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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 2 Browse Search
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. Koltoff, head; P. Cramig, thigh; J. R. Lamb, leg, slightly; E. Myers, shoulder; T. S. Rice, arm and leg; T. Wright, hip, slightly. Company F--Lieut. James Kinkead, hand; Sergeant Jesse McLean, arm, (severe;) Sergeant James Carr, do.; Corporal Michael Boyle, leg; Corporal John Springmeyer, neck; Corporal John Coleman, leg; Corporal James Reynolds, hand; Corporal H. Brokamp, arm; privates, Reuben Daily, face; Charles Hinch, leg; Isaac Baum, wounded and missing; Charles Viner, hand; Richard Hesurrender of Munfordville, Ky. Report of Colonel Wilder. Cave City, Ky., Sept. 18, 1862. To J. E. Stacey, A. A.G. and Chief of Staff: sir: I have the honor to report that on September eighth, 1862, according to a special order from General Boyle, I assumed command of the forces at Munfordville, Kentucky. I immediately set to work building fortifications for defence of the railroad bridge over Green River. On Sunday, September ninth, I was informed that the railroad bridge at Salt R
Stoll, in leg. Company E--Corp. Geo. W. Gentle, wounded in head; Corporal W. Williams, in face; John Garner, A. Carnahan, killed; George A. Peet, dangerously wounded and missing; P. Brady, wounded in foot; Wm. Fischer, leg; H. S. Henneman, foot; J. Koltoff, head; P. Cramig, thigh; J. R. Lamb, leg, slightly; E. Myers, shoulder; T. S. Rice, arm and leg; T. Wright, hip, slightly. Company F--Lieut. James Kinkead, hand; Sergeant Jesse McLean, arm, (severe;) Sergeant James Carr, do.; Corporal Michael Boyle, leg; Corporal John Springmeyer, neck; Corporal John Coleman, leg; Corporal James Reynolds, hand; Corporal H. Brokamp, arm; privates, Reuben Daily, face; Charles Hinch, leg; Isaac Baum, wounded and missing; Charles Viner, hand; Richard Henniger, killed; privates, W. Drexillieus, killed; Henry Huier, killed; John Slossner, wounded in leg, (severe;) John McQuirk, do. Company G--Wounded: Lieut. C. F. McKenzie, arm; Sergeant Wilson Gregg, since died; Corporal C. B. Spennett, in leg; T
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. Report of Colonel Wilder. Cave City, Ky., Sept. 18, 1862. To J. E. Stacey, A. A.G. and Chief of Staff: sir: I have the honor to report that on September eighth, 1862, according to a special order from General Boyle, I assumed command of the forces at Munfordville, Kentucky. I immediately set to work building fortifications for defence of the railroad bridge over Green River. On Sunday, September ninth, I was informed that the railroad bridge at Salt River was burned by the rebels. Our supplies being sufficient for one day only, I immediately began collecting flour and bacon in the country about us, and got some bread from Bowling Green, and managed to get rations for fifteen days. At the same time I ordered all the home guard companies and recruits for the Thirty-third Kentucky, who had no arms, to scatter out over the country, and act in the capacity of scouts. They served me admirably in this respect, giving notice of Bragg's
37. the Major-General Commanding has to announce other instances of disgraceful neglect, and contrast them with another of gallantry. The guard at Courtland Bridge, consisting of companies A and H, Tenth Kentucky, under the command of Capt. Davidson, and a part of Capt. Eggleston's company, First Ohio cavalry, was completely surprised and captured, with but trifling loss, on the morning of the twenty-fifth ult., by a force of irregular cavalry. On the same day, the companies of Captains Boyle and Goben, Tenth Indiana, which were ordered to protect two bridges on the same road, respectively six and twelve miles east of Courtland, deemed it wiser to bring in an empty train which came up, than to defend their posts, threatened with an attack from the same irregular cavalry, and so put themselves on the train and arrived at Decatur, a few miles distant, without the loss or injury of a man. On the same day and on the same road, eight miles from Decatur, a guard consisting of t