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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 78 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 4 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 9 9 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion. You can also browse the collection for Bradford or search for Bradford in all documents.

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L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Keller or Killdare, one of the scouts of the Army of the Cumberland. (search)
One or two minor cases of smuggling were developed by him. He subsequently reported that he had become acquainted with the cashier of the Planters' Bank, and a Mrs. Bradford, who lived five miles from the city, and made herself very busy in carrying letters, in which she was aided by Cantrell, the cashier. He was also in the habom was Archy Cheatham. He also was a member of a club or association which met every Saturday, to devise ways and means for aiding the rebellion, and at which Mrs. Bradford and Cantrell were constant attendants. One day he reported that Mrs. Bradford was just going to carry out what was ostensibly a barrel of flour, but really a Mrs. Bradford was just going to carry out what was ostensibly a barrel of flour, but really a barrel of contraband goods covered over with flour at each end. And so it went on from week to week. Somebody was just going to do something, but never did it, or was never detected; and, despite the many fair promises of Stewart, the results of his labors were not deemed satisfactory. On the night that Killdare came in from hi
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Part 2: daring enterprises of officers and men. (search)
carried to places of security, until such time as they would be able to move on their journey. At half-past 2 o'clock, Captain Joyce, Colonel Kendrick, and Lieutenant Bradford passed out in the order in which they are named, and as Colonel Kendrick emerged from the hole he heard the guard within a few feet of him sing out: Post No. 7, half-past 2 in the morning and all is well. Lieutenant Bradford was intrusted with the provisions for this squad, and in getting through was obliged to leave his haversack behind him, as he could not get through with it upon him. Once out they proceeded up the street, keeping in the shade of the buildings, and passed eastww was a difficulty. The river was only twenty feet wide, but it was very deep, and the refugees were worn out and fatigued. Chancing, however, to look up, Lieutenant Bradford saw that two trees had fallen on either side of the river, and that their branches were interlocked. By crawling up one tree and down the other, the fugiti
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, How the prisoners escaped prom the Richmond jail-incredible underground work-friendship of Virginia negroes. (search)
carried to places of security, until such time as they would be able to move on their journey. At half-past 2 o'clock, Captain Joyce, Colonel Kendrick, and Lieutenant Bradford passed out in the order in which they are named, and as Colonel Kendrick emerged from the hole he heard the guard within a few feet of him sing out: Post No. 7, half-past 2 in the morning and all is well. Lieutenant Bradford was intrusted with the provisions for this squad, and in getting through was obliged to leave his haversack behind him, as he could not get through with it upon him. Once out they proceeded up the street, keeping in the shade of the buildings, and passed eastww was a difficulty. The river was only twenty feet wide, but it was very deep, and the refugees were worn out and fatigued. Chancing, however, to look up, Lieutenant Bradford saw that two trees had fallen on either side of the river, and that their branches were interlocked. By crawling up one tree and down the other, the fugiti