Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for W. H. Bradley or search for W. H. Bradley in all documents.

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venth Kentucky cavalry, right side; Captain Jos. B. McClintock, Home Guards, leg and arms; John McClintock, do., right hip; Alfred McCauley, Seventh Kentucky cavalry, back; Thomas Barry, Cincinnati artillery, right thigh; L. A. Funk, heel; Capt. W. H. Bradley, Seventh Kentucky cavalry, left leg; L. C. Rankin, Home Guards, left shoulder, slight; Rev. Carter Page, do., leg, very slight; James S. Frizell, do., side, very slight; J. F. L. St. Thomas, do., chest and face; Jas. F. Dickey, do., should arm. John McClintock, Home Guard, right hip. Alfred McCauley, Seventh Kentucky cavalry, back. Thomas Barry, Home Guard, right thigh. L. A. Funk, Ohio, heel. Lewis Terry, Home Guard, leg, twice. G. Land, Home Guard, foot. Capt. Bradley, Seventh Kentucky cavalry, leg. Leroy Rankin, Home Guard, left shoulder. Rev. Carter Page, Home Guard, leg. James S. Frizell, Home Guard, side, slightly. Mr. St. Thomas, Home Guard, chest and face. James Dickey, Home Guard, bot
ed or wounded, their colors shot to pieces, the color-sergeant killed, every one of the color-guard wounded. Only thirty-two were afterward got together. The Fifteenth Massachusetts went into action with seventeen officers and nearly six hundred men. Nine officers were killed or wounded, and some of the latter are prisoners. Capt. Simons, Capt. Saunders of the sharp-shooters, Lieut. Derby, and Lieut. Berry are killed. Capt. Bartlett and Capt. Jocelyn, Lieut. Spurr, Lieut. Gale, and Lieut. Bradley are wounded. One hundred and thirty-four men were the only remains that could be collected of this splendid regiment. Gen. Dana was wounded. Gen. Howard, who took command of the division after Gen. Sedgwick was disabled, exerted himself to restore order; but it could not be done there. Gen. Sumner ordered the line to be re-formed. The test was too severe for volunteer, troops under such a fire. Sumner himself attempted to arrest the disorder, but to little purpose. Lieut.-Col. R
ed or wounded, their colors shot to pieces, the color-sergeant killed, every one of the color-guard wounded. Only thirty-two were afterward got together. The Fifteenth Massachusetts went into action with seventeen officers and nearly six hundred men. Nine officers were killed or wounded, and some of the latter are prisoners. Capt. Simons, Capt. Saunders of the sharp-shooters, Lieut. Derby, and Lieut. Berry are killed. Capt. Bartlett and Capt. Jocelyn, Lieut. Spurr, Lieut. Gale, and Lieut. Bradley are wounded. One hundred and thirty-four men were the only remains that could be collected of this splendid regiment. Gen. Dana was wounded. Gen. Howard, who took command of the division after Gen. Sedgwick was disabled, exerted himself to restore order; but it could not be done there. Gen. Sumner ordered the line to be re-formed. The test was too severe for volunteer, troops under such a fire. Sumner himself attempted to arrest the disorder, but to little purpose. Lieut.-Col. R
hile, another portion of the Indian force passed down a ravine on the right, with a view to outflank the Third regiment, and I ordered Lieut.-Colonel Marshall, who, with the five companies of the Seventh regiment, and who was ably seconded by Major Bradley, to advance to its support, with one six-pounder under the command of Captain Hendricks, and I also ordered two companies of the Sixth regiment to reenforce him. Lieut.-Colonel Marshall advanced at a double quick, amidst a shower of balls ed against night attack, should it be attempted, although I think the lesson received by them today will make them very cautious for the future. I have already adverted to the courage and skill of Lieut.-Colonel Marshall, and Majors Welch and Bradley, to which I beg leave to add those of the officers and men under their respective commands. Lieut.-Colonel Averill and Major McLaren were equally prompt in their movements in preparing the Sixth regiment for action, and were both under fire for