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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 77 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sixty-nine Federals in sight of their army captured by Seven Confederates. (search)
Sixty-nine Federals in sight of their army captured by Seven Confederates. [The following incident is sent us by Captain J. H. Carter, of Lexington, Kentucky, who got it at the time from the participants and other eye-witnesses, and vouches for its accuracy. We should be glad to receive and publish many well authenticated incidents of the prowess of our gallant boys in gray. ] During the retreat of the Confederate army from Kentucky (Bragg's invasion), in the fall of 1862, Colonel Basil W. Duke's regiment of Morgan's cavalry was left, by order of General Kirby Smith, at Falmouth to guard the roads and watch the approach of the Federals, then advancing in large numbers from Cincinnati, Ohio, into the State--the Covington and Georgetown turnpike being their centre line of march. When they had reached a point about one mile from Walton, Boone county, and camped for the night, Duke left Falmouth about midnight, and by a hard ride reached the turnpike, about equi-distant from W
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Shiloh--report of L. D. Sandidge, Inspector-General, Louisiana division. (search)
division of three brigades and four batteries of artillery and a battalion of cavalry extending Bragg's line to the left, and instead of placing the left brigade en potence with the alignment, I fouverlapping it, as stated, by one brigade (Ruggles'), and Withers' division on its right, forming Bragg's line, Bragg being in second line of battle; Polk's corps, composed of Breckinridge's and B. R.Bragg being in second line of battle; Polk's corps, composed of Breckinridge's and B. R. Johnson's brigades, in reserve to rear — B. R. Johnson's brigade leading. Such was the position, as indicated by map inclosed, on night of 4th April preceding the battle. About dark I returned fron without more force, and inquired for your first brigade (Gibson's). You stated you had, at General Bragg's request, detached Gibson, who was following up Hardee's and Withers' advance, and were allhat could hold together, and were fighting for existence. The advance and attack continued--General Bragg issuing orders to bring everything forward, and in less than an hour after Prentiss laid dow
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations about Lookout mountain. (search)
signal, both to Lieutenant-General Hardee and direct to General Bragg: I observed closely from the point the movements ohe day the appended communication (D) was received from General Bragg. A perusal of it will show how highly important he on line of about ten (10) miles. I had been directed by General Bragg, if I needed reinforcements, to call for them (see lettf the order, and called both upon Generals Breckinridge and Bragg for them by a staff officer. I instructed him to say to thsome time for an answer, I received a verbal order from General Bragg, to the effect that no reinforcements could be sent me en left me, as I understood, to get further orders from General Bragg. About 12 o'clock at night, two staff officers of GeGeneral Bragg's rode up to where I was (General Cumming's quarters), and stating that they could not find General Cheatham, handed me orders to him from General Bragg, to send all the troops that had been west of Chattanooga creek to the extreme right.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of Vicksburg in 1862--the battle of Baton Rouge. (search)
nch of the Southern Historical Society has been sustained with a good deal of spirit and interest. They hold regular meetings, and have had read before them a number of papers which deserve to be put in permanent form, and which the president, Major W. O. Dod, and the secretary, Major E. H. McDonald, have promised to send us. Our readers will thank us for giving this week the interesting and valuable paper read before the society by Major John B. Pirtle.] The Army of Tennessee, under General Bragg, had been for several weeks encamped at and near Tupelo, Mississippi, and here on the night of the 18th of June, 1862, the reserve corps, as Breckinridge's division was called (this designation had been given it when the dispositions for the battle of Shiloh were made), received orders to be prepared to march at daylight the next morning. Memphis was now in the possession of the enemy, and a heavy column of infantry and cavalry was menacing our railroad lines at Oxford and Grenada, wher
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hardee and the Military operations around Atlanta. (search)
him as a soldier and commander, and no one at all acquainted with General Cleburne's real feelings could believe him capable of making any imputation against General Hardee. Very respectfully, Irving A. Buck. The following is from Hon. Walter L. Bragg, during the war a soldier and officer in Cleburne's division and an intimate friend of Cleburne and now a leading member of the bar of this State: Montgomery, Alabama, March 15th, 1880. Colonel T. B. Roy, Selma, Alabama: Dear Sir l weaker feature, that of hearsay evidence concerning imputed verbal declarations made on the eve of battle, and attempting to apply them to the movements of an army in battle. No court of justice would listen at them as evidence of anything for a single moment. I regret very much the necessity that compels me to make this statement, but I make it in the interests of truth and justice, and with feelings of sorrow that there should be any occasion for it. Yours, very truly, W. L. Bragg.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of General Beauregard's service in West Tennessee in the Spring of 1862. (search)
alth was infirm at the time, you entrusted General Bragg with the duty of a personal examination ofcorps, respectively under Major-Generals Polk, Bragg and Hardee, leaving the cavalry and certain trou were announced as second in command. Major-General Bragg was nominally appointed chief of the general Bragg, whom we found already in bed. General Bragg declared in favor of your proposition as sfor the movement. Those orders I wrote in General Bragg's room, in the form of a circular letter to Generals Bragg, Polk and Hardee, respectively, directing them to hold their several corps in condiand their transportation. Couriers from General Bragg's headquarters carried these orders to Genston as best, and I left you explaining to Generals Bragg, Polk and Hardee that particularly which tnt out that morning about one o'clock from General Bragg's bedchamber, the troops were all under arfternoon, when, it having been reported by Generals Bragg and Hardee that they were unable to move t[12 more...]