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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
nd wounded over 3,000 of his little army. General Bragg retired toward the mountains, and crossinguac. After resting his army at Knoxville, General Bragg recrossed the mountains and ultimately tood forcing him back toward the Wilkinson pike. Bragg's plan was to drive back the right wing of Roseteenth dashed forward and took the guns. General Bragg allowed these regiments to have the batterDeducting Wheeler's and Hanson's brigades from Bragg's total, that general fought in actual battle he had encountered superior numbers, and gave Bragg's strength, 46,200 infantry, 1,200 sharpshootethis estimate he missed it by over 4,000! General Bragg lost 10,266 of all arms, killed, wounded aBragg's army opposed to him at 62,490, and General Bragg reporting Rosecrans' army at from 60,000 tsecrans estimating Bragg's loss at 14,560, and Bragg reporting an estimated loss for Rosecrans at 2 War Records of both armies, Rosecrans engaged Bragg's 34,650 of all arms, with a force of 43,400 o[17 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
andsomely repulsed by the Holcombe legion. The next attack was on Breckinridge, at the left of French, and the 13th was devoted to heavy cannonading. John Waties' battery was put in position at French's left. There was heavy firing all the morning of the 14th, with brisk skirmishing. Evans' line advanced, drove back the enemy, burned several small houses which sheltered the Federal sharpshooters, and then fell back to their line. Gist's brigade remained encamped near Morton until the latter part of August, when, in response to General Bragg's request for troops, Walker's and Breckinridge's divisions were ordered to report to him near Chattanooga. Capt. James Gist, special aide to General Gist, and Dr. Thomas L. Ogier, division surgeon, both died of fever at Morton, lamented by their comrades. Captain Gist and Doctor Ogier were both identified with the brigade of General Gist from its earliest history, and were greatly loved and respected as efficient and faithful officers.
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
ig.-Gen. Wade Hampton commanded his brigade, including the First and Second South Carolina cavalry, and Capt. J. F. Hart's South Carolina battery was part of the horse artillery under Major Beckham. Thus it will be seen that there were two infantry brigades, five batteries, and two cavalry regiments of South Carolina troops in the army of General Lee on this march into Pennsylvania. Evans' and Gist's brigades were in Mississippi with General Johnston, and Manigault's brigade was with General Bragg's army at Chattanooga. Attached to those commands or serving in the West, were the batteries of Captains Ferguson, Culpeper, Waties and Macbeth. Most of the South Carolina troops of all arms were engaged in the defense of Charleston and the coast of the State, then being attacked by a powerful fleet and a Federal army. On June 7th the corps of Longstreet and Ewell, with the main body of the cavalry under Stuart, were encamped around Culpeper Court House; Hill's corps being in positio
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
untain to Trenton. He was on the flank of General Bragg by the 8th of September, and by the 12th had crossed Lookout mountain. Bragg, having left Chattanooga on the 8th, Rosecrans sent Crittenden's corps at Ringgold and vicinity was at General Bragg's mercy. He was only 10 miles from Bragg'Bragg's headquarters, with the Chickamauga between himself and Thomas, and by road at least 20 miles fromtion of the army. Crittenden marched across Bragg's right, passed the Chickamauga and moved downrps on the west side of the Chickamauga, while Bragg confronted him on the east. The great battlesf cavalry, Major-General Wheeler, operating on Bragg's left: Wharton's division, 2 brigades, 1 batt the writer believes that Rosecrans confronted Bragg with 53,000, exclusive of his cavalry. Befond strengthened his line during the night, and Bragg called his corps commanders and gave his orderd been opportunely and squarely in action. On Bragg's part, six divisions of eighteen brigades, wi[20 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
Wauhatchie Missionary Ridge-Knoxville the Virginia campaign of 1864 from the Wilderness to the battle of the Crater. Following the battle of Chickamauga, Bragg's army occupied Lookout mountain and Missionary ridge, beleaguering Rosecrans, whose troops soon began to suffer for want of food. Longstreet, in command on the lttery, was ordered up the Tennessee valley to wrest Knoxville from Burnside and to divert to that region some of the heavy reinforcements Grant was massing against Bragg. The South Carolina brigades participated in the combats of the advance and the investment of Knoxville. Jenkins' brigade bore the brunt of the engagement at Lennuous suffering for want of shoes, clothing and rations, passed the inclement winter in rugged east Tennessee. On November 20th the South Carolina commands with Bragg on Missionary ridge were the Tenth and Nineteenth, Maj. James L. White (Manigault's brigade); the Sixteenth, Colonel McCullough, and Twenty-fourth, Colonel Stevens
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 21: (search)
Holmes, assistant adjutant-general, Lieutenant Harllee, acting assistant inspector-general, Lieutenant Sill, acting on staff, and C. Kennison, acting aide-de-camp; also the good conduct and coolness in bearing dispatches of Sergeant Blake and Corporal Pinckney of the Second South Carolina. Lieutenant-Colonel Roy, in the advance, was for a time on the left of the brigade, gallantly inspiriting the men. During the operations just narrated, Hagood's brigade had been engaged, under Hoke and Bragg, in the defense of Wilmington, N. C., and of Kinston, maintaining in every combat its old-time reputation for valor. In the operations about Kinston, Lee's corps, under D. H. Hill, also took part, and in the actions of March 8th, 9th and 10th, the South Carolinians of Manigault's brigade were engaged. Having fought to the extremity for a great Right, the army under Gen. Joseph E. Johnston was surrendered April 26, 1865, upon the terms agreed upon between Lee and Grant at Appomattox. The
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
wounded. About the last of August, Gist's brigade was sent to General Bragg. It participated in the battles of Chickamauga and Missionary Gettysburg campaign. When Longstreet was sent to the assistance of Bragg at Chattanooga, Jenkins' brigade was transferred to Hood's divisionregiment were transferred to the army in Mississippi under General Bragg, forming part of the brigade composed of the Tenth and Nineteenth S Pensacola harbor, during the bombardment of November 22, 1861. General Bragg reported at that time that for the number and caliber of guns bspired his volunteers to fight with the tenacity of veterans. Said Bragg: An educated soldier, possessing in an eminent degree the love and was appointed chief of engineers and artillery on the staff of General Bragg, was for a time in command at Pensacola, then was at Mobile, and joining Bragg was promoted brigadier-general early in 1862. He was assigned to command at Fort Pillow on the Mississippi, General Beaureg
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
n command of the detachment which escorted General Bragg from Bentonville to join President Davis ands of the enemy about three weeks later, when Bragg was defeated at Missionary Ridge. At this plaoutheastern Virginia went with it to reinforce Bragg in Georgia. He took part in the fighting aboutle: This absence of Hardee left a gap between Bragg and Stuart, and in order to hold this gap untie campaigns of the army of Tennessee under General Bragg. After the battle of Murfreesboro, when Mthe country he was sent with dispatches to General Bragg, and was given ten days' leave of absenceouth with his command he was in engagements of Bragg's command at Fort Fisher, Fort Anderson and Ol served in the garrison at Pensacola under General Bragg; at the end of one year's service re-enlisunder Johnston in the defense of Jackson, with Bragg in the great victory at Chickamauga, under Johed officer, taking part in the campaign of General Bragg in Kentucky and Tennessee, until the battl[5 more...]