hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 6 results in 2 document sections:

te to World's Convention, 353, 354, favors admission of women, 370, 382, at Dr. Bowring's, 378, with O'Connell, 379, at Crown and Anchor Soiree, 384, return to U. S., 416; votes for Harrison, 428.—Letter from G., 2.354.—Portraits in Memorial. Bradford, Gamaliel [b. Boston, Nov. 17, 1795; d. there Oct. 22, 1839], a founder of N. E. A. S. S., 1.278; at E. G. Loring's, 2.99. Bradford, Lydia, 1.476. Bradford, William, 1.476, 2.198. Braithwaite, Anne, 2.384. Braithwaite, Isaac, 2.384. BraziBradford, Lydia, 1.476. Bradford, William, 1.476, 2.198. Braithwaite, Anne, 2.384. Braithwaite, Isaac, 2.384. Brazil, abolitionists considered traitors, 1.389. Breckinridge, John, Rev. [1797-1841], interview with G., 1.448, speech in Boston, 449. Breckinridge, Robert J., Rev. [1800-1871], colonization visit to Boston, 1.448-450; treatment in Providence, 450; debate with G. Thompson and charge against G., 449, 2.83; denounces Penn. Hall, 218. Brewer, —, Mr. (of Providence, R. I.), 1.314. Brewster, Benjamin H., 1.342. Brewster, Edmund, 1.342. Brice, Nicholas, presides at temperance meeting, 1.1<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
orce of this ignorance and prejudice even in the most enlightened and unbigoted and humanitarian circles. At Concord, Mass., on his Middlesex County lecturing tour, Charles C. Burleigh A native of Plainfield, Conn., born in 1810, and one of a highly-gifted family of brothers. His father, Rinaldo Burleigh, was a graduate of Yale (1803), acquired a high reputation as teacher of the academy in Plainfield, and became president of the first anti-slavery society in Windham Co. His mother, Lydia Bradford, a native of Canterbury, was a lineal descendant of Governor Wm. Bradford, of the Mayflower. Charles Burleigh was admitted to the bar in January, 1835, his examination showing remarkable proficiency. Already, however, his editorial defence of Miss Crandall (ante. p. 416) had committed him to the cause of abolition, and he soon exchanged his brilliant professional prospects for the hardships, odium, and perils of an anti-slavery lecturer. As an orator he was unsurpassed in fluency, logi