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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 958 6 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 615 3 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 562 2 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 454 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 380 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 343 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 340 20 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 339 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 325 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 308 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Braxton Bragg or search for Braxton Bragg in all documents.

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party vote — that is, by the votes of all others in the affirmative, against the Republicans in the negative: Yeas 36; Nays 19. Yeas--Messrs. Benjamin, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Brown, Chesnut, C. C. Clay, Clingman, Crittenden, Davis, Fitzpatrick, Green, Gwin, Hammond, Hemphill, Hunter, Iverson, Johnson, of Ark., Johnson, of Tenn.iana, Gwin and Latham, of California, Lane, of Oregon--in all, seven from Free States; with Messrs. Kennedy and Pearce, of Maryland, Hunter and Mason, of Virginia, Bragg and Clingman, of North Carolina, Chesnut and Hammond, of South Carolina, Iverson and Toombs, of Georgia, C. C. Clay and Fitzpatrick, of Alabama, Brown and Davis, o never will, require, etc. This was rejected — Yeas 16; Nays 33. Then Mr. Clingman's amendment was adopted: Yeas 26; Nays 23. Yeas--Messrs Bigler, Bingham, Bragg, Chandler, Clark, Clingman, Collamer, Crittenden, Dixon, Doolittle, Foot, Grimes, Hale, Hamlin, Harlan, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Latham, Polk, Pugh, Simmons
d Constitution should be directed all the energies of all the departments of the Government, and the efforts of all good citizens. The vote was now taken on this substitute, which was adopted, as follows: Yeas.--Messrs. Anthony, Baker, Bingham, Cameron, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Durkee, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson-25 [all Republicans]. Nays.--Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Clingman, Crittenden, Fitch, Green, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane, of Oregon, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Saulsbury, and Sebastian-23 [all Democrats, but two Bell-Conservatives, in italics]. Messrs. Iverson, of Georgia, Benjamin and Slidell, of Louisiana, Hemphill and Wigfall, of Texas, and R. W. Johnson, of Arkansas--who had voted just before against taking up the Kansas bill-had now absented themselves or sat silent, and allowed Mr.
at this traffic is strictly forbidden ; and all such supplies which may be captured in transit to said vessels, or to Fort Pickens, will be confiscated. The more effectually to enforce this prohibition, no boat or vessel will be allowed to visit Fort Pickens, or any of the United States naval vessels, without special sanction. Col. John H. Forney, Acting InspectorGeneral, will organize an efficient Harbor Police for the enforcement of this order. By command of Brigadier General Braxton Bragg. Robert C. Wood, Jr., Ass't. Adj't.-Gen. And, all through the seceded States, those Unionists who dared to indicate their devotion to the flag of their fathers were being treated with a still more active and positive illustration of Confederate amity than was accorded to the garrison of Sumter and the fleet off Pensacola. Whether President Lincoln did or did not, for some days after his inauguration, incline to the withdrawal of Major Anderson and his brave handful from. closely
bels might have been taken; as it was, Col. Brown returned unmolested to the fort. Fort Pickens, on the western extremity of Santa Rosa Island, commanding the main entrance to Pensacola harbor, was saved to the Union, as we have seen, Page 412. by the fidelity and prompt energy of Lieut. Slemmer. It was reenforced soon after the fall Map of Fort Pickens, Pensacola, etc. of Sumter, and its defense confided to Col. Harvey Brown. A formidable Rebel force, ultimately commanded by Gen. Braxton Bragg, was assembled, early in the war, at Pensacola, and long threatened an attack or bombardment, which, on our side, was eagerly awaited. Com. William Mervine, commanding the Gulf Blockading Squadron, having observed that a schooner named the Judah was being fitted out in the harbor of Pensacola as a privateer, with intent to slip out some dark night, prepared to cruise against our commerce, planned an expedition to destroy her. During the night of Sept. 13th, four boats, carrying 100
on, 587. Boyd, Linn, of Ky., 208; chosen Speaker, 226; again chosen, 250. Bradley, Dr., of Plymouth, Mass., 125. Bragg, Gen. Braxton, his order as to Fort Pickens, 436; 601; attacks Wilson's Zouaves, etc., 602. Braine, Lieut., commandingnor of Mississippi, 211. Foote, Capt., at the battle of Belmont, 597. Forney, Col. John H., (Rebel,) allusion to in Bragg's order, 436; wounded at Dranesville, 626. Forney, John W., chosen Clerk of the House, 806; chosen Clerk of the Senate occupied by S. C., 409; fires on Star of the West, 412. Fort Pickens, Fla., occupied by Lieut. Slemmer, 412; order of Bragg, 436; President's Message, 556; Rebel attack on Santa Rosa Island, etc., 601-602. Fort Pike, seized by Louisiana troop, with 600 men, 523. Pennington, Wm., Speaker, 305; 306; 372. Pensacola, Fla., seizure of Federal property at, 412; Bragg in command; schooner Judah burnt, 601-2; the Rebels attack Santa Rosa Island; they evacuate the post, 602. Pennsylvani