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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 98 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 6 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 19, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
in (La.), Sept. 17, 1861. Secretary of the Navy: Stephen R. Mallory (Fla.), Feb. 25, 1861. Secretary of the Treasury: Charles G. Memminger (S. C.), Feb. 21, 1861. Attorney-General: Judah P. Benjamin, Feb. 25, 1861 Attorney-General: Thomas Bragg, (Ala.), Sept. 17, 1861. Postmaster-General: J. H. Reagan (Texas), March 6, 1861. Ii. Reorganization. (Feb. 22, 1862, to April, 1865.) Secretary of State: R. M. T. Hunter, July 24, 1861 Secretary of State: Judah P. Benjamin, Marchov. 20, 1862 Secretary of War: John C. Breckinridge, Jan. 28, 1865. Secretary of the Navy : Stephen R. Mallory. Secretary of the Treasury: C. G. Memminger Secretary of the Treasury: George A. Trenholm , June, 1864. Attorney-General: Thomas Bragg Attorney-General: Thomas H. Watts (Ala), March 17, 1862 Attorney-General: George Davis (N. C.), 1864-5. Postmaster-General: John H. Reagan. The Confederate States War Department. Secretary of War: (see above). Assistant Secr
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 9: proceedings in Congress.--departure of conspirators. (search)
This amendment, so thoroughly wise and patriotic, and so eminently necessary at that critical moment in averting the most appalling national danger, was adopted by a vote of twenty-five against twenty-three. The vote was as follows:--yeas, Messrs. Anthony, Baker, Bingham, Cameron, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkee, Fessenden, Foote, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson. NAYs, Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Clingman, Crittenden, Fitch, Green, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane of Oregon, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Saulsbury, and Sebastian. The leading conspirators in the Senate, who might have defeated the amendment and carried the Crittenden Compromise, did not vote. This reticence was preconcerted. They had resolved not to accept any terms of adjustment. They were bent on disunion, and acted consistently. See notice of The 1860 Associatio
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 14: the great Uprising of the people. (search)
in its origin; in its association with chivalrous deeds, it is ours. See Frank Moore's Rebellion Record, i. 20. but prudence counseled silence. We went on to Grand Junction the next morning, where we were detained thirty-six hours, in consequence of our luggage having been carried to Jackson, in Tennessee. All along the road, we had seen recruiting-officers gathering up men here and there from the sparse population, to swell the ranks of the insurgents assembling at Pensacola under General Bragg, who had abandoned the old flag. The negroes were quietly at work in the fields, planting cotton, little dreaming of their redemption from Slavery being so nigh. The landlord of the Percey House at Grand Junction was kind and obliging, and made our involuntary sojourn there as agreeable as possible. We were impatient to go forward, for exasperation against Northern men was waxing hot. We amused ourselves nearly half a day, assisting, as the French say, at the raising of a secession
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 24: the called session of Congress.--foreign relations.--benevolent organizations.--the opposing armies. (search)
9, 1861. that it was no part of the duty of the soldiers of the United States to capture and return fugitive slaves. This was proposed by Mr. Lovejoy, of Illinois, and was passed by a vote of ninety-two against fifty-five. The Senate took measures at an early day to purge itself of treasonable members. On the 10th, July. on motion of Mr. Clark, of New Hampshire, it expelled ten Senators who were named, James M. Mason and Robert T. M. Hunter, of Virginia; Thomas L. Clingman and Thomas Bragg, of North Carolina; James Chesnut, Jr., of South Carolina; A. 0. P. Nicholson, of Tennessee; William K. Sebastian and Charles B. Mitchell, of Arkansas; and John Hemphill and Louis T. Wigfall, of Texas. because of their being engaged in a conspiracy for the destruction of the Union and the Government. The resolution for expulsion received the required vote of two-thirds of the Senate (thirty-two against ten); and, on the 13th, the places of Hunter and Mason were filled by John S. Carlile
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 1: effect of the battle of Bull's Run.--reorganization of the Army of the Potomac.--Congress, and the council of the conspirators.--East Tennessee. (search)
es $10 to 216, inclusive. The latter, as we have observed, were, for the sake of humanity, treated as prisoners of war, and in due time the hostages were exchanged. On the establishment of the so-called government at Richmond, Davis's committee of advisers, whom he dignified with the title of Cabinet, was reorganized. R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia, had become his Secretary of State. Judah P. Benjamin, his law officer, was made Secretary of War, and was succeeded in his office by ex-Governor Thomas Bragg, of North Carolina. The other members of the Cabinet were the same as those first appointed. See page 258 In every phase of its organization, the new government ? was modeled after the rejected one; and in form, and numbers, and operations, the Confederacy presented to the world the outward aspect of a respectable nation. Seals were devised for the use of the several Departments ; and on that made for the Department of State, which, more than others, might be seen abroad, was t
h Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Texas, have attempted to withdraw those States from the Union, and are now in arms against the Government; And whereas, James M. Mason and Robert M. T. Hunter, Senators from Virginia; Thomas L. Clingman and Thomas Bragg, Senators from North Carolina; James Chesnut, Jr., a Senator from South Carolina; A. O. P. Nicholson, a Senator from Tennessee; William K. Sebastian and Charles B. Mitchell, Senators from Arkansas; and John Hemphill and Louis T. Wigfall, Senatonspiracy for the destruction of the Union and Government, or, with full knowledge of such conspiracy, have failed to advise the Government of its progress, or aid in its suppression: Therefore, Resolved, That the said Mason, Hunter, Clingman, Bragg, Chesnut, Nicholson, Sebastian, Mitchell, Hemphill, and Wigfall, be, and they hereby are, each and all of them, expelled from the Senate of the United States. Messrs. Bayard, of Del., and Latham, of Cal., sought to have this so modified as me
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence and fall of Fort Fisher. (search)
has been summoned to his final account. The letter bears date Wilmington, January 20, 1865, and was written to Ex-Governor Thomas Bragg. General Bragg wrote: Two hours before hearing of the certain fall of the fort I felt as confident as ever mGeneral Bragg wrote: Two hours before hearing of the certain fall of the fort I felt as confident as ever man did of successfully defending it. Further on he puts his certain information at a time which shows that the fort had fallen when he was confident of successfully defending it. To know the position of the enemy, to be informed promptly of the nity to watch the movements of the enemy, and direct the management of his forces with such slight personal danger as General Bragg. The Cape Fear river, with its channel at least three-quarters of a mile from the open beach upon which the enemy haery Buchanan and on the Mound, perfectly secure on the western shore of the river and on the right flank of his camp, General Bragg could have watched the Second attack upon Fort Fisher. progress of the enemy and directed his forces by day; then
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
t locomotives, valued at $400,000, belonging to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, were destroyed by the Confederates at Martinsburg, Va.—July 11. The United States Senate expelled from that body James M. Mason, R. M. T. Hunter, T. L. Clingman, Thomas Bragg, Louis T. Wigfall, J. A. Hemphill, Charles B. Mitchell, W. K. Sebastian, and A. O. P. Nicholson, charged with treasonable acts.—25. The governor of New York called for 25,000 more troops.—Aug. 16. Several newspapers in New York presented by al troops.—13. Brilliant cavalry engagement at Culpeper Court-House, Va.—21. Sharp cavalry fight and National victory at Madison Court-House, Va.—24. Port of Alexandria. Va., officially declared to be open to trade. —Oct. 5. Confederates under Bragg bombarded Chattanooga, Tenn., from Lookout Mountain.—7. The British government seized the Confederate rams building in the Mersey, and forbid their departure.—10. Confederates defeated at Blue Springs, Tenn.—17. The President ord
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Congress, National (search)
aid in enforcing the laws and protecting public property; 3. To increase the present military establishment of the United States; 4. To provide for the better organization of the military establishment; 5. To promote the efficiency of the army; 6. For the organization of a volunteer militia force, to be called the National Guard of the United States. At an early day the Senate expelled the following ten Senators: James M. Mason and R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia; Thomas L. Clingman and Thomas Bragg, of North Carolina; James Chestnut, Jr., of South Carolina; A. O. P. Nicholson, of Tennessee; W. K. Sebastian and Charles B. Mitchell, of Arkansas; and John Hemphill and Louis T. Wigfall, of Texas. On July 13 the places of Mason and Hunter were filled by John S. Carlisle and W. J. Willey, appointed by the legislature of reorganized (West) Virginia. On the same day John B. Clark, of Missouri, was expelled from the House of Representatives. Every measure for the suppression of the rebel
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Corinth, operations at (search)
the night of May 29 the National sentinels had heard the incessant roar of moving railway-cars at Corinth; and at daybreak, just as Halleck sent out skirmishers to feel the enemy, the earth was shaken with a series of explosions, and dense columns of smoke arose above the town. There was no enemy to feel ; Beauregard had evacuated Corinth during the night, burned and blown up whatever of stores he could not carry away, and fled in haste to Turpelo, many miles southward, where he left General Bragg in command of the Confederate forces (now called the Army of the Mississippi), and repaired to Mineral Springs, in Alabama, for the restoration of his impaired health. Halleck took possession of Corinth, and was soon afterwards called to Washington to perform the duties of general-inchief of all the armies of the republic. He left General Thomas in command at Corinth, and General Grant of his old army, with enlarged powers. At Ripley, Miss., the troops of Price and Van Dorn were con
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