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r. Orr earnestly opposed the bill. Notwithstanding the expression given by the Military Committee at the last session against such a measure as the bill contemplated, and in violation of existing laws providing the mode of vacating commission, Gen. Bragg had reduced officers to the ranks and placed privates in their stead. He was not informed whether the Secretary of War had approved of General Bragg's practice. He supposed the object of the bill was to legalize what General B. had done. TheGeneral Bragg's practice. He supposed the object of the bill was to legalize what General B. had done. The law provided that when a vacancy occurred it was to be filled by the next in rank. Mr. Sparrow stated that abuses of the present system of electing officers were of such magnitude as to imperatively demand immediate reform. He recited instances in support of his position, one of which had come to his knowledge, where a company had elected as their captain a common their. A long discussion ensued on the bill, Messrs. Wigfall, Phelan, and others, favoring it, and Mr. Yancey opposing i
The Daily Dispatch: September 27, 1862., [Electronic resource], Seward's reply to the Paisley Parliamentary Association. (search)
fordsville, Ky., was yesterday, received at the office of the Adjutant General. We append a copy of the dispatch received yesterday, from Knoxville, Tenn., dated September 25th: To General S. Cooper, Adj't Gen'l C. S. A courier from Gen. Bragg's headquarters, eight miles west of Munfordsville, on the night of the 18th inst., confirms the report that Bragg captured about 5,000 men at Munfordsville on the 17th inst. Our loss about 50 killed and wounded. The same courier reports that u Gen'l C. S. A courier from Gen. Bragg's headquarters, eight miles west of Munfordsville, on the night of the 18th inst., confirms the report that Bragg captured about 5,000 men at Munfordsville on the 17th inst. Our loss about 50 killed and wounded. The same courier reports that up to the 12th inst. about 23,000 Kentuckians had joined Gen. Smith, and they were still coming. The Home Guard was delivering up their guns as rapidly as they could be received. Samuel. Jones, Major Gen'l.
Latest from the North. proclamation from Lincoln Liberating slaves — Gen Bragg advancing upon Louisville — the surrender of that city Demanded — heavy Federal loss at Shepherdstown, &c. isville is tremendous. A dispatch from Jeffersonville, dated 22d, says that the rebel Generals, Bragg and Smith, have divided their forces — Smith is to hold Buell, who is marching for Louisville, in check, while Bragg advances on the city. Bragg has summoned Nelson, in command of the army for the defence of Louisville, to surrender. Nelson refused, and has ordered all the women and children Bragg has summoned Nelson, in command of the army for the defence of Louisville, to surrender. Nelson refused, and has ordered all the women and children to leave the city at one hour's notice. Thousands of citizens are crossing the river into Indiana Bragg is some distance from the city, but advancing rapidly. The Herald acknowledges a heavy loBragg is some distance from the city, but advancing rapidly. The Herald acknowledges a heavy loss near Shepherdstown on Saturday. It says the rebels were dressed as Union soldiers, and displayed a flag of truce to induce the Federal to cross the river. Sumner's corps d'arme alone lost 5
The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1862., [Electronic resource], Vice-President Stephens on Martial law. (search)
Vice-President Stephens on Martial law. Gen. Bragg recently declared martial law in Atlanta, Ga, and appointed Hon. James M. Calhoun Military Governor of the city; but Mr. Calhoun, doubtful of his powers sought the counsel of Hon. B. H. Hill and Vice-Pres't Stephens on the subject The latter's reply we find in the Southern Croper answer to he made to your several inquiries touching your powers and duties in the office of Civil Governor of Atlanta, to which you have been appointed by Gen Bragg. I took the letter with the promise to write to you fully upon the whole subject. This, there fore, is the object of my now writing to you. I regret the delay your new position, and your inability to find anything in any written code of laws to enlighten you upon them. The truth is, your office is unknown to the law. Gen. Bragg had no more authority for appointing you civil Governor of Atlanta than I had; and I had, or have, no more authority than any street, walker in your city. Unde
From Tennessee. Chattanooga, Oct. 2. --A company of partisan rangers yesterday drove the Yankee pickets, at Flat Rock, back to Nashville, killing several. Flat Rock is three miles from Nashville. The Nashville Dispatch, of the 30th, says that the steamer Forlorn Hope was captured a few miles below there on Sunday, by the rebels. The impression in Nashville is that Bragg has taken Louisville. Speculators have cleaned out all the goods and stores between here and Nashville. No more need come. There is no doubt about the starving condition of the people in Nashville.
The Daily Dispatch: January 19, 1863., [Electronic resource], The Dashing operations of our cavalry in rear of Rosecrans. (search)
This time the trains were defended by a stoong body of cavalry, has it fled before the charge, and left in our hands seventy-five wagons, two hundred prisoners, and a battery of artillery. The scenes of the first raid were reenacted. Moving back around the enemy's right we rested the next day within of the and unsuccessful cannonade against the enemy's left wing. On the following day we attempted a thud raid upon the rear, out fell back in consequence of the enemy's having guarded his trains with a brigade of infantry and cavalry. We drove the cavalry before us, but were unable to displace the infantry, which resisted us behind the shelter of their wagons. In this attack Major Prentice was wounded, and we regret to say Lieut J. A. Whiting is among the missing. Just at this point a courier reached Gen. Wheeler ordering his return. We hastened back slept two hours on the battle field, and then slowly and sadly wended our way in fear of the retreating army of Gen Bragg.
The New York Herald, speaking of the campaign in Tennessee says the task before Rosecrans is more serious and difficult than that which he has just finished. The labors of Hercules, it says, are but begun. Rosecrans cannot immediately follow Bragg. His army must be recruited, and communication with Nashville and the North be re-established. The Washington correspondent of the Herald says that it is rumored that Rosecrans is falling back for the purpose of getting nearer his base of supplies. The same correspondent says the victory at Murfreesboro''s like the one at Belmont — a barren one. The Philadelphia Inquirer, of the 14th, says Rosecrans will fight Bragg at Tallahomes. The same correspondent states that Rosecrans has received a reinforcement of 20,000 men. The Inquirer says the defeat at Murfreesboro' has only determined Rosecrans upon a new point of attack. Correspondence with rebels. In the U. S. Senate Mr. Sumner, of Massachusetts, asked leave to introduce
What Gen. Bragg's army accomplished. The Atlanta (Ga) Commonwealth has published a communication, prepared carefully by one having a knowledge of the entire campaign, and endorsed by one holding high and responsible civil position, showing what Gen. Bragg's army has no accomplished. Accompanying the article is a tabular staGen. Bragg's army has no accomplished. Accompanying the article is a tabular statement which shows the extraordinary facts that, in addition to having destroyed and captured 74 pieces of artillery, 33,100 muskets, 1,300 wagons, and 5,00 horses and mules, this General has since last August killed wounded, and captured over 60,000 of the enemy, while his own force never amounted to 50,000 men. Is not this a glond capture one that is superior, and take and occupy immense territories? It has seemed to us all the time, and this exhibit confirms us in the opinion that Gen Bragg and his noble army accomplished a great and glorious work; that the capacity of the commanding General has always been underrated, while himself and his brave ar
A few only remain — such as are unable to go. The Mercury and Courier offices have been removed up town, from whence they continue to fire red lot shot at the invader, as in former times. The hotels are kept open, and the "Charleston," where I am stopping, continues to furnish excellent "entertainment for man and beast, " as the old tavern sign-boards were wont to have it.--The Federal army may yet hoist its flag over Charleston, but it will be amidst heaps of ashes and blackened walls, and the charred and fleshless bones of her heroic children. The weather is rough outside to-day, and betokens the approach of an equinoctial gale. The monitors have taken the hint and disappeared. They have probably sought safer anchorage in the Stono, or some of the inlets below. We continue to fire upon the enemy's working parties, day and night, and have the satisfaction of knowing that our fire is not without effect. I go hence to Savannah, and thence to Gen'l Bragg's army. Sallust
The battle in East Tennessee. --Thus far Gen. Bragg seems to be completely victorious. The results are greater than those of any battle fought by the Duke of Wer of the whole Yankee army. There can be no doubt, therefore, that thus far Gen Bragg's success has been brilliant, and that it goes far to redeem all the errors ih of the next. They see Chattanooga, in all its strength, directly in front of Bragg, and they wait to see it retaken before they give way to joy. For the relief of an enemy on the same side with itself, especially if he come from the cast, as Bragg does, it is altogether indefensible. The mountains terminate just there, and pashville. It will all depend, however, on the vigor with which he is pushed by Bragg. That General will shortly receive, or possibly has received, heavy reinforcemand Alabama. It is to be hoped that he will be disappointed in these views. Gen. Bragg has at least made a good start in the attempt to disappoint him. Unless, howe
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