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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
of May, 1864, he presented his plan of strategy to the War Department, at the head of which then were Mr. Seddon and General Bragg. Lee had about 45,000 effective forces; Beauregard about 15,000; and the plan he presented was for Lee to fall back enerals of the Confederate army. This plan, unfortunately, was rejected by the President, and immediately thereafter General Bragg sent to General Whiting an order saying that General Lee was pressed very hard by Grant, and needed all the reinforcewas submitted to me, his second in command, by General Whiting, for my opinion as to its execution. It was signed by General Bragg officially. I read it with care, and unequivocally gave the opinion that it should not be obeyed, for the reason thafor the defence of Petersburg to the last extremity in my power. I state these facts because it has been denied that General Bragg ever issued such an order. It was read and considered by another besides General Whiting and myself. In two hours f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.4 (search)
Forrest, has re-incited deep interest in the phenomenal leader. Any illustration of his brilliant career, even unpretentious, may be deemed acceptable to the public. The narrative of a follower of the great soldier, which is presented, was sent the Editor by Mr. W. L. Fleming, a librarian of the A. & M. College, Auburn, Ala. In the early part of April, 1863, the commander of the Federal forces in Tennessee determined to send a strong raiding party around the Confederate forces under Gen. Bragg for the purpose of destroying the railroads and cutting off supplies and reinforcements, and also to destroy the extensive Confederate works then at Rome, Ga. For this daring purpose Col. Abel D. Streight, of Indiana, was selected, and he was given command of 2,000 picked Western men, well mounted and armed with the best arms in the Federal service. To this party was also attached a section of the 6th Ohio Light Battery. Streight's party was accompanied by a strong force of infantry a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
ery to the hill, which to keep a shooting, and keeping the brigade building fires all night and his band playing music, to make the Yankees believe there was a corps instead of the few hundred men he had for duty, is too well told by John Esten Cook for me but to incidentally mention. For the third time was he wounded, and as usual in displaying conspicuous gallantry, for which he was promoted major-general of cavalry. Sherman's forces threatening the powder mills at Augusta, Beauregard, Bragg, the Governors of Georgia and South Carolina appealed for reinforcements from the Army of Northern Virginia. Major-General P. M. B. Young, with a division (?), consisting of 900 dismounted cavalrymen, under the immediate command of Captain F. E. Eve, was all that General Robert E. Lee could spareā€”and General Young was selected, hoping his men could be mounted and he assist General Wheeler in opposing General Kilpatrick, whose brigade he had defeated at Brandy Station with the sabre, and at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Drewry's Bluff. (search)
gard to General Wise Regarding the battle, and the difference between General Beauregard and General Bragg as to the war policy at that crisis. Now printed, as written, from the original, now owne Pres't being sick & very tired, Col. Stevens could not see him, but delivered my message to General Bragg with my request that the necessary order sh'd be issued at once, but he refused to do it, al save Richard & the Conf'cy, he still refused to issue the necessary orders. I then said to him Bragg circumstances have thrown the fate of the Conf'cy in y'r hands & mine, let us play our parts boliers on the afternoon of the 15th we w'd nevertheless have captured or destroyed Butler's army. Bragg's last dispatch to Whiting could not have been dated before the 14th of May, for he only knew of I sent you at the time. I regret that I have not a copy of Ransom's subterfuge in defence of Bragg or I w'd send it to you with pleasure, but you will probably find it in the back files of the Ri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
were attracted to this bit of bronze; singularly enough, many of them had never before heard of Sam Davis and his tragic death. Here is the story: In 1863 General Bragg sent a number of picked men, as scouts, among them Sam Davis, into Middle Tennessee in order to gain information concerning the Federal army; he wished to know if the Union army was re-enforcing Chattanooga. The men were to go South and send their reports by courier line to General Bragg at Missionary Ridge. The expedition was attended with much danger. The scouts had seen the 16th Army Corps, commanded by General Dodge, move from Corinth to Pulaski, and on Friday, November 19, theof Sam Davis. In his saddle-bags the plans and fortifications as well as an exact report of the Federal Army in Tennessee were found. A letter intended for General Bragg was also found. General Dodge sent for Davis and told him that he had a serious charge to make; that he was a spy and did not seem to realize the danger he