the North (search)
disclosed the fact that Beauregard has again broken up the roads between those points, as before McDowell's advance to Bull Run. He has also obstructed them in the direction of Leesburg. All these obstructions are, however, unimportant. Dr. Boyle. Our former fellow-citizen, Dr. Cornelius Boyle, remains (or did remain up to the 1st) Provost Marshal at Manassas Junction, with the rank of Major in the army of the State of Virginia. Col. Kerrigan. This New York city officer, whDr. Cornelius Boyle, remains (or did remain up to the 1st) Provost Marshal at Manassas Junction, with the rank of Major in the army of the State of Virginia. Col. Kerrigan. This New York city officer, who has been under arrest for some time past, was to day brought over the river, under a guard, to be placed in charge of Provost Marshal Brig. Gen. Porter. He is charged last with generating insubordination. The situation down the river. Three tugs and one steamer went down from the Navy-Yard last night. Two of the tugs passed the batteries without being fired on. The steamboat would not make the attempt, and the other tug ran into a propeller coming up, and disabled her. The tugs tha
and was very well known in this vicinity. This lamentable affair is the first that has occurred in our army from the use of liquor, although we see by the papers they are common in Washington and in the Federal army. For many weeks Major Cornelius Boyle, the Provost Marshal, has done all in his power to prevent the sale of liquor to soldiers, but still they manage to purchase it in some manner from the citizens residing near, who smuggle it into them, in various ways. Several men have been tried before Major Boyle, have endured the penalty of their offence and immediately after their release have been detected in a repetition of it. In this case both the murderer and the man who furnished him the liquor upon which he got into a drunken frenzy have been arrested. Which of the two deserves the greater punishment?. Yesterday evening Mr. C. B. A. Weedon, a member of the Prince William Cavalry, was returning to his company from a visit to his mother and sisters, when his hor
Confiscations in Washington. --In addition to those already mentioned in this paper are the following cases of confiscation of property in Washington city: The Marshal of the District of Columbia has seized the real and personal estate of the following-named individuals: C. W. C. Dunnington, Dr. Cornelius Boyle, Dr. Garnett, (son-in-law of Governor Wise) Edward A. Pollard, Major' C. S. Wallach, Lawyer Ratcliffe, Francis Hanno, Commodore Forrest, William Shields, Edward M. Clark, Martin L. Smith, Samuel Lee, and several others. Gen. Carrington, United States Attorney for the District of Columbia, is rapidly maturing legal proceedings against the property of all persons who have left their homes and joined the so-called Southern Confederacy. The Marshal of the District seized the following property of persons in rebel service, under the provisions of the Confiscation act. The whole square, five hundred and ninety, with the exception of lot No. 5, situated between Delaw
Provost-Marshalship. To the Editor of the Dispatch: From a letter of your correspondent "X," if the 28th ult, in which the Provost Marshal General of General Lee's army is named, it would be inferred that Major Cornelius Boyle had withdrawn or been removed from that position. The inference is incorrect. Major Boyle has held the post of Provost Marshal General of the Army of Northern Virginia ever since General Joseph E. Johnston took command of it, and held that place on his staff.rshal General of General Lee's army is named, it would be inferred that Major Cornelius Boyle had withdrawn or been removed from that position. The inference is incorrect. Major Boyle has held the post of Provost Marshal General of the Army of Northern Virginia ever since General Joseph E. Johnston took command of it, and held that place on his staff. He is now so recognized and officially designated by General Robert E. Lee, the present Commander in Chief W. Richmond, April 12, 1864.