hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 958 6 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 615 3 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 562 2 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 454 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 380 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 343 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 340 20 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 339 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 325 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 308 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Braxton Bragg or search for Braxton Bragg in all documents.

Your search returned 61 results in 13 document sections:

1 2
mmense pile on the right of the Fort, escaped the torch of the incendiaries; but the magnificent naval hospital, said to be the finest structure of the kind in the United States, lies a mass of smouldering ruins. It was behind this hospital that Bragg had a heavy mortar battery during the first bombardment, and shielded from the fire of Pickens by the humane folds of the yellow flag which floated over the hospital, he kept up an incessant fire upon the Federal garrison. So general was the ruiaid to blow them up, and instead of entering the Fort by the main passage, they scaled the walls. The magazines of both forts will be excavated, in order to ascertain if the rebels left any infernal mechanism by which to destroy the Federals. Bragg took away with him, in march, a large rifled cannon and ten-inch columbiad, which constituted the light-house battery. The armaments of the different batteries and forts at Pensacola at the time of the bombardment, as near as it can be ascertain
Doc. 23.-Bragg's address to his army. headquarters Second corps, army of the Mississippi, Corinth, May 5. Soldiers: You are again about to encounter the mercenary invader who pollutes the sacred soil of our beloved country. Severely punished by you, and driven from his chosen positions with a loss of his artillery and his honor at Shiloh, when double your numbers, he now approaches cautiously and timidly — unwilling to advance, unable to retreat. Could his rank and file enjoy a freened to swell your numbers, while the gallant Van Dorn and invincible Price, with the ever-successful Army of the West, are now in your midst, with numbers almost equalling the Army of Shiloh. We have, then, but to strike and destroy, and as the enemy's whole resources are concentrated here, we shall not only redeem Tennessee, Kentucky, and Missouri at one blow, but open the portals of the whole North-west. Braxton Bragg, General Commanding Second Corps. G. C. Garner, Assist. Adjt.-General.
ngagement with the Federal gunboats at Plum Point Bend, four miles above Fort Pillow, May tenth, 1862. Having previously arranged with my officers the order of attack, our boats left their moorings at six o'clock A. M., and proceeding up the river, passed round a sharp point, which brought us in full view of the enemy's fleet, numbering eight gunboats and twelve mortar-boats. The Federal boat Carondelet was lying nearest us, guarding a mortar-boat that was shelling the Fort. The General Bragg, Capt. W. H. H. Leonard, dashed at her; the Carondelet, firing her heavy guns, retreated toward a bar, where the depth of water would not be sufficient for our boats to follow. The Bragg continued boldly on under fire of nearly their whole fleet, and struck her a violent blow that stopped her further flight, then rounded down the river under a broadside fire, and drifted until her tiller-rope that had got out of order, could be readjusted. A few moments after the Bragg struck her blow, t
idly advance in the direction of the heaviest firing; for the art of war consists in concentration of masses. Moreover, our motto should be, Forward, and always forward! until victory may perch decisively upon our banners. The more rapid the attack the weaker, habitually, the resistance. Respectfully, General, your ob't serv't, G. T. Beauregard, Gen. Com'g. To Major-General Braxton Bragg, Com'g Army of the Miss. By command of General Bragg. George C. Garner, Assistant Adjutant General. idly advance in the direction of the heaviest firing; for the art of war consists in concentration of masses. Moreover, our motto should be, Forward, and always forward! until victory may perch decisively upon our banners. The more rapid the attack the weaker, habitually, the resistance. Respectfully, General, your ob't serv't, G. T. Beauregard, Gen. Com'g. To Major-General Braxton Bragg, Com'g Army of the Miss. By command of General Bragg. George C. Garner, Assistant Adjutant General.
enches. Regiment after regiment pressed on, and passing through extensive camps just vacated, soon reached Corinth and found half of it in flames. Beauregard and Bragg had left the afternoon before, and the rearguard had passed out of the town before daylight, leaving enough stragglers to commit many acts of vandalism, at the expsimilar to that employed in our own army. The wires, however, were all cut, and the instruments taken away. The quarters of Price, Van Dorn, Hardee, Pillow and Bragg were pointed out by citizens, who stated that each of these notabilities commanded a corps d'armee, and that that these were subdivided into divisions and brigadesalled a council of war on Tuesday evening, and announced his determination to evacuate Corinth. I learn that Pillow, Price and Hardee concurred with him, and that Bragg and Van Dorn opposed the movement, as absolutely destructive of the cause. But all would not do; the order was given, and Corinth was evacuated. The sick, of w
ch was flying from the peak of the rebel gunboat and ram, the Gen. Bragg, when captured in the naval action off this city yesterday morning. The Gen. Bragg is one of the rebel steamers saved, and is now being prepared for the use of the Government as a war vessel. Of the eigbel fleet, comprising the Gen. Van Dorn, (flag-ship,) Gen. Price, Gen. Bragg, Jeff. Thompson, Gen. Lovell, Gen. Beauregard, Sumter, and Littleest part of the engagement lasts some thirty minutes, when the Gen. Bragg, Sumter, Jeff. Thompson and Van Dorn, backing out with all possiblee left the Benton in the tug Dauntless, and board and land the Gen. Bragg, a large and valuable gulf steamer. After our party remained there following boats: General Van Dorn, (flag-ship,) General Price, General Bragg, Jeff. Thompson, General Lovell, General Beauregard, Sumter, an the fight terminates. The Jeff. Thompson, Beauregard, Sumter, and Bragg were respectively disabled, run ashore, or set on fire, their crews
me admirably in this respect, giving notice of Bragg's approach when over fifty miles distant, and river ten miles above, with the right wing of Bragg's army, and coming down on the north side, tooaken position on the hills on the south side. Bragg had sent a summons to surrender, and a consultlder to receive it. It covered a note from General Bragg, commanding the enemy's forces, asserting Bowling Green. I, therefore, sent a note to Gen. Bragg, asking a further suspension of hostilities Adjutant-General C. S.: A courier from General Bragg's headquarters, eight miles west of Munfoe eighteenth instant, confirms the report that Bragg captured about five thousand men at Munfordviltillery and munitions in large quantities. Braxton Bragg. Doc. 122.-battle of Antietam, Md. in the rear of Buell, in his movement against Bragg. In conjunction with Gen. Grant, he thereforen opportunity of operating at his will against Bragg, from whose vicinity we are anxiously awaiting[4 more...]
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
ar, and you can't receive reinforcements. General Bragg's army is but a short distance in the rear river ten miles above, with the right wing of Bragg's army, and coming down on the north side, tooaken position on the hills on the south side. Bragg had sent a summons to surrender, and a consultlder to receive it. It covered a note from General Bragg, commanding the enemy's forces, asserting Bowling Green. I, therefore, sent a note to Gen. Bragg, asking a further suspension of hostilities bstance that we had held the enemy, said to be Bragg's and Polk's whole army, at bay all day; that Adjutant-General C. S.: A courier from General Bragg's headquarters, eight miles west of Munfoe eighteenth instant, confirms the report that Bragg captured about five thousand men at Munfordvileceived. Samuel Jones, Major-General. General Bragg's report. To General S. Cooper, Adjutthousand (4000) small arms, pieces of artillery and munitions in large quantities. Braxton Bragg. [1 more...]
e that Price had occupied Iuka in force, and was endeavoring to cross the Tennessee River, for the purpose of getting in the rear of Buell, in his movement against Bragg. In conjunction with Gen. Grant, he therefore prepared to bag the Diarrhoetic General. It was decided upon that a column of eighteen thousand men under Generals er confederate victory (?). So, for the present, Northern Mississippi is safe from its liberators, and Buell has an opportunity of operating at his will against Bragg, from whose vicinity we are anxiously awaiting some stirring news. J. C. C. Jackson Mississippian account. Baldwin, Sept. 24, 1862. dear Cooper: I wrot an army of brave men, fighting for their country, or merely following a band of armed marauders, who are as terrible to their friends as foes. I once thought General Bragg too severe in his discipline, but I am satisfied none but the severest discipline will restrain men upon a march. The settlements through which we passed we
isions. I have since been reliably informed that Gen. Bragg commanded the enemy in person, and that Polk's anf the rebel army, and under the direction and eye of Bragg, Buckner, Polk, Cheatham, and other prominent Generan final, so far as it concerned the rebel army under Bragg. On the march from Louisville not a day passed wimen, too, of good judgment and intelligence, that Gen. Bragg, with the main body of his infantry, passed thrountended to give battle anywhere in Kentucky; and had Bragg, with his comparatively meagre force, seriously thouarmy of water. And I unhesitatingly assert that had Bragg been able to hold that position for three or four daht hours after the commencement of the action. This Bragg well knew, and hence never dreamed of making a serioo means. Had we known the whole truth, namely, that Bragg's entire army cannot be as much as forty thousand stected his chosen bands, and, under the leadership of Bragg himself, advanced determinedly toward our centre, or
1 2