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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 958 6 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 615 3 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 562 2 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 454 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 380 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 343 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 340 20 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 339 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 325 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 308 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Braxton Bragg or search for Braxton Bragg in all documents.

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ga; and as this movement would be followed of course by a maneuvre on the part of the enemy, now (at Tupelo under General Braxton Bragg, either to meet Buell or frustrate his designs by some counteroperation, I was expected to furnish, by scouting ahirty-two private letters, the partial reading of which disclosed to me the positive transfer from Mississippi of most of Bragg's army, for the purpose of counteracting Buell's operations in northern Alabama and East Tennessee. This decisive evidens of Confederates destroyed the road again as soon as he had passed on. But worst of all, the time thus consumed gave General Bragg the opportunity to reorganize and increase his army General Sheridan's war horse, Rienzi. to such an extent that rnment became necessary, and the concentration of National troops at Louisville and Cincinnati to meet the contingency of Bragg's reaching those points was an obvious requirement. These troops were drawn from all sections in the West where it was t
. Two Confederate armies, under General Kirby Smith and General Braxton Bragg, had penetrated into Kentucky, the one under Smith by the way of Cumberland Gap, the other and main army under Bragg by way of the Sequatche Valley, Glasgow, and Mumfordsville. Glasgow was captured bonsiderable alarm in the North, for fears were now entertained that Bragg would strike Louisville and capture the city before Buell could arry, from the Bardstown pike to the river. The apprehended attack by Bragg never came, however, for in the race that was then going on betweenhe was particularly censured by many for not offering battle to General Bragg while the two armies were marching parallel to each other, and ordsville also. The capture of this point, with its garrison, gave Bragg an advantage in the race toward the Ohio River, which odds would moayed from Chattanooga to Glasgow; but something always diverted General Bragg at the supreme moment, and he failed to utilize the chances fal
l was my objective point, were straining every effort to put it in a state of defense, and had collected between four and five thousand irregular troops, under General Bragg, besides bringing up three brigades of infantry from the force confronting General Butler south of the James River, the alarm being intensified by the retreat,daylight on the 12th the head of my column, under Wilson, reached the Mechanicsville pike. Here Wilson, encountering the enemy's works and batteries manned by General Bragg's troops, endeavored to pass. In this he failed, and as soon as I was notified that it was impracticable to reach Fair Oaks by passing between the works and td to ruin us, or at least compel us to return by the same route we had taken in coming, in which case we would run into Gordon's brigade, but the signal repulse of Bragg's infantry dispelled these illusions. Even had it not been our good fortune to defeat him, we could have crossed the Chickahominy if necessary at several point