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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 90 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 45 1 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 22 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 22 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 7 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Almanacs, American. (search)
Almanacs, American. No copy is known to exist of the almanac of 1639. the first published in America. calculated for New England by William Pierce, mariner; another, the Boston almanac, by John Foster, 1676. William Bradford at Philadelphia published an almanac of twenty pages, 1685. commonly received as the first almanac published in the colonies; a copy from the Brinley library sold in New York, March, 1882, for $555.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bradford, William, 1588-1657 (search)
Bradford, William, 1588-1657 Colonial governor; born in Austerfield, Yorkshire, England, in March, 1588; was a passenger in the Mayflower. At the early age of seventeen years he made an attempt to leave England with dissenters, for Holland, and suffered imprisonment. He finally joined his dissenting brethren at Amsterdam, learned the art of silk-dyeing, and, coming into the possession of a considerable estate at the age of twenty-one years, he engaged successfully in commerce. One of Mr. Robinson's congregation at Leyden, he accompanied the Pilgrims to America, and was one of the foremost in selecting a site for the colony. Before the Pilgrims landed, his wife fell into the sea from the Mayflower, and was drowned. He succeeded John Carver (April 5, 1621) as governor of Plymouth colony. He cultivated friendly relations with the Indians; and he was annually rechosen governor as long as he lived, excepting in five years. He wrote a history of Plymouth colony from 1620 to 16
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brewster, William, 1560-1644 (search)
entered the service of William Davidson, ambassador of Queen Elizabeth in Holland. The ambassador was much attached to Brewster, and procured for him the office of postmaster at Scrooby. When his mind was turned very seriously towards religious subjects, he withdrew from the Church of England, and established a dissenting society, or rather a society of Separatists. This new society worshipped on Sabbath days at Mr. Brewster's house until persecution began to interrupt them. He, with Mr. Bradford and others, was among those who attempted to fly to Holland in 1607. (See Robinson, John.) They were arrested and imprisoned at Boston in Lincolnshire. As Mr. Brewster had the most property, he was the greater sufferer. At much expense he gained his liberty, and then he assisted the poorer members of the church to escape, following them himself soon afterwards. At Leyden he opened a school for teaching the English language, to replenish his exhausted funds, He had then been an elder a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cabinet, President's (search)
James N. TynerJuly 12, 1876 David McK. KeyMarch12, 1877 Horace Maynard June2, 1880 Thomas L. JamesMarch 5, 1881 Timothy O. HoweDec. 20, 1881 Walter Q. GreshamApril 3, 1883 Frank Hatton Oct. 14, 1884 William F. VilasMarch 6, 1885 Don M. DickinsonJan. 16, 1888 John Wanamaker March 5, 1889 Wilson S. BissellMarch 6, 1893 William L. WilsonFeb. 28, 1895 James A. GaryMarch 5, 1897 Charles E. SmithApril21, 1898 March 5, 1901 Attorneys-General. Edmund Randolph Sept.26,1789 William BradfordJan.27,1794 Charles Lee Dec. 10,1795 Theophilus Parsons Feb. 20,1801 Levi Lincoln March 5,1801 Robert Smith March 3,1805 John Breckinridge Aug. 7,1805 Caesar A. RodneyJan. 28,1807 William Pinkney Dec. 11,1811 Richard Rush Feb. 10,1814 William WirtNov.13,1817 John M. BerrienMarch 9,1829 Roger B. TaneyJuly 20,1831 Benjamin F. ButlerNov. 15,1833 Felix Grundy July 5,1838 Henry D. GilpinJan. 11,1840 John J. Crittenden March 5,1841 Hugh S. LegareSept.13,1841 John Nelson Jul
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Canonicus (search)
Canonicus Indian chief; king of the Narragansets; born about 1565. He was at first unwilling to be friendly with the Pilgrims at New Plymouth. To show his contempt and defiance of the English, he sent a message to Governor Bradford with a bundle of arrows in a rattlesnake's skin. That was at the dead of winter, 1622. It was a challenge to engage in war in the spring. Like the venomous serpent that wore the skin, the symbol of hostility gave warning before the blow should be struck—a virtue seldom exercised by the Indians. Bradford acted wisely. He accepted the challenge by sending the significant quiver back filled with gunpowder and shot. What can these things be? inquired the ignorant and curious savage mind, as the ammunition was carried from village to village, in superstitious awe, as objects of evil omen. They had heard of the great guns at the sea-side, and they dared not keep the mysterious symbols of the governor's anger, but sent them back to Plymouth as toke
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Deane, Charles, 1813-1889 (search)
Deane, Charles, 1813-1889 Historian; born in Biddeford, Me., Nov. 10, 1813; became a member of the chief historical societies of the country; author of Some notices of Samuel Gorton; First Plymouth patent; Bibliography of Governor Hutchinson's publications; Wingfield's discourse of Virginia; Smith's true relation; and editor of Bradford's history of Plymouth plantation, etc. He died in Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 13, 1889.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Drama, early American. (search)
Drama, early American. As early as 1733, there appears to have been a sort of theatrical performance in the city of New York. In October of that year, George Talbot, a merchant, published a notice in Bradford's Gazette, directing inquiries to be made at his store next door to the Play-house. In 1750 some young Englishmen and Americans got up a coffee-house representation of Otway's Orphans in Boston. The pressure for entrance to the novelty was so great that a disturbance arose, which gave the authorities reason for taking measures for the suppression of such performances. At the next session of the legislature a law was made prohibiting theatrical entertainments, because, as it was expressed in the preamble, they tended not only to discourage industry and frugality, but likewise greatly to increase immorality, impiety, and a contempt for religion. Regular theatrical performances were introduced into America soon afterwards, when, in 1752, a company of actors from London, le
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Excise, first. (search)
d important secrets, which made it necessary for the military to act, and called upon the militia to muster, on Aug. 1, at Braddock's Field, with arms and accoutrements and provisions for four days. Fully 7,000 men appeared at the appointed rendezvous. The leaders in the insurrection were elated. The meeting at Parkinson's Ferry was an armed convention. Colonel Cook, one of the judges of Fayette county, presided, and Albert Gallatin (afterwards Secretary of the Navy) acted as secretary. Bradford assumed the office of majorgeneral and reviewed the troops. It was his design to get possession of Fort Pitt and the arms and ammunition therein, but finding most of the militia officers unwilling to co-operate, he abandoned the project. The excise officers were expelled from the district, and many outrages were committed. The insurrectionary spirit spread into the neighboring counties of Virginia. The reign of terror was extended and complete, when President Washington, acting with e
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts, (search)
Massachusetts colonies. Plymouth colony, elected. Name.Term. John Carver1620 to 1621 William Bradford1621 to 1633 Edward Winslow1633 to 1634 Thomas Prince1634 to 1635 William Bradford1635 toWilliam Bradford1635 to 1636 Edward Winslow1636 to 1637 William Bradford1637 to 1638 Thomas Prince1638 to 1639 William Bradford1639 to 1644 Edward Winslow1644 to 1645 William Bradford1645 to 1657 Thomas Prince1657 toWilliam Bradford1637 to 1638 Thomas Prince1638 to 1639 William Bradford1639 to 1644 Edward Winslow1644 to 1645 William Bradford1645 to 1657 Thomas Prince1657 to 1673 Josiah Winslow1673 to 1681 Thomas Hinkley1681 to 1686 Sir Edmund Andros, governor-general1686 to 1689 Thomas Hinkley1689 to 1692 Massachusetts Bay colony. Name.Term. John Endicott (actiWilliam Bradford1639 to 1644 Edward Winslow1644 to 1645 William Bradford1645 to 1657 Thomas Prince1657 to 1673 Josiah Winslow1673 to 1681 Thomas Hinkley1681 to 1686 Sir Edmund Andros, governor-general1686 to 1689 Thomas Hinkley1689 to 1692 Massachusetts Bay colony. Name.Term. John Endicott (acting)1629 to 1630 Matthew Cradock (did not serve) John Winthrop1630 to 1634 Thomas Dudley1634 to 1635 John Haynes1635 to 1636 Henry Vane1636 to 1637 John Winthrop1637 to 1640 Thomas Dudley1640 toWilliam Bradford1645 to 1657 Thomas Prince1657 to 1673 Josiah Winslow1673 to 1681 Thomas Hinkley1681 to 1686 Sir Edmund Andros, governor-general1686 to 1689 Thomas Hinkley1689 to 1692 Massachusetts Bay colony. Name.Term. John Endicott (acting)1629 to 1630 Matthew Cradock (did not serve) John Winthrop1630 to 1634 Thomas Dudley1634 to 1635 John Haynes1635 to 1636 Henry Vane1636 to 1637 John Winthrop1637 to 1640 Thomas Dudley1640 to 1641 Richard Bellingham1641 to 1642 John Winthrop1642 to 1644 governors of the Massachusetts colonies— Continued. Massachusetts Bay colony. Name.Term. John Endicott1644 to 1645 Thomas Dud
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massasoit, 1580- (search)
he dusky people were taken to a building where a rug and cushions were prepared for the king and his courtiers, and there, sitting in state, he received Governor Carver, who came with a braying trumpet and beaten drum. Squanto acted as interpreter. A treaty of peace and amity was concluded, which was never broken by either party while Massasoit lived. The old sachem sent messengers to other tribes, inviting them to come and make peace with the white people. In the summer of 1621, Governor Bradford sent two envoys (Winslow and Hopkins) to Massasoit, at Pokanoket, near Narraganset Bay, 40 miles from Plymouth. They were kindly received by the king, who renewed the covenant with the English. When he had taken the ambassadors into his dwelling, heard their message, and received presents from them, he put on the horseman's scarlet coat which they had given him, and a chain about his neck, which made his people proud to behold their king so bravely attired. Having given a friendly a
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