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the section in which he had given his dwelling-house to the town! The system of exchanges, by which neighboring ministers preached in each other's pulpits, was in full activity during Mr. Turell's ministry; and the Medford church was instructed occasionally by Rev. Messrs. Colman, Cooper, Gardner, and Byles, of Boston; Prince, Warren, and Clapp, of Cambridge; Stimson, of Charlestown; Coolidge, of Watertown; Flagg, of Woburn; Lowell and Tufts, of Newbury; Parkman, of Westbury; Parsons, of Bradford; and many more. This wide connection in ministerial brotherhood shows Mr. Turell to have enjoyed the respect and esteem of the clergy, as well as the approbation and confidence of the churches. President Allen, in his Biographical Dictionary, speaks of him thus:-- He was an eminent preacher, of a ready invention, a correct judgment, and fervent devotion, who delivered divine truth with animation, and maintained discipline in his church with boldness tempered by prudence. An anecdot
Watertown; two on leaving the Old Meeting-house, and one at the Dedication of the New1836 The Life of John Eliot, the Apostle to the Indians,--vol. v. in Sparks's American Biography1836 The death of the aged 1841 The Life of Sebastian Rasle, Missionary to the Indians,--vol. VII., new series, of Sparks's American Biography1845 In the Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society are the following papers:-- Memoir of Rev. John Allyn, D. D., of Duxbury1836 Memoir of Dr. Gamaliel Bradford1846 Memoir of Hon. Judge Davis1849 The following articles in the Christian disciple, new series:-- On the Use of the Word Mystery, vol. II.; Remarks on Matt. XXVIII. 19, vol. III.; The Gospel a New Creation, vol. IV.; Obituary Notice of Rev. Dr. Osgood, vol. IV. The following articles in the Christian Examiner: -- Reason and Faith, vol. III.; Article on Dr. Robert South's Discourses, vol IV.; Article on Dr. Paley's Life and Writings, vol. v.; Article on Dr. Youn
Zechariah, was the son of Rev. William Symmes, and was b. in Canterbury, Eng., Apr. 5, 1599. He came to New England, Sept. 18, 1634; and soon after was ordained minister at Charlestown. He had eleven children, five of whom were born in Charlestown. He is said to have left his large property to his son William, on condition that he should pay two hundred pounds apiece to the other heirs. This son failing to do this, and dying soon after his father, the heirs appointed Rev. Zechariah, of Bradford, to divide it. He d. Feb. 4, 1671; and had, by wife Sarah,--  1-2William, bap. Jan. 10, 1627.  3 Mary, bap. Apr. 16, 1628; m.1st, T. Savage, Sept. 15, 1652. 2d, Anthony Stoddard.  4Elizabeth, bap. Jan. 1, 1630; m. Hezekiah Usher, 1654.  5Huldah, bap. Mar. 18, 1631; m. William Davis.  6Hannah, bap. Aug. 22, 1632; d. unm.  7Rebecca, bap. Feb. 12, 1634; m. Humphrey Booth.  8Ruth, bap. Oct. 18, 1635; m. Ed. Willis, June 15, 1668.  9Zechariah, b. Jan. 9, 1638; d. Mar. 22, 1708; min
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Francis, Convers 1785-1863 (search)
Francis, Convers 1785-1863 Clergyman; born in West Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 9, 1785; graduated at Harvard in 1815; became pastor of the Unitarian Church in Watertown, Mass., in 1819. Among his writings are Historical sketch of Watertown; Life of John Eliotin Sparks'sAmerican biographies; Memoirs of Rev. John Allyn, Dr. Gamaliel Bradford, Judge Davis, and Sebastian Rale, etc. He died in Cambridge, Mass., April 7, 1863.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Free trade. (search)
ehensive disquisitions are before the world, and are known to command, in a very high degree, the public confidence. He supplies us with tables which compare the wages of 1833 with those of 1883 in such a way as to speak for the principal branches of industry, with the exception of agricultural labor. The wages of miners, we learn, have increased in Staffordshire (which, almost certainly, is the mining district of lowest increment) by 50 per cent. In the great exportable manufactures of Bradford and Huddersfield, the lowest augmentations are 20 and 30 per cent., and in other branches they rise to 50, 83, 100, and even to 150 and 160 per cent. The quasidomestic trades of carpenters, bricklayers, and masons, in the great marts of Glasgow and Manchester, show a mean increase of 63 per cent. for the first, 65 per cent. for the second, and 47 per cent. for the third. The lowest weekly wage named for an adult is 22s. (as against 17s. in 1833), and the highest 36s. But it is the relative
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Chapter 5: the crisis (search)
ame a response to that appeal, a response from one whose mere name was a summary of the traditions he spoke for. The audience here began to leave the Hall, continues Mr. May, but were arrested by a voice in their midst. It was the voice of Gamaliel Bradford, not a member of the Anti-Slavery Society, who had come there only as a spectator, but had been so moved by what he had witnessed that he pronounced an eloquent, thrilling, impassioned, but respectful appeal in favor of free discussion. When Bradford sat down Mr. George Bond, one of the most prominent merchants and estimable gentlemen of Boston, made a speech to the same effect. Abolition thus began to penetrate the stalwart and sensible classes. It could no longer be regarded as merely the infatuation of foolish persons. There were still to be years of struggle, but the loneliness was at an end. The great shattering climax of all this period was the murder of Elijah P. Lovejoy, a young Presbyterian minister and native of M
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Index (search)
urce of G.'s power, 164-166. Birney, James G., 103, 018, 118. Bond, George, 128. Boston, G. mobbed in, 101, 102, 113 if.; Abolitionists in, 112, 113; Pro-slavery men in, 120, 121; Garrison mob in, the sticking-point of violence in, 118. And see Faneuil Hall, Park St. Church. Boston aristocracy, and J. Q. Adams, 92. Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society, 113. Boston Tea Party, and the murder of Lovejoy, 130, 131. Bowditch, Henry I., quoted, 19, 20 and n.; 21, 108, 123. Bradford, Gamaliel, 127, 128. Bright, John, quoted, 249; 96, 251. British working-classes, and G., 249, 250; and the Civil War, 250. Broadway Tabernacle, Anti-slavery meeting at. See Rynders Mob. Brougham, Henry, Lord, quoted, in Thompson, 92. Brown, John, and Northern opinion, 257. Buchanan, James, 23, 258. Buffum, Arnold, 71. Bunyan, John, 35. Burleigh, C. C., quoted, in Boston Mob, 116; 73. Buxton, Thomas F., 245, 246. Cairnes, J. E., 251. Calhoun, John C., 7, 23, 140, 158, 19
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
gislature, Robert Rantoul, then a Democrat, and at the beginning of his honorable political career. George S. Hillard, a lawyer like Rantoul, afterwards an eminent orator; but his course in regard to slavery was an anti-climax. Dr. Follen, Dr. Bradford, Gamaliel Bradford. myself, etc., etc. The evening was profitably spent in earnest discussion of some of the great topics of reform. The visitors left about half-past 10 o'clock. I went home and tarried with the Chapmans. Yesterday afternGamaliel Bradford. myself, etc., etc. The evening was profitably spent in earnest discussion of some of the great topics of reform. The visitors left about half-past 10 o'clock. I went home and tarried with the Chapmans. Yesterday afternoon, Mr. May, Mr. Goodell and myself Sunday, March 6, 1836. attended meeting in the African meeting-house, Belknap Street. Our colored friends beheld us gladly, and were particularly careful to let me know how happy they felt to hear that Mrs. G. had got a fine little son. Indeed, that event tickles them beyond measure. We are doubly dear to them on that account. My Sonnets seem to be universally admired. Mr. May said that Mr. Alcott wept as he read them, with excess of feeling. A Bronson
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
tters to his constituents (Lib. 7: 36, 56, 57, 61, 66, 69, and pamphlet), that as a pledge that the whole influence, official and personal, of the President of the United States shall be applied to sustain and perpetuate the institution of slavery, it is a melancholy prognostic of a new system of administration, of which the dearest interests of New England will be the first victims, and of which the ultimate result can be no other than the dissolution of the Union. Children of Carver, and Bradford, and Winslow, and Alden! concluded the old man eloquent, ——the pen drops from my hand (Lib. 7: 69). From these summits the policy of repression expanded downwards. The Washington National Intelligencer voluntarily Lib. 7.61. padlocked its own lips, agreeing to exclude all discussion of slavery from its columns except as occurring in the Congressional proceedings. The press of the District Lib. 7.66. generally garbled even these. Elsewhere, editors began injuriously to misreport the s
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 9: organization: New-England Anti-slavery Society.—Thoughts on colonization.—1832. (search)
called for the names of those who were ready to join it. On Sunday evening, the first of January, 1832, the draft of the constitution was reported to a meeting containing some new faces; among them, Alonzo Lewis, William Joseph Snelling, Dr. Gamaliel Bradford, Dr. Bradford was a graduate of Harvard College (1814), and from 1833 to the close of his life in 1839 was Superintendent of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Abner Phelps, and the Rev. Abijah Blanchard, editor of an anti-masonicDr. Bradford was a graduate of Harvard College (1814), and from 1833 to the close of his life in 1839 was Superintendent of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Abner Phelps, and the Rev. Abijah Blanchard, editor of an anti-masonic religious paper, who opened the meeting with prayer. The body of the constitution was adopted, with a few unimportant alterations and additions, as the records read, but also with one highly significant of the conservative influences against which Mr. Garrison had had to contend in committee: Voted, that Philo-African be struck out [of the first article, denoting the Society's title], and New-England Anti-slavery be substituted. The choice marked the dominance of the same positive and aggress
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