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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 78 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 4 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 9 9 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 5 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Bradford or search for Bradford in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
ed to Vicksburg, received a new one about the 15th of February. Major Bradford established himself there with about two hundred and fifty men,garrison of Fort Pillow. All the soldiers of this garrison and Major Bradford were natives of Tennessee—the greater part even of the vicinityded almost at the same moment. He is succeeded in his command by Bradford, who has neither his experience nor his coolness. As soon as hi dislodged from their outworks and hastily fall back to the fort. Bradford orders the burning of the barracks, which are at a distance of onlase, and sends a flag of truce to propose an honorable surrender. Bradford, after some parley, refuses to surrender. Must we believe that heer by his firing the garrison sheltered on the bank of the river. Bradford, as a last resort, relied upon this combination—a very chimerical bringing assistance to the garrison: this thought perhaps induced Bradford to reject Forrest's propositions; and, on the other hand, the assa