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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 40 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 29 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for George Bradburn or search for George Bradburn in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
lver's letters to the London Committee-he being present. Bradburn was down upon him in his usual tomahawk and Geo. BradburGeo. Bradburn. scalping-knife style. Colver then made a most demoniacal speech, saying but little on the subject-matter, but wandering od have thrown him out of the window on less provocation. Bradburn and Garrison replied briefly, and the matter ended by theto him, as he could talk only [to] two beside ourselves. Bradburn and W. L. G. brightened each other by their retorts. Sait is left of the social delights of companionship between Bradburn (a sort of Geo. Bradburn. island host), Quincy, GarrisonGeo. Bradburn. island host), Quincy, Garrison, and Collins; but the significant incident of the public proceedings has been recorded by the chief actor in them. This wastion are alike beneath my feet now (Lib. 11: 199). George Bradburn wrote to Francis Jackson on June 1, Ms. 1841: William95. by this person or that. I see by the Post, writes George Bradburn to Francis Boston Post. Jackson, on August 7, 1841, t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
athew's close by. Great Ante, 2.380. hopes were entertained of its effect on the Irish-American citizen and voter. George Bradburn wrote from Lowell to Francis Jackson: What is to be done with that mammoth Address from Ms. Jan. 15, 1842. Irelasis, we may be sure. Colonel MillerJ. P. Miller: ante, 2.370. spoke to it, alleging Irish blood in his Vermont veins. Bradburn, confessing himself the son of an Irishman, moved a resolution of sympathy with Ireland, then in the throes of the Repeacling to the civil-service reformers. At a second, widely advertised exhibition of the Address in Boston in April, with Bradburn trying the experiment and Phillips assisting, hardly any Irish were visible even to the Lib. 12.59. eye of faith. The ng States require that their connexion be immediately dissolved with the slave States in form, as it is now in fact. Bradburn was the chief opponent of Mr. Garrison, who Lib. 12.86, 87. was again satisfied to have the question freely considered
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
triumphantly adopted. The general tenor of it was, that the Lib. 14: 1. proposed policy, besides being narrow and proscriptive, would make no government men of the abolitionists as a body, and would, in all consistency, preclude them from any use of the existing State and Federal machinery against slavery, as by petitions and the like. Practically, disunion would end either in forcible emancipation initiated by the free States, or in a servile insurrection having their countenance. George Bradburn, with some qualification, but also with a peculiar bitterness to be more fully Lib. 14: 130, 138, 142, 174, 185, 186, 195. revealed ere long, assented to these objections—his first step towards joining the Liberty Party outright. Among the nays we remark further Maria, the sister of William Lib. 14.95. A. White, and her affianced, James Russell Lowell, though the latter had been moved at the Convention to compose verses of a stiffer tone on the main question, as thus: Whate'er we de
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
nown, it naturally brings in many persons, both from the city and neighboring villages, to make inquiries after my health. Benjamin and J. Elizabeth Jones of Salem have been to see me; so has a sister of S. S. Foster, who is residing here. George Bradburn is a daily visitor at my bedside. Everybody is kindly offering me all needed assistance. Fortunately, I am in one of the best families in the world, That of Thomas and Marian Jones, parents of the future Senator Jones of Nevada (Lib. 17falo. It was, however, a strong Gerrit Smith delegation which Lib. 17.178. H. C. Wright accompanied on the boat from Cleveland. For six hours during the passage the saloon was crowded with a caucus over which Owen Lovejoy presided, with George Bradburn and Asa Mahan among the disputants as to men and measures. What was left undiscussed overnight was taken up the next morning. The drift was for a diversity of planks in the party platform, and, by general consent, land reform should be one
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 9: Father Mathew.—1849. (search)
owditch—from this F. Jackson. act. We don't believe he cares the value of a copper cent H. I. Bowditch. for the cause of Freedom or Temperance, except so far as it will build up his own fame. More curiously (if not more lamentably) still, George Bradburn, in his Pioneer, Lib. 19.133. could conceive of many reasons, any one of which would have justified, not only, but demanded Father Mathew's declining to show himself among the Disunionists at Worcester. Yet Bradburn had done what he could Bradburn had done what he could to Ante, pp. 43-45. utilize the Irish Address, saying, when it was unrolled, on January 28, 1842, in Faneuil Hall, that he wished Father Lib. 19.133. Mathew or Daniel O'Connell were there to give fit utterance to the fact that Slavery strikes at the interest of every laboring man; and recalling, for the benefit of his Irish auditors, O'Connells scornful refusal to visit a slavepolluted America or to shake hands with American slaveholders, and entreaty of the Irish in this country to join the a
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
andard and other papers. 3. The Ohio friends are stronger and stronger for Cleveland, as time advances; especially Robinson and Brooke. Samuel Brooke. 4. Bradburn, who at first dissuaded us from Cleveland, now advises it; In 1851, George Bradburn, who, after giving up the Lynn Pioneer, had been associated with Elizur WrGeorge Bradburn, who, after giving up the Lynn Pioneer, had been associated with Elizur Wright on the Boston Chronotype, removed to Cleveland, Ohio, and became one of the editors of the True Democrat (afterwards the Leader). He had greatly impaired his health by taking the stump for Fremont (Life of Bradburn, pp. 229, 233). and Mr. Tilden, M. C., Daniel R. Tilden, a native of Connecticut, Representative in Congress oBradburn, pp. 229, 233). and Mr. Tilden, M. C., Daniel R. Tilden, a native of Connecticut, Representative in Congress of Ohio, 1843-47. See in Sanborn's Life of John Brown, p. 609, Brown's letter to Tilden written in Charlestown jail Nov. 28, 1859. On Dec. 2, 1859, he participated in the mass-meeting held at Cleveland in commemoration of the execution of Brown (Lib. 29: 211). has written a letter which I consider rather favorable than otherwise