hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 958 6 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 615 3 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 562 2 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 454 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 380 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 343 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 340 20 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 339 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 325 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 308 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary. You can also browse the collection for Braxton Bragg or search for Braxton Bragg in all documents.

Your search returned 282 results in 32 document sections:

1 2 3 4
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, I. April, 1861 (search)
vities. Among the passengers was Major Holmes, who had just resigned his commission in the U. S. army. He had been ordered to proceed with the expedition against Charleston; but declined the honor of fighting against his native land. The major is a little deaf, but has an intellectual face, the predominant expression indicating the discretion and prudence so necessary for success in a large field of operations. In reply to a question concerning the military qualities of Beauregard and Bragg, he said they were the flower of the young officers of the U. S. army. The first had great genius, and was perhaps the most dashing and brilliant officer in the country; the other, more sedate, nevertheless possessed military capacities of a very high order. President Davis, in his opinion, had made most excellent selections in the appointment of his first generals. The major, however, was very sad at the prospect before us; and regarded the tenders of pecuniary aid to the U. S. by the Wa
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, X. January, 1862 (search)
tions that his friends in office were likewise the partisans of President Tyler. January 17 A Mr. O. Hendricks, verylately of the U. S. Coast Survey, has returned from a tour of the coast of North Carolina, and has been commissioned a lieutenant by the Secretary of War. He says Burnside will take Roanoke Island, and that Wise and all his men will be captured. It is a man-trap. January 18 Gen. L. P. Walker, the first Secretary of War, is assigned to duty in the Southwest under Gen. Bragg. How can he obey the orders of one who was so recently under his command? I think it probable he will resign again before the end of the campaign. January 19 There has been a storm on the coast, sinking some of the enemy's ships. Col. Allen, of New Jersey, was lost. He was once at my house in Burlington, and professed to be friendly to the Southern cause. I think he said he owned land and slaves in Texas. January 20 Mr. Memminger advertises to pay interest on certain gove
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 16 (search)
ements for a flight to France; and Gen. Beauregard getting intimation of an order to move certain sums in bullion in the custody of an Assistant Treasurer in his military department, forbid its departure until he could be certain that it was not destined to leave the Confederacy. I have not learned its ultimate destination; but the victory of the Seven Pines intervening, Gen. Beauregard has been relieved of his command, on sick leave. But I know his army is to be commanded permanently by Gen. Bragg. There are charges against Beauregard. It is said the Yankee army might have been annihilated at Shiloh, if Beauregard had fought a little longer. June 23 And Gen. Johnston, I learn, has had his day. And Magruder is on sick leave. He is too open in his censures of the late Secretary of War. But Gen. Huger comes off scotfree; he has always had the confidence of Mr. Benjamin, and used to send the flag of truce to Fortress Monroe as often as could be desired. June 24 Gen. Lee
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 17 (search)
rn Virginia, and Gen. Halleck has been made commanding general, to reside in Washington. Good! The Yankees are disgracing McClellan, the best general they have. July 8 Glorious Col. Morgan has dashed into Kentucky, whipped everything before him, and got off unharmed. He had but little over a thousand men, and captured that number of prisoners. Kentucky will rise in a few weeks. July 9 Lee has turned the tide, and I shall not be surprised if we have a long career of successes. Bragg, and Kirby Smith, and Loring are in motion at last, and Tennessee and Kentucky, and perhaps Missouri, will rise again in Rebellion. July 10 -I forgot to note in its place a feat of Gen. Stuart and his cavalry, before the recent battles. He made a complete girdle around the enemy, destroying millions of their property, and returned without loss. He was reconnoitering for Jackson, who followed in his track. This made Stuart major-general. I likewise omitted to note the death of th
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 19 (search)
n. Smith, of New York. Since Gen. Smith has been in command, the enemy has made raids to Leesburg, Manassas, and even Warrenton, capturing and paroling our sick and wounded men. Who is responsible? Accounts from Nashville state that our cavalry is beleaguering that city, and that both the United States forces there, and the inhabitants of the town, are reduced nearly to starvation. Buell, it is said, has reached Louisville. We hope to hear soon of active operations in Kentucky. Bragg, and Smith, and Price, and Marshall are there with abundant forces to be striking heavy blows. Beauregard is assigned to the defense of South Carolina and Georgia. Harper's Ferry is again occupied by the enemy-but we have removed everything captured there. The Northern papers now admit that the sanguinary battle of Sharpsburg was without result. I sent my wife money to-day, and urged her to return to Richmond as soon as possible, as the enemy may cut the communications-being wit
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XIX. October, 1862 (search)
ediate advance of McClellan. still a rumor of Bragg's victory in Kentucky. enemy getting large restimate of conscripts and all others, 500,000 Bragg retreating from Kentucky. bickering between Bl the enemy, without waiting for orders from Gen. Bragg, now in Kentucky. The President considers tn Kentucky-but I shall wait until we hear from Bragg. Gen. Magruder has been assigned to duty i There is a rumor, generally credited, that Bragg has led the enemy, in Kentucky, into an ambuscl unofficial, we have confirmatory accounts of Bragg's victory in Kentucky. The enemy lost, they sr arrived from Kentucky, reports a victory for Bragg, and that he has taken over 10,000 prisoners. finite from Kentucky, more than the retreat of Bragg. Gen. Loring is here-he would not act upon thot been unjustly deprived of the command. But Bragg chose to make a plan of his own, or was directhe liberties of the people. October 28 Gen. Bragg is here, but will not probably be deprived o[14 more...]
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XX. November, 1862 (search)
the elections in the North. Everything depends upon the result of approaching military operations. If the enemy be defeated, and the Democrats of the North should call for a National Convention-but why anticipate? November 20 A letter from Brig. H. Marshall, Abingdon, Ky., in reply to one from the Secretary, says his Kentuckians are not willing to be made Confederate hog-drivers, but they will protect the commissary's men in collecting and removing the hogs. Gen. M. criticises Gen. Bragg's campaign very severely. He says the people of Kentucky looked upon their fleeting presence as a horse-show, or military pageantry, and not as indicating the stern reality of war. Hence they did not rise in arms, and hence their diffidence in following the fortunes of the new Confederacy. Gen. M. asks if it is the purpose of the government to abandon Kentucky, and if so, is he not functus officio, being a Kentucky general, commanding Kentucky troops? Col. Myers has placed on file in
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 22 (search)
t exceeding 250,000; but they are not aware of that. December 10 Not a word from the Rappahannock. But there soon will be. Official dispatches from Gen. Bragg confirm the achievement of Col. Morgan, acting as brigadier-general. There was a fight, several hundred being killed and wounded on both sides; but Morgan's vi has written from the West a gloomy letter to Mr. Wigfall, Texan Senator. He says he is ordered to reinforce Lieut.-Gen. Pemberton (another Northern general) from Bragg's army. Pemberton is retreating on Grenada, Mississippi, followed by 40,000 of the enemy. How is he, Gen. J., to get from Tennessee to Grenada with reinforcementad. We have many prisoners, but I have heard no estimate of the number. The enemy have taken Kinston, N. C., having overwhelming numbers, and a letter from Gen. Bragg, dated at Raleigh, yesterday, says it is probable Goldsborough will fall into their hands. This will cut our railroad communication with Wilmington, which may
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXII. January, 1863 (search)
is a Western dispatch, it is true, but it has Bragg's name to it, and he does not willingly exaggen ordnance train, and making more prisoners. Bragg says the enemy's telegraphic and railroad comm absurd rumor was invented, to the effect that Bragg had been beaten. We are anxious to learn the e battle. It is to be feared that too many of Bragg's men were ordered to reinforce Pemberton. I January 6 To-day we are all down again. Bragg has retreated from Murfreesborough. It is sai field. Eight thousand men were taken from Bragg a few days before the battle. It was not done only a marauding expedition. And he supposes Bragg's splendid victory (what did he suppose the nwhich is believed to be reliable, stating that Bragg captured 6000 prisoners altogether in his late conscripts in the West have been ordered to Gen. Bragg. Shall we starve? Yesterday beef was sohe sudden rise is caused by the prisoners of Gen. Bragg, several thousand of whom have arrived here,[11 more...]
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, Xxiv. March, 1863 (search)
of the brokers are demanding ten dollars Confederate notes for one in gold! That is bad, and it may be worse. The enemy are advancing from Corinth, and there are not sufficient troops to resist them. Gen. Johnston says if men are taken from Bragg, his army may be destroyed; and none can be ordered from Mobile, where there are only 2500 for land defense. March 20 The snow is eight inches deep this morning, and it is still falling fast. Not a beggar is yet to be seen in this city rtunes accumulated by the speculators, turning to dust and ashes on their lips, might engender a new exasperation, resulting in a regenerated patriotism and a universal determination to achieve independence or die in the attempt. March 30 Gen. Bragg dispatches the government that Gen. Forrest has captured 800 prisoners in Tennessee, and several thousand of our men are making a successful raid in Kentucky. Gen. Whiting makes urgent calls for reinforcements at Wilmington, and cannot be s
1 2 3 4